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NEWS
July 8, 2005
THE ODD AND difficult case of New York Times reporter Judith Miller did not get any easier as Ms. Miller went to jail this week for refusing to tell a grand jury what she knows about the "outing" of Valerie Plame as a CIA agent. It is a shame that the case has gotten to this point, particularly since Ms. Miller never wrote a story on the subject. But this result is not surprising in light of last week's refusal by the U.S. Supreme Court to consider the cases of Ms. Miller and Matthew Cooper, a reporter for Time magazine.
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FEATURES
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | November 12, 2005
Now begins the spin. Just days after the resignation of Judith Miller from The New York Times in a case that has roiled the paper's staff and the institution itself, both Miller andThe Times' publisher have begun trying to repair their respective reputations. Freed from having to toe the company line, Miller appeared on CNN's Larry King Live on Thursday night and said she had been "stunned and saddened" by attacks from colleagues, but that she would not have acted differently during her 28 years at the paper.
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FEATURES
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | November 12, 2005
Now begins the spin. Just days after the resignation of Judith Miller from The New York Times in a case that has roiled the paper's staff and the institution itself, both Miller andThe Times' publisher have begun trying to repair their respective reputations. Freed from having to toe the company line, Miller appeared on CNN's Larry King Live on Thursday night and said she had been "stunned and saddened" by attacks from colleagues, but that she would not have acted differently during her 28 years at the paper.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | October 21, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Conservative critics usually can't stop jabbering about the "liberal media." Yet the pantheon of punditry on the right has been oddly mute about the amazing service that The New York Times' Judith Miller has performed for the Bush administration's policy of regime change in Iraq. Boosters of Team Bush should give Ms. Miller a medal. She recently spent 85 days in a federal detention center for refusing to identify a confidential source. Special prosecutor Patrick J. Fitzgerald said her testimony was crucial to his investigation of the Bush administration leak that outed undercover CIA officer Valerie Plame, the wife of former Ambassador Joseph C. Wilson IV, a critic of the Bush White House.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1996
"God Has Ninety Nine Names: Reporting from a Militant Middle East," by Judith Miller. Simon and Schuster. 574 pages. $30.In one of the stranger moments in Judith Miller's book, Libyan strongman Muammar Qadafi gathered a group of female journalists to show off his commitment to women's dignity.He offered each an "exclusive" interview. "But something told me to decline," she writes. Colleagues who accepted found themselves fighting off Qadafi's crude sexual advances.The "something" that kept Miller out of Qadafi's heavily cologned clutches is a fairly reliable sixth sense about whom to trust and whom not to trust among Mideast leaders, most of whom combine varying amounts of corruption, cruelty and incompetence or, in Qadafi's case, insanity.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | October 21, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Conservative critics usually can't stop jabbering about the "liberal media." Yet the pantheon of punditry on the right has been oddly mute about the amazing service that The New York Times' Judith Miller has performed for the Bush administration's policy of regime change in Iraq. Boosters of Team Bush should give Ms. Miller a medal. She recently spent 85 days in a federal detention center for refusing to identify a confidential source. Special prosecutor Patrick J. Fitzgerald said her testimony was crucial to his investigation of the Bush administration leak that outed undercover CIA officer Valerie Plame, the wife of former Ambassador Joseph C. Wilson IV, a critic of the Bush White House.
TOPIC
By Paul Moore | July 3, 2005
JUDITH MILLER of The New York Times and, possibly, Matthew Cooper of Time magazine, are preparing to be sent to prison this week for refusing to testify about conversations with confidential sources. To journalists, a reporter's word to withhold the identity of a confidential source is sacred - with good reason. If that promise proves hollow, journalists will lose access to much of the information they need to tell the truth about the world around us. "When you promise someone anonymity, you need to be able to keep that promise," Rick Rodriguez, president of the American Society of Newspaper Editors and executive editor of The Sacramento Bee, told Sun media reporter Nick Madigan last week.
FEATURES
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2005
The jailing of Judith Miller, a reporter for The New York Times, may not strike the average citizen as anything to get excited about. The issues are arcane, the players are mostly obscure Washington insiders, and, in many people's minds, journalists barely command the kind of respect afforded a dog catcher. But within the world of journalism, there are many who feel that Miller's refusal, even under threat of imprisonment, to reveal the name of a source to whom she had promised anonymity was nothing short of heroic.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2005
Under pressure from a judge and a special prosecutor, and a threat of jail for a veteran reporter, Time magazine announced yesterday that it would identify who in the White House leaked the name of a covert CIA agent. The announcement by the magazine, which could spare reporter Matthew Cooper a stint behind bars, came a day after a federal judge in Washington gave Time and The New York Times 48 hours to file papers explaining whether they would comply with a long-standing order that they provide a grand jury with the source of the leak.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Staff Writer | November 29, 1992
Books, if you'll let me state the obvious, can be the most treasured gifts you can give. Each year before Christmas, gorgeous coffee-table books on interior design and landscaping appear in the stores. They make wonderful presents, but not all of us can afford to spend $50 or $75 on something so beautiful but impractical.What sometimes get overlooked in gift-book round-ups like this are the less expensive how-to volumes. They can be beautiful, too, and they bring added pleasure to the recipient: advice on how to design a garden, perhaps, or suggestions for arts and crafts projects.
FEATURES
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2005
The jailing of Judith Miller, a reporter for The New York Times, may not strike the average citizen as anything to get excited about. The issues are arcane, the players are mostly obscure Washington insiders, and, in many people's minds, journalists barely command the kind of respect afforded a dog catcher. But within the world of journalism, there are many who feel that Miller's refusal, even under threat of imprisonment, to reveal the name of a source to whom she had promised anonymity was nothing short of heroic.
NEWS
July 8, 2005
THE ODD AND difficult case of New York Times reporter Judith Miller did not get any easier as Ms. Miller went to jail this week for refusing to tell a grand jury what she knows about the "outing" of Valerie Plame as a CIA agent. It is a shame that the case has gotten to this point, particularly since Ms. Miller never wrote a story on the subject. But this result is not surprising in light of last week's refusal by the U.S. Supreme Court to consider the cases of Ms. Miller and Matthew Cooper, a reporter for Time magazine.
TOPIC
By Paul Moore | July 3, 2005
JUDITH MILLER of The New York Times and, possibly, Matthew Cooper of Time magazine, are preparing to be sent to prison this week for refusing to testify about conversations with confidential sources. To journalists, a reporter's word to withhold the identity of a confidential source is sacred - with good reason. If that promise proves hollow, journalists will lose access to much of the information they need to tell the truth about the world around us. "When you promise someone anonymity, you need to be able to keep that promise," Rick Rodriguez, president of the American Society of Newspaper Editors and executive editor of The Sacramento Bee, told Sun media reporter Nick Madigan last week.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2005
Under pressure from a judge and a special prosecutor, and a threat of jail for a veteran reporter, Time magazine announced yesterday that it would identify who in the White House leaked the name of a covert CIA agent. The announcement by the magazine, which could spare reporter Matthew Cooper a stint behind bars, came a day after a federal judge in Washington gave Time and The New York Times 48 hours to file papers explaining whether they would comply with a long-standing order that they provide a grand jury with the source of the leak.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1996
"God Has Ninety Nine Names: Reporting from a Militant Middle East," by Judith Miller. Simon and Schuster. 574 pages. $30.In one of the stranger moments in Judith Miller's book, Libyan strongman Muammar Qadafi gathered a group of female journalists to show off his commitment to women's dignity.He offered each an "exclusive" interview. "But something told me to decline," she writes. Colleagues who accepted found themselves fighting off Qadafi's crude sexual advances.The "something" that kept Miller out of Qadafi's heavily cologned clutches is a fairly reliable sixth sense about whom to trust and whom not to trust among Mideast leaders, most of whom combine varying amounts of corruption, cruelty and incompetence or, in Qadafi's case, insanity.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Staff Writer | November 29, 1992
Books, if you'll let me state the obvious, can be the most treasured gifts you can give. Each year before Christmas, gorgeous coffee-table books on interior design and landscaping appear in the stores. They make wonderful presents, but not all of us can afford to spend $50 or $75 on something so beautiful but impractical.What sometimes get overlooked in gift-book round-ups like this are the less expensive how-to volumes. They can be beautiful, too, and they bring added pleasure to the recipient: advice on how to design a garden, perhaps, or suggestions for arts and crafts projects.
NEWS
June 24, 2003
On June 22, 2003, ELEANOR CHARLOTTE (nee Reinecke); beloved wife of the late Harold F. Senft, Jr.; loving mother of H. Gary Senft, Marvin E. Senft, Judith Miller, and Dianne Sweeney. She is also survived by ten grandchildren, five great-grandchildren, and one on the way. Friends may call at the family owned Leonard J. Ruck, Inc. Funeral Home, 5305 Harford Road (at Echodale), on Wednesday, from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Funeral Services will be held at St. John Lutheran Church, Thursday, at 10 A.M. Interment Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens.
NEWS
April 29, 2006
On April 28, 2006, MARIAN "MAHSEE" KLEIN (nee Hochberg) died at home in Lake Worth, FL.; beloved wife of Ted; sister of Rheba Sher; devoted mother of the late Judith Miller, Richard Klein and Dr. Joel Klein; mother in-law of Steve Miller, Jeannie Klein and the late Barbara Klein; loving grandmother of Jennifer (Ben) Miller Hersey, Melissa (Ryan) Lenet, Alison (Mike) Kelly, Kamala (Jack) Cunningham, Caleb Klein and Jordan Klein; great-grandmother of Jacob Lenet. She is also survived by nieces and nephews.
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