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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
An appeals court on Wednesday sanctioned the police's use of genetic material obtained in one investigation to solve other crimes, but agreed with attorneys for a burglar that questions surround the little known practice. Three judges of the Court of Special Appeals upheld the burglary conviction of George Varriale, a homeless Anne Arundel County man, which was based in part on DNA that he had voluntarily given to police to clear himself in a rape investigation . Genetic material obtained by police with consent of a suspect is not subject to the same legal protections as that compelled from people arrested for certain crimes - the profile need not be expunged from law enforcement databases if the suspect is cleared of wrongdoing, for example.
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SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | July 15, 2014
Let's be honest. The hardest thing about evaluating the Orioles organization at the nonmathematical halfway point in the 2014 season is trying to do that without depending on the two most obvious measuring sticks. It would be easy to simply look at the American League East standings and the Orioles' strong performance over the past few weeks and give the club an "A" for overcoming several major obstacles to take control of the division. And it's always tempting to grade on a curve that takes into account just how unsuccessful this team was for so long.
BUSINESS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2014
The founder of an embattled Sparks-based insurance company appears to have been plotting to kill a Delaware judge overseeing the liquidation of his business, recording himself on a trip to scout out his targets and acquiring a cache of weapons, federal authorities allege in court filings. Jeffrey B. Cohen, 39, of Reisterstown was arrested last month after he was indicted on charges that he schemed to make it appear that his company, Indemnity Insurance Corp., which insured bars and nightclubs, had millions of dollars in cash it did not possess.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
A Baltimore jury failed to reach a verdict Tuesday in a high-profile murder case, leading a city judge to declare a mistrial in city prosecutors' first battle with what they say is a murderous group within the Black Guerrilla Family gang. A juror who declined to give her name said a majority on the panel had been leaning toward acquitting David Hunter, an alleged BGF member who was charged with murder in the broad-daylight killing of heroin dealer Henry Mills on Greenmount Avenue three years ago. At its heart, Hunter's case was a simple matter: The jury was asked to weigh the credibility of eyewitnesses to Mills' June 2011 death.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
James Rogers Miller Jr., a former state delegate from Montgomery County who spent 15 years as a federal district judge in Baltimore, died of congestive heart failure June 25 at HeartFields Assisted Living at Easton. He was 83. "Judge Miller was an outstanding and brilliant jurist," said U.S. District Judge Ellen L. Hollander, who clerked for Judge Miller in the 1970s. "He tirelessly and skillfully pursued the just resolution of every case. He had an unwavering commitment to the rule of law and an uncompromising integrity.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 26, 2014
People of a certain age will appreciate this: Charles G. "Chuck" Bernstein, who loved being a Baltimore circuit judge so much that he made a federal case out of his mandatory retirement at 70, appears to have been elected a judge again. If the tally from Tuesday's primary holds up, Bernstein will return to the bench at the age of 75. He'll probably ride his bike to work, too. The Orphans' Court of Baltimore City does not require its three judges to retire at a particular age. (It didn't even require a law degree until four years ago.)
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
A Baltimore judge ruled this week that she will not enforce her decision to dismiss a multimillion-dollar lawsuit filed by the former developers of the "Superblock" until an appellate court rules on the case. City officials expressed disappointment with the ruling, which they said could further slow development of the long-stalled project on Baltimore's west side. "It's always frustrating to me when the legal process is protracted and it prevents meaningful development in the city," Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said.
NEWS
By Matthew VanDyke | June 17, 2014
Less than three years after the withdrawal of U.S. forces from Iraq, the black flag of an al-Qaida inspired terrorist group flies above several Iraqi cities. The Iraqi army, despite years of training by the United States, has disintegrated and abandoned bases and weaponry to these terrorists (and in some cases even supports them). Iran, enemy of the United States for more than three decades and a constant threat to international security, is increasingly supplanting American influence in Iraq with its own and exerts significant influence in Syria as well.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2014
For the first time in eight years, Baltimore's judges face a challenger at the polls, a former city prosecutor who aims to knock veteran judge Alfred Nance from the bench. Page Croyder, 58, said she is running for election because of what she sees as Nance's lack of decorum on the bench and poor treatment of women who come into his courtroom. "I'm running because I care about the judiciary and I think people deserve judges who are going to treat them respectfully," Croyder said.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Jonathon Owen has laced into the Chicago Manual of Style at his blog Arrant Pedantry  over the fading  nauseous/nauseated  distinction . His post prompts me to think about how we go about makling usage distinctions. But first let's dispose of nauseous/nauseated . Like a good little copy editor, I started out insisting that nauseous  must mean "causing nausea," not "experiencing nausea," Woody Allen's dialogue notwithstanding.  But I have long since given up on it, for the reasons that Jonathon Owen states: "If 99 percent of the population uses  nauseous  in the sense of  having nausea , then who's to say that they're wrong?
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