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By Michael Dresser and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2013
The General Assembly took an important step toward repealing Maryland's death penalty Thursday night when a key committee, for the first time in decades, approved a bill to end capital punishment. The Senate Judicial Proceedings committee voted 6-5 to send Gov. Martin O'Malley's death penalty bill to the Senate floor, with Sen. Robert A. Zirkin, a Baltimore County Democrat, dropping his long-held opposition to repeal of capital punishment and providing the decisive vote.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2013
The General Assembly took an important step toward repealing Maryland's death penalty Thursday night when a key committee, for the first time in decades, approved a bill to end capital punishment. The Senate Judicial Proceedings committee voted 6-5 to send Gov. Martin O'Malley's death penalty bill to the Senate floor, with Sen. Robert A. Zirkin, a Baltimore County Democrat, dropping his long-held opposition to repeal of capital punishment and providing the decisive vote.
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NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1999
HIS MOTIVES WERE questioned and his judgment was criticized. Now, state Sen. Norman R. Stone Jr. has asked for a new Senate committee assignment.You may recall the events that led to the request.Legislation pending before the Judicial Proceedings Committee, on which Stone serves, would have allowed some victims of asbestos-related diseases to collect higher damages for pain and suffering.Stone, a Democrat who represents a working-class Dundalk district that is home to many victims of asbestos-related diseases, has for years been among the General Assembly's most staunch advocates for such pro-plaintiff legislation.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2012
Former state Sen. Walter M. Baker, who had served in the legislature representing the upper Eastern Shore for more than two decades and also had been a Cecil County attorney, died Tuesday of complications from diabetes at Christiana Hospital in Delaware. The longtime Elkton resident was 84. "Walter was a lifelong Democrat. He was from a large family that was rural and poor, and he grew up with a great sense of values," said Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller. "He was conservative, and loved the Eastern Shore and reflected its conservative values.
NEWS
March 6, 2003
Today's highlights 10 a.m.Senate meets, Senate chamber. 10 a.m.House of Delegates meets, House chamber. 1 p.m.Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee, hearing on drunken driving legislation, 2 East Miller Senate Office Building.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | March 22, 2009
A group of senators has added a twist to Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposal to take guns from the subjects of protective orders, voting to make it easier for domestic violence victims to get guns of their own. By a 6-5 decision, the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee amended a bill last week that would require a judge to confiscate firearms when granting a final protective order. They changed the legislation to include a provision that the judge help speed a petitioner's application for a permit to carry a weapon.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,sun reporter | November 15, 2006
Two Baltimore legislators are expected to take on new leadership posts when the Maryland Senate reconvenes in January, boosting diversity among those who control the body's powerful committee system. Sen. Joan Carter Conway, a veteran lawmaker who represents North Baltimore, is poised to take over the chairmanship of the Education, Health and Environmental Affairs Committee, and Sen. Lisa A. Gladden, who represents Northwest Baltimore and is considered an up-and-comer in the legislature, will become vice chairman of the Judicial Proceedings Committee.
NEWS
March 7, 2006
House of Delegates convenes at 10 a.m. Senate convenes at 10 a.m. Hearings of interest: The House Ways and Means Committee will hear testimony on legislation (HB 866) that would require counties to contract with child care providers and other programs if a school system does not have sufficient capacity to provide all-day kindergarten for all pupils in the 2007-2008 school year, as state law requires. The hearing is scheduled for 1 p.m. The Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee will consider legislation that would require motorists who receive probation for certain drunken-driving offenses to use an ignition interlock device that prevents the vehicle from being started if the device detects alcohol during a breath test.
NEWS
November 17, 2004
Senate leader sends message limiting debate State Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller's plan to remove Sen. James Brochin from the Judicial Proceedings Committee is the most egregious abuse of the public trust that anyone can imagine ("Miller weighs change in panel membership," Nov. 12). After listening to all of the issues surrounding the malpractice tort reform debate, Mr. Brochin courageously admitted the need for reform and openly stated his support for a special session to enact it. His punishment for leaving the Democratic fold on this issue will apparently be reassignment by Mr. Miller to the less conspicuous and sensitive Education, Health and Environmental Affairs Committee.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 8, 2004
A state Senate committee approved legislation yesterday that aims to provide financial relief to Columbia homeowners by imposing a 10 percent cap on rising property assessments in the planned community. The Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee unanimously approved the bill, drafted by Del. Shane E. Pendergrass. It was not amended. House Bill No. 566 would limit the effect of rising state property tax assessments on the annual charge that the Columbia Association imposes on its property owners.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2004
A solution to the rising malpractice insurance rates that have prompted some doctors to leave their practices remained uncertain in Annapolis yesterday after a Senate committee killed a reform bill backed by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., and the House of Delegates pressed forward with its own package. The most likely prospect this session are some "incremental steps" with the thorniest issues pushed off for study and possible action next year, said House Speaker Michael E. Busch after the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee struck down the governor's bill on a 7-4 vote.
NEWS
By Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Kimberly A.C. Wilson,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2004
The chances of enacting a prohibition on the sale of assault rifles in Maryland before the federal ban expires dimmed yesterday when a state lawmaker who had been the swing vote on a Senate committee announced his opposition. Sen. John A. Giannetti Jr. gave opponents of the ban the one-vote majority that would be needed to kill the measure in the Judicial Proceedings Committee. The move, which surprised gun control advocates and fellow senators courting his support, prompted the committee's chairman to postpone a vote until next week.
TOPIC
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2003
The Maryland Senate, over the past three months, debated a death penalty moratorium, whether to make it more difficult for prosecutors to obtain a death sentence, whether to ease the penalties for seriously ill patients who smoke marijuana and call it medicine, whether to let automated cameras catch speeders when police may be miles away. "None of this stuff would have had a chance in the last four years," says Sen. Alex X. Mooney, a Frederick County Republican and one of the most conservative voices in the General Assembly.
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