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NEWS
April 6, 1996
MONTGOMERY COUNTY District Court Judge Henry J. Monahan will have a chance to defend himself against allegations that he conducted lunch-hour liaisons with a prostitute in his judicial chambers. In a unanimous recommendation, the Commission on Judicial Disabilities has urged his removal from the bench, but no action will be taken prior to a hearing by the Court of Appeals, the state's highest court.That is how it should be. However grievous the charges against a judge, he or she, like any citizen, deserves a say in court.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2012
A Baltimore County judge has agreed to a five-day unpaid suspension, admitting that he was wrong to summarily find 28 people in contempt for courtroom disruptions — including two dozen fined and threatened with jail time after their cellphones sounded in his courtroom. District Judge Norman Stone III also will be on administrative probation for two years. Maryland's top court signed off late Friday on the agreement between Stone, 54, and the Commission on Judicial Disabilities.
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NEWS
February 25, 1997
JUDGES ARE of the law, not above the law. They must be held to the highest standards of conduct to ensure the integrity and effectiveness of the judicial system. If a judge runs afoul of the law, questions must be raised about how it will affect his decisions and performance on the bench.Such is the case with Circuit Court Judge Luke K. Burns Jr., who is reported to have twice ignored summonses to appear in court on speeding charges and is now charged with driving for nearly a year on a suspended driver's license.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2012
A Baltimore County district judge who has been under fire for his handling of a domestic violence case plans to retire next month, a spokesman for the Maryland court system said Tuesday. Judge Bruce S. Lamdin, 64, was removed in August from hearing cases pending an investigation of his remarks to a White Marsh woman during a court hearing last December. On Tuesday, he submitted a letter to Gov. Martin O'Malley saying he plans to step down Oct. 1, according to Terri Bolling, a spokeswoman for the Maryland court system.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | February 7, 2011
What happens if Judge W. Kennedy Boone III blows a .07 after lunch? Does he just return to the bench that day, or is the bailiff authorized to send him home with a designated driver? Does Judge Boone get to resume his duties, or does another judge of the Washington County Circuit Court relieve him of his docket? I realize that a .07 blood-alcohol level is not considered intoxication under Maryland law, but it's pretty close. I raise these questions because Judge Boone, who presides in Hagerstown, has been ordered to take a blood-alcohol test twice a day — once before he goes on the bench in the morning, and again after lunch.
NEWS
December 20, 1994
For a state that has taken great pains to shield its judges from undue political pressures, Maryland now faces a dilemma. It can beef up its system of judicial discipline or watch as public anger fuels pressure for impeaching a Baltimore County Circuit Court judge who imposed a light sentence and expressed sympathy for a man who killed his wife.At a press conference in Annapolis earlier this month, a majority of women legislators announced that they will initiate action in the General Assembly to remove Baltimore County Circuit Judge Robert Cahill from the bench.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Sun Staff Writer | November 18, 1994
Maryland's judicial disciplinary panel has reprimanded Baltimore County Circuit Judge Thomas J. Bollinger for comments that appeared "insensitive to women's rights" in his sentencing of a rapist in April 1993.Because the panel found no official misconduct in the sentencing, Judge Bollinger issued a statement saying that he had been exonerated. But advocates for women's rights said the unusual reprimand should be a warning to other judges about sensitivity to women's issues.The issue arose last year when Judge Bollinger gave Lawrence A. Gillette, a 44-year-old theater manager, probation before judgment for raping an 18-year-old employee who had passed out in his bed.The judge called the situation "the dream of a lot of males" and in comments at the sentencing and afterward, criticized Maryland law for making sex with an intoxicated person second-degree rape.
NEWS
December 16, 1994
If court officials needed evidence that the public is losing confidence in the judiciary's ability to discipline its own members, they had it in the announcement last week that women legislators will initiate action in the General Assembly to remove Baltimore County Circuit Judge Robert Cahill from the bench. Public anger over the light sentence he handed a man who shot and killed his wife shows no signs of going away.The press conference staged by several women legislators also illustrates the dangers of an ineffective system of judicial discipline: When the mechanism that is supposed to provide accountability functions too slowly, too secretively or too leniently, those failures fuel political pressure to act in other ways.
NEWS
February 25, 1995
At last Maryland has a debate on judicial accountability.Some state judges are grumbling at what appears to them unseemly haste, but plenty of citizens are delighted to watch the courts and the legislature competing to enact reforms first.Too many people have spent too many years waiting for signs of life from a toothless Commission on Judicial Disabilities. With virtually no staff or budget, there has been no public response to complaints and, thus, no way to refute critics who claim that the panel is simply not up to the task of imposing discipline on wayward judges.
NEWS
July 30, 1993
Judge Thomas J. Bollinger, some of his colleagues on the Circuit Court of Baltimore County and the Maryland Bar Association's Select Committee on Gender Equality all look a little silly in the latest episode linked to his highly publicized behavior in a rape case last spring.Judge Bollinger was roundly criticized then for his sentencing and his sentencing remarks. He sentenced the convicted man to a much less severe punishment than the state's guidelines' suggested as the minimum. He seemed to equate rape in this case with a minor property crime.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | February 7, 2011
What happens if Judge W. Kennedy Boone III blows a .07 after lunch? Does he just return to the bench that day, or is the bailiff authorized to send him home with a designated driver? Does Judge Boone get to resume his duties, or does another judge of the Washington County Circuit Court relieve him of his docket? I realize that a .07 blood-alcohol level is not considered intoxication under Maryland law, but it's pretty close. I raise these questions because Judge Boone, who presides in Hagerstown, has been ordered to take a blood-alcohol test twice a day — once before he goes on the bench in the morning, and again after lunch.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2010
The Maryland Court of Appeals has ordered a five-day unpaid suspension for a Charles County judge accused of letting the air out of car tire belonging to a woman who was a cleaning worker at the courthouse in La Plata. Two sheriff's deputies reported that they saw Circuit Judge Robert C. Nalley letting the air out of the right rear tire of a Toyota on Aug. 10, 2009. The judge explained that he was annoyed at the woman for having parked in a restricted area of the courthouse. Nalley was cited for tampering with a vehicle and pleaded guilty to the misdemeanor charge.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2004
Baltimore Circuit Judge Alfred Nance, reprimanded three years ago for inappropriate conduct, has been accused again by a state judicial disciplinary panel and faces a rare public hearing next month in connection with the charges. According to documents reviewed yesterday by The Sun, Nance is alleged to have made an "unwelcome" gesture to a city prosecutor by massaging her shoulder and is also charged with criticizing the way a prospective juror was wearing his yarmulke in court last year.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1998
Nearly a year after controversy led Baltimore County Circuit Judge Thomas J. Bollinger Sr. to disqualify himself from trials involving sexual offenses or domestic violence, the judge has quietly begun hearing those cases again.His move has angered one of the women's rights groups that last year called for Bollinger's resignation after he wiped out the battery conviction of a wife beater. The man had sought the change so he could have a clean record to join a country club."This is just another illustration of [his]
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1997
The city's nominating commission for Circuit Court judges yesterday recommended Baltimore Judge Kenneth Lavon Johnson for reappointment to the bench, despite a series of allegations that the 60-year-old judge had a record of intemperate behavior in court.Johnson, a controversial judge who won his seat by out polling appointed incumbents in 1982, has been under fire for his actions in a number of cases, four of which also are being investigated by the Maryland Commission on Judicial Disabilities.
NEWS
February 25, 1997
JUDGES ARE of the law, not above the law. They must be held to the highest standards of conduct to ensure the integrity and effectiveness of the judicial system. If a judge runs afoul of the law, questions must be raised about how it will affect his decisions and performance on the bench.Such is the case with Circuit Court Judge Luke K. Burns Jr., who is reported to have twice ignored summonses to appear in court on speeding charges and is now charged with driving for nearly a year on a suspended driver's license.
NEWS
October 5, 1995
IN THE NEXT two months, the Maryland Commission on Judicial Disabilities will take unprecedented steps to hold judges accountable for their actions. A circuit court judge in Towson and a district court judge in Rockville will be brought before the panel for misconduct. The allegations, and responses, will be aired in public. Sunshine is about to enter the judges' chambers.Judge Robert E. Cahill Sr., in Towson circuit court, created a furor with his comments in sentencing a trucker to a minimal sentence for killing his unfaithful wife.
NEWS
November 19, 1994
Long before the outraged protests against Judge Robert Cahill's light sentence and sympathetic remarks for a man who killed his wife, another Baltimore County Circuit Court judge ran afoul of public opinion when he gave a wrist-slap (probation before judgment) to an unrepentant rapist, then worried aloud that Maryland law was too strict in such matters. This week, 17 months later, Judge Thomas Bollinger voluntarily released the "private reprimand" he received from the state's Commission on Judicial Disabilities, along with his response.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Joan Jacobson and Michael Dresser and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | February 8, 1997
A Baltimore County judge's decision to expunge the conviction of a businessman who brutally beat his estranged wife could end up costing the state's entire judiciary a pay raise, some prominent women legislators warned yesterday.Del. Joan B. Pitkin, a member of the powerful House Appropriations Committee, said the action by Circuit Judge Thomas J. Bollinger Sr. "throws a real monkey wrench" into an effort to raise judges' pay by $9,000 a year."We have to send a message, and this is one way," said Pitkin, a Prince George's County Democrat.
NEWS
By George W. Liebmann | September 25, 1996
IT IS SAID THAT the road to hell is paved with good intentions. So it is that Maryland feminists, together with an eager governor and a pusillanimous legislature, incensed by ''insensitive'' comments by two Baltimore County judges in sentencing proceedings, have placed on the November ballot a proposal to enlarge the state's Commission on Judicial Disabilities.That would subject the commission to control by the state's governor -- an invasion of judicial independence virtually unparalleled in the common-law world.
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