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Judith Jamison

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By Mike Giuliano | February 10, 1991
Even seated, Judith Jamison is a tall woman. Her black dress is like a waterfall that has a long way to go before reaching the floor. Her earrings are no mere circular dots, but likewise dangle down."
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2012
Gifted with a mother's second sight, Catherine Johnson knew her daughter Jacqueline Green better than the child knew herself. In 2004, the eighth-grader insisted she had absolutely zero desire to study dance. "Oh, Mom," she said, rolling her eyes. "Why would I want to do that?" Nonetheless, at her mother's prodding and though she had never taken a dance class in her life, she auditioned for the Baltimore School of the Arts. On Tuesday, the 22-year-old Green will return to her hometown for the first time as a member of the main company of Alvin Ailey Dance Theatre, one of America's premier modern dance troupes.
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By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | February 13, 1992
Leaping forward while keeping a foot in the past may seem an impossible task. But not if you're a dancer, especially one of those long-limbed, taffy-elastic Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre dancers."
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1999
Every year, CBS uses the slowest TV week of the year -- the week between Christmas and New Year's -- to showcase the annual "Kennedy Center Honors" program and spotlight the careers of some of this country's most talented performers. This year, the spotlight falls on Victor Borge, Sean Connery, Judith Jamison, Jason Robards Jr. and Stevie Wonder."The Kennedy Center Honors" never wants for worthy honorees -- everyone from Leonard Bernstein to Fred Astaire to B.B. King to Bob Dylan has been feted, each with a segment in which fellow performers pay tribute.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1999
Every year, CBS uses the slowest TV week of the year -- the week between Christmas and New Year's -- to showcase the annual "Kennedy Center Honors" program and spotlight the careers of some of this country's most talented performers. This year, the spotlight falls on Victor Borge, Sean Connery, Judith Jamison, Jason Robards Jr. and Stevie Wonder."The Kennedy Center Honors" never wants for worthy honorees -- everyone from Leonard Bernstein to Fred Astaire to B.B. King to Bob Dylan has been feted, each with a segment in which fellow performers pay tribute.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | February 28, 1993
Greensboro, N.C. -- The arms, Judith Jamison tells the dancers during rehearsal, should go "whoosh." It's a subtle movement, not easily defined in the vocabulary of words. But indeed, when the dancers get it right, it's as if a current of air has lifted all their arms at exactly the same moment, and they look like a flock of birds rising over the horizon.It's a common motif in the repertory of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater -- it turns up in two of the four pieces in this particular evening's show alone -- and the wind beneath those wings, it can be argued, is Judith Jamison.
FEATURES
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Evening Sun Staff | November 8, 1990
JUDITH JAMISON teaches dance the way she danced herself, with an almost blinding intensity, her power rolling like thunder over her students as it once rolled over her audiences.She's a cross between a drill sergeant and a snake charmer in jjTC dance class at Morgan State University, commanding the bodies of young dancers through the rigors of modern dance in a patter of orders that could challenge and intimidate even a professional dancer.And through their nervous sweat, the dance students seem hell bent on pleasing Jamison and a little fearful of the towering woman standing over them, dressed in black.
NEWS
By Nancy Knisley and Nancy Knisley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 8, 1999
Maria Broom remembers the magical moment when she knew, with absolute certainty, what she wanted to be when she grew up: a dancer.She was 6, and her mother had taken her to the Lyric Theatre to see what Broom describes as a "grand, traditional ballet" with a full company of dancers. Even now, more than 40 years later, her voice reflects the awe and excitement she felt watching the performance.She remembers "a whole village of people created on stage," the beautiful costumes, and scenery that included forests and houses, a day scene, a night scene.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2012
Gifted with a mother's second sight, Catherine Johnson knew her daughter Jacqueline Green better than the child knew herself. In 2004, the eighth-grader insisted she had absolutely zero desire to study dance. "Oh, Mom," she said, rolling her eyes. "Why would I want to do that?" Nonetheless, at her mother's prodding and though she had never taken a dance class in her life, she auditioned for the Baltimore School of the Arts. On Tuesday, the 22-year-old Green will return to her hometown for the first time as a member of the main company of Alvin Ailey Dance Theatre, one of America's premier modern dance troupes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. L. Conklin and J. L. Conklin,Contributing Writer | March 5, 1993
If you are looking for a way to chase the midwinter blues, a reason to smile, the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre is in Baltimore this weekend at the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre. This popular company, under the artistic direction of Judith Jamison,If you are looking for a way to chase the midwinter blues, a reason to smile, the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre is in Baltimore this weekend at the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre. This popular company, under the artistic direction of Judith Jamison, opened its four-day engagement with a benefit performance that attracted this city's cultural elite and wowed the most jaded audience member with with their power-packed dancing.
NEWS
By Nancy Knisley and Nancy Knisley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 8, 1999
Maria Broom remembers the magical moment when she knew, with absolute certainty, what she wanted to be when she grew up: a dancer.She was 6, and her mother had taken her to the Lyric Theatre to see what Broom describes as a "grand, traditional ballet" with a full company of dancers. Even now, more than 40 years later, her voice reflects the awe and excitement she felt watching the performance.She remembers "a whole village of people created on stage," the beautiful costumes, and scenery that included forests and houses, a day scene, a night scene.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | February 28, 1993
Greensboro, N.C. -- The arms, Judith Jamison tells the dancers during rehearsal, should go "whoosh." It's a subtle movement, not easily defined in the vocabulary of words. But indeed, when the dancers get it right, it's as if a current of air has lifted all their arms at exactly the same moment, and they look like a flock of birds rising over the horizon.It's a common motif in the repertory of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater -- it turns up in two of the four pieces in this particular evening's show alone -- and the wind beneath those wings, it can be argued, is Judith Jamison.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | February 13, 1992
Leaping forward while keeping a foot in the past may seem an impossible task. But not if you're a dancer, especially one of those long-limbed, taffy-elastic Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre dancers."
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano | February 10, 1991
Even seated, Judith Jamison is a tall woman. Her black dress is like a waterfall that has a long way to go before reaching the floor. Her earrings are no mere circular dots, but likewise dangle down."
FEATURES
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Evening Sun Staff | November 8, 1990
JUDITH JAMISON teaches dance the way she danced herself, with an almost blinding intensity, her power rolling like thunder over her students as it once rolled over her audiences.She's a cross between a drill sergeant and a snake charmer in jjTC dance class at Morgan State University, commanding the bodies of young dancers through the rigors of modern dance in a patter of orders that could challenge and intimidate even a professional dancer.And through their nervous sweat, the dance students seem hell bent on pleasing Jamison and a little fearful of the towering woman standing over them, dressed in black.
NEWS
February 9, 2009
Series American Experience: : "The Assassination of Abraham Lincoln" focuses on the months after his death, when a nation mourned and authorities sought his killer. Will Patton reads the words of John Wilkes Booth. (9 p.m., MPT, Channels 22/67) The Girls of Hedsor Hall: : Young women try to become ladies at a proper English finishing school in this new, unscripted series. (9 p.m., MTV) Medium: : Allison (Patricia Arquette) dreams of murders witnessed by someone who's already dead. (10 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Judith Green | April 16, 1998
Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, flourishing in its 40th anniversary year under the stewardship of Judith Jamison, plays its annual engagement at the Kennedy Center next week. This has been going on since the Ailey dancers opened the Kennedy Center as part of the ensemble for Leonard Bernstein's "Mass" in 1975. As always, the company has brought a full slate of new works and great vintage pieces. You can see the immortal "Revelations," Ailey's tribute to black spirituals, on five of the seven programs; or George Faison's homage to Otis Redding, "Suite Otis," on three.
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