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NEWS
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
A Baltimore judge this week ruled to allow city prosecutors to withhold identifying witness information from defendants in the sweeping case against alleged members of the Black Guerrilla Family gang. Judge Sylvester B. Cox on Tuesday granted a protective order, requested by the state's attorney's office, on any materials that could expose witnesses to harm or intimidation, after hearing a detective describe the fears witnesses had about cooperating with the investigation. Forty-eight suspects accused of being members of the BGF gang, which operated a violent, widespread drug trade in the city and corrupted the Baltimore City Detention Center, were indicted last November.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
The founder of a Baltimore County-based company that provided insurance to nightclubs and bars who was previously charged with misleading regulators now faces additional charges. The new charges of wire fraud and money laundering mean Jeffrey Cohen, the former CEO of Indemnity Insurance Corp., could face a stiffer sentence if convicted. Officials said he could be sentenced to an additional 120 years imprisonment if convicted on all counts. He was previously facing 15 years in prison for each of five counts of making false statements to an insurance regulator.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2014
A man accused of fatally stabbing his ex-girlfriend in 2013 was unable to attend his own trial in Baltimore County Tuesday after he refused to wear a stun cuff. Jeffrey Matthew Shiflett, 35, charged with murdering Katie Hadel, 33, missed opening statements after Circuit Judge Ruth Ann Jakubowski ordered that he wear an ankle bracelet that can deliver an electric shock. Jakubowski made the order after Shiflett screamed the judge's first name repeatedly and attempted to enter her chambers as he was being escorted to the courtroom before the trial.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
A Harford County judge who helped lead this week's Maryland Judiciary summit on care for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender youth in the state's foster care system said the event was a success and could lead to substantive improvements in the future. "It went very well. We had excellent speakers," said Judge William O. Carr, a Harford County Circuit Court administrative judge and chair of the outreach and programming subcommittee of the state Foster Care Court Improvement Project.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
Veteran defense attorney Russell A. Neverdon Sr. has lost another battle in his effort to get his name on the November ballot as a candidate for Baltimore state's attorney. Baltimore Circuit Judge Martin P. Welch ruled against Neverdon on Tuesday in Neverdon's appeal of a ruling by city elections officials denying him a place on the ballot. Elections officials found that he had fallen more than 1,000 signatures short of the 4,160 that he needed to challenge Democrat Marilyn Mosby as an independent candidate.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
A federal judge in Baltimore ordered Maryland elections officials to adopt an online absentee voting tool in time for this year's general election, despite warnings from computer security experts that the system could lead to voter fraud. The ruling was sought by a group of disabled voters and the National Federation of the Blind, who say the tool will make it easier for people with disabilities to cast ballots without relying on another person. "The court today has protected the fundamental rights of voters with disabilities, including the rights to equal access and to a secret ballot," said Mark Riccobono, president of the federation.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has appointed a three-member panel to distribute up to $3 million to the owners of historic properties whose tax bills in coming years will be higher than what government officials told them to expect. Retired Baltimore City Circuit Judge  John M.  Glynn, City Auditor Robert McCarty, and City Solicitor George Nilson will decide which owners will get the checks, which will cover portions of up to nine years of future tax bills. About 75 property owners submitted applications that could make them eligible to receive the checks, city officials said.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 1, 2014
Nobody asked me, but… A judge who orders an electric shock to silence a criminal defendant who refuses to shut up during a court proceeding has relinquished his eligibility for retirement duty on the bench. This is alleged to have happened when Charles County Circuit Judge Robert C. Nalley, who hit mandatory retirement a year ago, told a deputy sheriff to zap a chatterbox defendant with the "stun cuff" he was wearing at the time. (A few years ago, the same judge admitted to a Southern Maryland newspaper that he had deflated a tire of a car parked near the courthouse in La Plata.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2014
A ruling by a federal judge in a lawsuit filed by federal employees over the government shutdown last fall has given the workers hope that they could soon be eligible for a payout. U.S. Court of Federal Claims Chief Judge Patricia Campbell-Smith declined to dismiss the lawsuit brought by some 2,000 workers who were deemed essential during the during the 16-day shutdown. The plaintiffs worked through the shutdown but didn't get paid on time for their labor. Campbell-Smith wrote in an opinion that the federal government violated the Fair Labor Standards Act, but she didn't go as far as saying that the government needed to pay the plaintiffs.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
A veteran defense attorney running an independent campaign for Baltimore state's attorney argued in Circuit Court Friday that city election workers "messed up" when they ruled he did not have enough signatures to appear on the November ballot.  "Just because they say it's so, don't make it so," said Edward Smith Jr., the attorney for candidate Russell A. Neverdon Sr. "Each and every [signature] they looked at, they messed up. " Judge Martin P. Welch said he will postpone ruling on the case until after he hears more evidence next Friday.  The city's Board of Elections said earlier this monrth that Neverdon fell more than 1,000 signatures short of the 4,160 needed to challenge Democrat Marilyn J. Mosby on the general election ballot.
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