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By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2010
An advisory committee on judicial campaign conduct has ruled that a challenger for a seat on the Baltimore County Circuit Court and his four incumbent opponents violated the panel's standards of conduct by posting derogatory messages about each other on Facebook and various Internet sites. The Maryland Judicial Campaign Conduct Committee Inc. found that candidate T. Scott Beckman and a slate of four incumbents known as the Baltimore Sitting Judges Slate — comprising Judges Jan M. Alexander, Sherrie R. Bailey, S. Ann Brobst and John J. Nagle III — violated a standard for "truthfulness and dignity" in campaign communications.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2010
An advisory committee on judicial campaign conduct has ruled that a challenger for a seat on the Baltimore County Circuit Court and his four incumbent opponents violated the panel's standards of conduct by posting derogatory messages about each other on Facebook and various Internet sites. The Maryland Judicial Campaign Conduct Committee Inc. found that candidate T. Scott Beckman and a slate of four incumbents known as the Baltimore Sitting Judges Slate — comprising Judges Jan M. Alexander, Sherrie R. Bailey, S. Ann Brobst and John J. Nagle III — violated a standard for "truthfulness and dignity" in campaign communications.
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NEWS
By JOSH MITCHELL and JOSH MITCHELL,SUN REPORTER | July 4, 2006
A lawyer who is running for Baltimore County Circuit Court has used campaign materials that misleadingly portray him as a judge, according to a report released yesterday by a newly formed judicial candidates ethics panel. The panel faulted Arthur M. Frank, a 51-year-old Owings Mills attorney, for using campaign materials emblazoned with "People's Choice For Judge Arthur Frank," with the words "Judge" and "Frank" in bigger type and a different color than the rest of the text. "Mr. Frank's campaign materials - campaign flyers, T-shirts, van and signage - inescapably and inaccurately suggest to many voters that he is already a judge," according to the Maryland Judicial Campaign Conduct Committee report.
NEWS
December 30, 2008
Here's a word of advice for Maryland judges: Don't count on a raise in 2009. In a matter of weeks, the General Assembly is going to face a choice of whether to increase judicial salaries $3 million a year. Considering the plight of the economy and the state budget, it's difficult to envision the legislators offering the bench anything more than their thanks and a hearty handshake. This is not the fault of the judges or of the commission that meets every four years to review judicial salaries.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2004
The Baltimore County Circuit Court judges trying to keep their jobs this coming election are all too aware that many people don't know the judicial candidates. They realize that when voters get to the low-placed ballot item March 2, many may pick the first four names they see. But in what appears to be an unprecedented step in the county, the sitting judges are fighting back, hoping to emblazon the names Ballou-Watts, Levitz, Souder and Turnbull into the minds of the electorate. Their method: a good, old-fashioned jingle.
NEWS
February 25, 1996
The five candidates for Howard County Circuit Court judgeships and five candidates for seats on the county school board will appear at forums and meetings this week.The candidates in the March 5 judicial primary are Circuit Judges Donna Hill Staton and Diane Leasure, District Judge Lenore R. Gelfman and attorneys Jay Fred Cohen and Jonathan Scott Smith.Candidates for school board are Virginia Charles, Jane Schuchardt, Vincent Pugliese, Arthur Neal Willoughby and Francine Wishnick.The forums are:* Tuesday, 12:30 p.m.: Judicial candidates at the Republican Women's Club meeting, Hunan Manor Restaurant, 7091 Deepage Drive, Columbia.
NEWS
By ANDREW A. GREEN and ANDREW A. GREEN,SUN REPORTER | May 2, 2006
Prominent members of Maryland's legal community, worried that hotly contested elections for judges could erode public confidence in the judiciary, announced a set of voluntary conduct standards yesterday that they hope will preserve the dignity of the office. At the behest of Chief Judge Robert M. Bell of the Maryland Court of Appeals, former U.S. Attorney George Beall and Stephen H. Sachs, a former U.S. attorney and state attorney general, led a committee of attorneys, academics and former politicians to create the standards and ascertain when they have been violated.
NEWS
By George D. Solter | November 29, 2002
The recent 5-4 decision of the U.S. Supreme Court in Republican Party of Minnesota vs. White makes more urgent the need to remove Maryland's Circuit Court judges from contested elections. In this case, the court declared unconstitutional, as a violation of the First Amendment, a Minnesota rule of judicial conduct prohibiting judicial candidates from announcing their views on disputed or political issues during a campaign for election to the bench. Maryland has a similar rule that, under the Supreme Court's decision, is also unconstitutional and therefore void.
NEWS
By LAURA CADIZ and LAURA CADIZ,SUN REPORTER | July 12, 2006
Judicial elections ought to be conducted differently from all the "rough and tumble of politics," says Stephen H. Sachs, co-chair of the newly formed Maryland Judicial Campaign Conduct Committee. In an attempt to assure that the judicial races are civilized, the bi-partisan committee is asking judicial candidates to endorse a set of standards for impartiality, truthfulness and dignity. Two Howard County candidates -- sitting Circuit Judges Louis A. Becker and Richard S. Bernhardt -- have agreed to the standards.
NEWS
May 2, 2006
Judicial independence and impartiality are under assault from many directions these days. Supreme Court nominees are bullied into expressing their philosophies as judicial Pablum lest one interest group or another take offense. The failure of state and federal judges to knuckle under to pressure from Congress last year on the Terri Schiavo case resulted in threats of retribution. A Maryland lawmaker even tried recently to have a Baltimore Circuit Court judge removed from office because she ruled against the state ban on gay marriage.
NEWS
July 13, 2006
Trust the people to elect our judges The Sun's whining over judicial elections is based on the faulty premise that voters are incapable of casting an informed ballot ("Courting votes," editorial, July 6). And in fact, the election process has been helpful, not harmful, to African-American judicial candidates. For example, former Judges Joseph C. Howard, William H. Murphy Jr. and Kenneth L. Johnson were all popularly elected to the Circuit Court of Baltimore City. And this year, three judicial challengers in Baltimore City and Baltimore County are African-American.
NEWS
By LAURA CADIZ and LAURA CADIZ,SUN REPORTER | July 12, 2006
Judicial elections ought to be conducted differently from all the "rough and tumble of politics," says Stephen H. Sachs, co-chair of the newly formed Maryland Judicial Campaign Conduct Committee. In an attempt to assure that the judicial races are civilized, the bi-partisan committee is asking judicial candidates to endorse a set of standards for impartiality, truthfulness and dignity. Two Howard County candidates -- sitting Circuit Judges Louis A. Becker and Richard S. Bernhardt -- have agreed to the standards.
NEWS
July 6, 2006
Whether Arthur M. Frank becomes a Circuit Court judge is up to Baltimore County voters, but he has already established a precedent. He's the first political candidate to be chastised for unethical conduct by the Maryland Judicial Campaign Conduct Committee, a nonprofit, bipartisan group that is trying to enforce a voluntary code for would-be and incumbent judges running for office. The incident should reinforce public skepticism over how Maryland selects Circuit Court judges. Mr. Frank, 50, is one of six candidates running for four seats on the Baltimore County bench.
NEWS
By JOSH MITCHELL and JOSH MITCHELL,SUN REPORTER | July 4, 2006
A lawyer who is running for Baltimore County Circuit Court has used campaign materials that misleadingly portray him as a judge, according to a report released yesterday by a newly formed judicial candidates ethics panel. The panel faulted Arthur M. Frank, a 51-year-old Owings Mills attorney, for using campaign materials emblazoned with "People's Choice For Judge Arthur Frank," with the words "Judge" and "Frank" in bigger type and a different color than the rest of the text. "Mr. Frank's campaign materials - campaign flyers, T-shirts, van and signage - inescapably and inaccurately suggest to many voters that he is already a judge," according to the Maryland Judicial Campaign Conduct Committee report.
NEWS
May 2, 2006
Judicial independence and impartiality are under assault from many directions these days. Supreme Court nominees are bullied into expressing their philosophies as judicial Pablum lest one interest group or another take offense. The failure of state and federal judges to knuckle under to pressure from Congress last year on the Terri Schiavo case resulted in threats of retribution. A Maryland lawmaker even tried recently to have a Baltimore Circuit Court judge removed from office because she ruled against the state ban on gay marriage.
NEWS
By ANDREW A. GREEN and ANDREW A. GREEN,SUN REPORTER | May 2, 2006
Prominent members of Maryland's legal community, worried that hotly contested elections for judges could erode public confidence in the judiciary, announced a set of voluntary conduct standards yesterday that they hope will preserve the dignity of the office. At the behest of Chief Judge Robert M. Bell of the Maryland Court of Appeals, former U.S. Attorney George Beall and Stephen H. Sachs, a former U.S. attorney and state attorney general, led a committee of attorneys, academics and former politicians to create the standards and ascertain when they have been violated.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | August 27, 1992
The fate of two Republican lawyers nominated for federal judgeships in Baltimore may ride with President Bush's re-election bid.Bethesda lawyer William D. Quarles and Assistant U.S. Attorney Katharine J. Armentrout are among 50 judicial candidates awaiting confirmation, a Senate Judiciary Committee aide said. But the committee, which sends candidates to the full Senate for confirmation, is expected to forward only eight to 10 nominees during the four-week session that begins Sept. 8, the aide said.
NEWS
March 24, 2001
FOR ALL HIS talk of bipartisanship and unifying the country, President Bush is sending signals that he is in no mood to compromise his staunch conservatism on judicial appointments. Two examples: The administration has dropped the American Bar Association from the process of screening federal judicial candidates. And, Mr. Bush has withdrawn former President Clinton's nomination of Judge Roger L. Gregory to the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, which hears lower-court appeals from Maryland and four other states.
NEWS
By DAVID G. SAVAGE and DAVID G. SAVAGE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 24, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court took another step yesterday toward transforming state elections for judges from nonpartisan, low-key affairs into big-money contests that resemble partisan political races. The justices let stand a lower court's free-speech ruling in a Minnesota case that appears to void rules in about 30 states that forbid candidates for judgeships from personally soliciting money or from identifying themselves as Republicans or Democrats. Minnesota's attorney general, backed by a broad coalition of judges, corporations and legal groups, had urged the high court to preserve these rules.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 15, 2005
With Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist promising to press this week for a vote on two of President Bush's most controversial stalled judicial nominees, the normally staid U.S. Senate is bracing for what could be an ugly, and potentially historic, procedural clash. Republicans have cast the looming fight as a matter of basic fairness. Legal and political experts say GOP complaints about blocked judges and partisan stalling tactics ignore the key point that both parties broadly used less-visible maneuvers to stop judicial nominees as the feuds over the federal courts escalated in the 1990s.
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