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NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Sun Staff Writer | June 4, 1994
A federal judge has fired the attorney handling the appeal of Maryland death row inmate Tyrone Delano Gilliam, saying the defense lawyer paid too much attention to the execution of the late John F. Thanos and not enough to his client.U.S. District Judge William M. Nickerson Wednesday denied the public defender's motion to appoint Jerome H. "Jay" Nickerson of Rockville to handle Gilliam's appeal in federal court. Jay Nickerson, who is not related to the judge, had handled the appeal in Maryland courts.
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NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2001
The attorney for a Baltimore man tried yesterday to have his murder trial postponed for two weeks because of pretrial publicity, but city Circuit Judge Wanda Keyes Heard denied the motion. Jury selection is scheduled to begin this morning in the trial of Courtney M. Noakes, 20, who is accused of killing Branch Brown, 24, of the 4100 block of Hyden Court in Brooklyn. Brown was shot in the head July 15 last year. The case marks the third time that Noakes has faced trial on murder charges.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | April 2, 2009
A Carroll County judge has stepped aside from hearing traffic charges against a man who went to prison for his role in a fatal 1998 crash and went on to receive a half-dozen speeding tickets in the years since his release. Judge Marc C. Rasinsky recused himself Wednesday in the District Court trial of Frederick Henry Hensen Jr., citing an article Sunday in The Baltimore Sun on Hensen's history of speeding and other driving violations. Hensen got tickets before and after his involvement in the crash that killed middle school teacher Geraldine Wu. Hensen was convicted of manslaughter by automobile in 1999, along with another man who participated in a road race on Route 140 that ended in the crash that killed Wu. A third man pleaded guilty in 1998.
NEWS
March 2, 1994
The heavy backlog of cases in Harford Circuit Court has long been a problem that has gone unaddressed. Defendant rights to a speedy trial have been compromised, resulting in constitutional appeals to overturn clear but belated convictions.The caseload for four judges sitting in the Bel Air courthouse has soared from 4,000 cases for four judges a decade ago to nearly 7,000 last year. The number of criminal cases filed each year has doubled since 1983, when the fourth Harford judge was added.
NEWS
October 19, 1994
Having weathered icy roads, a truck driver returns home to find his wife in bed with another man. Her fate? Shot dead by her husband, after several hours of drinking and arguing. His fate? Eighteen months in jail and the sympathy of Baltimore Circuit Judge Robert E. Cahill, who all but justified capital punishment -- vigilante style -- for adultery by intoning at the sentencing, "I seriously wonder how many married men . . . would have the strength to walk away without inflicting some corporal punishment."
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | October 11, 1994
A man called a "monster" by the state's attorney has failed to persuade a Carroll judge to grant him a new trial on child sexual abuse charges.In a written order filed late Friday, Carroll Circuit Judge Luke K. Burns Jr. said he disagreed with the 44-year-old Westminster man's claim that his defense attorney's incompetence made his 1993 jury trial unfair.The man -- whose name is being withheld to protect the privacy of his three young victims -- said Edward T. Barry, then Carroll assistant public defender, failed to properly file a motion requesting that the case be broken into three trials, one for each of the accusers.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2001
A judicial disciplinary panel issued a stinging public reprimand of Baltimore Circuit Judge Alfred Nance yesterday, charging that the judge acted in "inappropriate," "undignified" and "demeaning" ways toward women in his court and private chambers. The Commission on Judicial Disabilities also criticized Nance for being "rude" and "hostile" to lawyers representing the University of Maryland Medical System in a medical malpractice case. Nance did not respond to messages left at his home and office yesterday seeking comment, and his lawyer, Alvin I. Frederick, declined to comment.
FEATURES
By CARLETON JONES | December 8, 1991
In the late fall of 1941, a murder case involving two 16-year-old boys hit the front pages of newspapers nationwide. The duo was charged with the robbery-killing of a prominent Washington tax expert in his Leesburg, Va., home. They escaped temporarily by hurrying across the Potomac River to Frederick County but were caught later near their home base in Kentucky.Today, such a case might not make the same splash except in the state or locale where it occurred. Fifty years ago there wasn't a parade of incessant violence on television, in the movies and out on the streets.
NEWS
By Raymond L. Sanchez and Raymond L. Sanchez,Evening Sun Staff | February 15, 1991
Shortly after a co-defendant pleaded guilty in the April 19 slaying of a City Jail inmate for his denim jacket, a man charged with robbery and murder in the incident exploded in anger and threatened the judge."
NEWS
By Madison Park | May 21, 2008
A veteran Baltimore County prosecutor has been appointed as the newest District Court judge in Harford County. Harford County resident Susan Hower Hazlett was selected by Gov. Martin O'Malley last week to serve a 10-year term on the bench, filling a vacancy created when Judge Angela Eaves was elevated to the county's Circuit Court. Hazlett, 46, will be one of three female judges in the county. After graduating from law school at the University of Baltimore, Hazlett worked for eight months at an investment firm before leaving for the Baltimore County state's attorney's office, where she has remained for 20 years.
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