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NEWS
August 4, 1991
With the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People now out front in tortured opposition to Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas, the country is in for another "borking." This new word in the political vocabulary derives from the massive public relations campaign in 1987 that led to Senate rejection of Judge Robert H. Bork, the only out-and-out defeat the liberal establishment ever administered to President Reagan.Like Mr. Bork, U.S. Appeals Court Judge Thomas is a self-proclaimed conservative, an opponent of goal-setting affirmative action, a putative opponent of the Roe v. Wade abortion rights decision and a man who supposedly would continue the Supreme Court's massive swing to the right.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
Former Baltimore City Circuit Judge Basil A. Thomas, whose legal career spanned more than seven decades, died Friday of congestive heart failure at the Blakehurst Retirement Community in Towson. He was 98. "He's my guy. Basil lived a long and full life that was very productive, and you can't ask for any more than that," said retired Chief Judge Robert M. Bell of the Maryland Court of Appeals. "He was a very interesting man and the consummate professional. For him, the rule of law was paramount.
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NEWS
By Lyle Denniston | August 4, 1991
Washington. -- If Americans have the patience to listen to the often highly abstract debate that already surrounds the legal views of Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas, they will hear the modern echoes of a controversy that goes back well over two centuries.It is no less than a debate over where Americans get their rights: the source of their fundamental rights as human beings and the origins of their legal rights as citizens of this country.The debate got started after President Bush picked Judge Thomas, of the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, to replace retiring Justice Thurgood Marshall.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | March 10, 2007
Baltimore Circuit Court Judge Thomas Ward says he is "98 percent" recovered from his recent bout with a neurological disorder, Guillain-Barre syndrome. At age 80, he'll be back on the bench next month. Although technically retired, he also has a 1,600-acre cattle and timber farm that spreads out along the Cheat River in West Virginia to keep him busy, as well as his daily Baltimore walks, which take him from his Bolton Hill home to Pennsylvania Station, where he likes to watch the city's ever-increasing passenger train traffic pass.
FEATURES
By Mike Royko and Mike Royko,Tribune Media Services | October 9, 1991
JUDGE THOMAS, a former assistant has said that you subjected her to sexual harassment. Would you please respond to these allegations.""Senator, I recall my grandfather once saying to me, 'Clarence,' -- you see he always called me Clarence, since that was my name -- he said, 'Clarence, why did you pull that girl's pigtails?' ""Excuse me, Judge, but I'm not sure I understand what you're talking about.""I was talking about my grandfather, a poor but proud man, of little formal education but great wisdom and insight into the human condition.
NEWS
By Arch Parsons and Arch Parsons,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 7, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, by far Washington's largest lobbying coalition, will launch an all-out campaign today against Senate confirmation of Judge Clarence Thomas, President Bush's nominee for a seat on the Supreme Court.The Leadership Conference -- the coalition of 185 organizations that led a successful campaign against seating Judge Robert H. Bork on the Supreme Court in 1987 -- has received the go-ahead from its executive committee to seek the undoing of Judge Thomas, the black conservative who now sits as a judge of the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia.
NEWS
By Arch Parsons and Arch Parsons,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 1, 1991
WASHINGTON -- With only a single dissenting vote, the board of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People decided yesterday to fight "with all the resources we have" the nomination of Judge Clarence Thomas to the Supreme Court, giving opposition to his confirmation a major boost.Later in the day, the AFL-CIO Executive Council announced that the labor alliance also will oppose Judge Thomas' confirmation.The NAACP's board chairman, Dr. William F. Gibson, a Columbia, S.C., dentist, said at a news conference that Judge Thomas' "reactionary philosophical approach to a number of issues, not the least of which is affirmative action," was "simply inconsistent with the historical positions taken by the NAACP."
NEWS
July 23, 1991
How does Rep. Kweisi Mfume, Maryland's only black member of Congress, assess the Clarence Thomas nomination to the Supreme Court? In a meeting yesterday with Sun editorial writers, the Baltimore lawmaker made these assertions:* It is his "gut feeling" that Judge Thomas, a black conservative nominated to replace Justice Thurgood Marshall, will be confirmed.* The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, taking the same path as the National Urban League, will wind up taking no position ("the best position for civil rights organizations")
NEWS
By Arch Parsons and Arch Parsons,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 16, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A major national Hispanic organization issued a report yesterday indirectly but sharply criticizing Judge Clarence Thomas, President Bush's nominee for the Supreme Court.The report was the latest indication that Hispanic opposition to Judge Thomas' confirmation by the Senate is growing and becoming more severe.The Washington-based National Council of La Raza distributed here and at its annual convention in Houston a report describing as "extremely poor" and very nearly discriminatory the performance of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission on behalf of Hispanics while Judge Thomas was the commission's chairman.
NEWS
By Arch Parsons and Arch Parsons,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 11, 1991
WASHINGTON -- While the 14-member Senate Judiciary Committee presses Judge Clarence Thomas to explain his qualifications for the Supreme Court, all 100 senators are under rising pressure to explain their views of Judge Thomas.There were these signs of activity yesterday:* About 300 black pastors, representing congregations totaling more than a million churchgoers in 30 states, held a rally on the steps of the Supreme Court and then personally lobbied their senators to support confirmation of President Bush's nominee as a Supreme Court justice.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1999
WASHINGTON -- When he drew the last great antitrust case of the 20th century, Thomas Penfield Jackson swore he wouldn't let United States vs. Microsoft become his legal Vietnam.He knew what happened to David Edelstein, the New York judge who postponed retirement in 1971 to take over a case against IBM that dragged on for 13 years.He knew what happened to Judge Harold Greene, who played baby sitter to a million documents during the Justice Department's eight-year assault on AT&T.Instead, the courtly 62-year-old Jackson whipped through the Microsoft case in just 76 trial days.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 3, 1994
WASHINGTON -- A new and sharply critical book about Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas suggests that it was more than likely that he lied under oath to the Senate Judiciary Committee three years ago, but one of his closest friends retorted that "there's nothing there."The long-awaited and heavily promoted book by two Wall Street Journal reporters draws no hard and fast conclusions about who told the truth in the famous televised confrontation in 1991 between Judge Thomas, then a nominee to the court, and law professor Anita F. Hill after she accused him of sexually harassing her and he flatly denied it.But, in the opening pages of their book, "Strange Justice: The Selling of Clarence Thomas," Jane Mayer and Jill Abramson say that they have found after more than two years of research that "the preponderance of the evidence suggests" that Judge Thomas "did lie under oath."
NEWS
By GARLAND L. THOMPSON and GARLAND L. THOMPSON,Garland L. Thompson writes editorials for The Sun | October 19, 1991
The votes are tallied and the statements of victory are history. Clarence Thomas, a one-man civil-rights wrecking crew during most of the 1980s, now goes on the Supreme Court.One of the more interesting features of debate was the use of polls to decide who really spoke for America's blacks. Before Oklahoma law professor Anita Hill's sex-harassment complaints were aired, polls showed black support for another black man taking Thurgood Marshall's seat, but little support for his stance. Then Judge Thomas' critics began to report on his record.
FEATURES
October 16, 1991
Though all three Baltimore network affiliates went live to capture the dramatic Senate vote on Clarence Thomas yesterday evening, only Channel 2 pre-empted regular programming during the day to air Senate debate on the matter. Despite this shift from the weekend, when much fuller coverage was given to sexual harassment charges against Judge Thomas, few local viewers complained about the reduction, according to officials at Channels 2, 11 and 13.There was a high level of viewer interest in the matter, however.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 16, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Despite real fear at the White House that Anita F. Hill's charges of sexual harassment might prove too powerful for Clarence Thomas to overcome in the Senate, there was apparently never any serious consideration of what President Bush should do if the charges were found to be true.According to numerous inside accounts, Judge Thomas' initial denial of the charges to Sen. John C. Danforth, R-Mo., was accepted on faith by President Bush and many others in the administration, largely because the charges seemed contrary to what they knew of the man."
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 16, 1991
WASHINGTON -- In the end, the votes that put Clarence Thomas on the highest court in the land came the old-fashioned way -- one by one, with a subdued procession of ayes and noes in a room filled with tired, silent people.It was a low-tech ending to a process scorned as a "high-tech lynching" by the man who emerged as its winner. And, even though the moment had the drama that would be expected as the votes built toward a majority, the greater emotion evident was uneasy relief, the kind sensed in a home where a long, bitter quarrel has just spent itself without resolution.
NEWS
August 30, 1991
Predictably and hypocritically, opponents and supporters of Judge Clarence Thomas have seized on the American Bar Association's evaluation of his fitness to be a Supreme Court justice as vindication of their positions.The ABA's 15-member Standing Committee on the Judiciary gave Judge Thomas a "qualified" rating, with two members voting for "unqualified." No committee member rated him "highly qualified," which is the committee's only other category.This suggests serious qualms on the part of the lawyers.
NEWS
By Arch Parsons and Arch Parsons,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 12, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Some key members of the Congressional Black Caucus, an early opponent of the appointment of Judge Clarence Thomas to the Supreme Court, acknowledged yesterday that President Bush's nominee is likely to be confirmed by the Senate.As an estimated 20,000 politically minded black Americans began arriving here for the caucus's annual "legislative weekend," Representative John Conyers Jr., D-Mich., senior member of the caucus, said Judge Thomas would win Senate confirmation unless there is a "surprise" during the current hearing "or he shoots himself in the foot."
NEWS
By Charles R. Lawrence | October 16, 1991
ON FRIDAY, Clarence Thomas called the Judiciary Committee hearings a "high-tech lynching of an uppity black man." On Saturday, he called himself the victim of bigoted "racial attitudes about black men and their views of sex."I would like to believe Judge Thomas has finally learned he will never be free of racist stereotypes until the least of us is free.Yet another story is being told as white America watches this Washington soap opera. This is the story of the way Americans have turned a blind eye to the rape of black women by propagating the myth that black women had no right to refuse the sexual advances of any man.When the man on the street says, "I don't believe Hill's story," it is in part because he believes the old, oft-told story of "unchaste" black women.
NEWS
By SUN GRAPHICS | October 16, 1991
JUNE 27 - Thurgood Marshall, the only black ever to serve on the Supreme Court, announces his retirement.JULY 1 - President Bush nominates Clarence Thomas, 43, a black conservative federal appeals court judge, to replace Justice Marshall. The nominee is soon opposed by many civil rights and women's groups.SEPT. 3 - Anita F. Hill, a University of Oklahoma law professor and former assistant to Judge Thomas at the Education Department and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, is contacted by an aide to Sen. Howard Metzenbaum, D-Ohio, who opposes the nominee, to ask if she has any information about him.SEPT.
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