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By Nick Madigan | nick.madigan@baltsun.com | March 26, 2010
Two organizations that foster women's legal rights filed a complaint Thursday with a panel that disciplines the judiciary, asking it to investigate a Baltimore County judge who performed a wedding ceremony between a woman and the man accused of beating her, and then acquitted him. The House Of Ruth Maryland and the Women's Law Center of Maryland called the behavior of District Judge G. Darrell Russell Jr. "grossly inappropriate." On March 10, when a 29-year-old Middle River man, Frederick D. Wood, appeared in an Essex courtroom on a charge that he had beaten his fiancee, Russell acquiesced to Wood's lawyer's suggestion that his client leave to obtain a marriage license.
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NEWS
April 30, 1995
"There is nobody above the law," according to Judge J. Frederick Motz, chief federal district judge in Maryland. We agree. U.S. Magistrate Judge James E. Kenkel doesn't seem to, PTC though. Nor, apparently, do some senior officers of the Maryland State Police.How else to explain the failure to punish, one way or another, Judge Kenkel's unacceptable conduct while driving last January? Letting him get away with failure to stop for a police officer and using a siren while fleeing into a limited-access garage is privileged treatment, pure and simple.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2003
ROCKVILLE - A remorseless Benjamin Sifrit was sentenced to 38 years in prison yesterday by a judge who called him "a butcher" and said he disagreed with the jury that found the former Navy SEAL guilty of only one murder in Ocean City last year. Montgomery County Circuit Judge Paul H. Weinstein suggested that he was itching to give Sifrit more prison time for what the judge termed the "thrill killing" of insurance executive Martha Crutchley, 51. But a jury declined April 9 to return a verdict of first-degree murder against Sifrit, instead finding him guilty of second-degree murder in Crutchley's death and clearing him in the killing of her boyfriend, mortgage banker Joshua Ford, 32. The judge said it was "one of the few instances in 20 years that I disagreed with the jury's verdict."
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | September 24, 1993
Washington. -- What would I want as the foundation of a truly just society? I would want judges who are not beholden to whatever politicians are in power, and who cannot be intimidated by the political, social, racial or religious passions of the day.I am provoked to say this by the laudable actions of the U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals in the case of John Demjanjuk, who has long been demonized by ''Nazi hunters'' and a few U.S. officials as ''Ivan the...
NEWS
By Don Markus | don.markus@baltsun.com | January 31, 2010
Alice "Gail" Clark isn't sure how her life would have turned out had her husband, John, not read up about James Rouse's planned community while attending graduate school at Howard University in the late 1960s. They were living in Washington, where Alice Clark was a schoolteacher. She later would become a school counselor. "I probably would have stayed in D.C. and retired as a school counselor," Clark said last week. In 1970, Clark, her husband and their infant daughter, Elizabeth, moved to Columbia.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Sun Staff Writer | October 27, 1994
Women's groups here and across the county were galvanized last week when a Baltimore County Judge sentenced a Parkton trucker to 18 months on work release for killing his wife after he found her in bed with another man.But lawyers involved in domestic cases and advocates for women's causes say the case is symptomatic of a Baltimore County bench that is overwhelming male, white, middle-aged and often insensitive to women's issues."
NEWS
October 25, 1994
"I seriously wonder how many married men. . . would have the strength to walk away without inflicting some corporal punishment."Those words have brought Judge Robert E. Cahill national notoriety -- and justly so. A 18-month work-release sentence for a man who fatally shot his wife after finding her in bed with another man might not be surprising from a judge in some benighted part of the world where men still hold sway over their wives' lives and fate. From a judge in Maryland such a sentence -- and the public sympathy from Judge Cahill -- is unacceptable.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | January 8, 2010
A Baltimore judge refused Thursday to set a man free before his Jan. 26 attempted-murder trial, despite having thrown out a key - and possibly the only - piece of evidence against him last week because it had been altered by police. "That doesn't change the public safety component," said Circuit Court Judge John P. Miller in explaining his decision to let an $800,000 bail stand, after it was revealed that an officer altered a photo of the defendant to get positive witness identification.
NEWS
December 13, 2012
One has to wonder about the mental acuity of a judge having the power of life and death in his hands who bans a "Choose Life" vanity plate because there is no "Choose Death" vanity plate ("Judge: 'Choose Life' license plate unconstitutional," Dec. 12). Just when I am about to cancel my subscription to The Sun for lack of interest, it publishes something that makes me double over in laughter and cry in shame at the same time. God, what have we wrought? Gary Gamber, Reisterstown
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2012
Winning over Howie Mandel, Nick Cannon and thousands of other American TV viewers has its perks. Just ask Lulu, the "pleasantly plump" 27-year-old pole dancer from Hanover who auditioned on"America's Got Talent"earlier this month. She'll be a guest-judge for the first-ever Pole Dance Competition at Scores Baltimore Gentlemen's Club tonight. Lulu will be available for photos and autographs after the competition. The contest starts at 9 p.m., and will feature dancers from "all over," according to a press release from Scores.
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