Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJudge Murphy
IN THE NEWS

Judge Murphy

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Staff Writer | June 26, 1993
Judge Joseph F. Murphy Jr. of the Baltimore County Circuit Court was appointed to Maryland's Court of Special Appeals yesterday to replace retired Judge Rosalyn Blake Bell.Judge Murphy, a former Baltimore City prosecutor and defense lawyer, law school professor and author of the Maryland Evidence Handbook, received the formal announcement from Gov. William Donald Schaefer's office late yesterday afternoon at his chambers in Towson, where he was awaiting a jury verdict in a civil case.The 1994 Maryland Senate must confirm the appointment.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2012
Judge Joseph F. Murphy Jr., who retired from Maryland's highest court last fall, has agreed to represent Sen. Ulysses Currie in an ethics inquiry expected to get under way in the General Assembly later this month. Currie, a Prince George's County Democrat who was acquitted of federal  corruption charges in November, could face disciplinary proceedings as a result of his admitted failure to fully disclose his ties with Shoppers Food Warehouse at a time when he was intervening before state agencies on the grocery chain's behalf.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 28, 1996
IN HIS LAST annual report to the General Assembly, Chief Judge Robert C. Murphy, who retires from the Maryland Court of Appeals next fall, told lawmakers that the state court system is so overloaded with litigation that its ability to remain a "viable institution of government" is at risk. Despite that assessment, DTC the chief judge did not ask for drastic changes. He didn't have to; a commission is now at work studying the state's judicial system and preparing recommendations for improving it.Maryland's 132 circuit judges and 98 district judges are coping with a rising number of cases.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2011
A judge on Maryland's highest court who has influenced the state's legal community over more than two decades said Tuesday that he will retire and join a Baltimore law firm. Joseph F. Murphy Jr., 67, said he plans to leave the Court of Appeals on Aug. 5. After that, he will join the law firm of Silverman, Thompson, Slutkin & White, where his daughter, Erin, is an appellate lawyer. "I've been on a long time. It's time to make way for other people, and I would like to have a couple of extra years practicing law with my daughter," Murphy said Tuesday.
NEWS
October 9, 1996
WITH THE RETIREMENT yesterday of Chief Judge Robert C. Murphy, Maryland can look back at a remarkable quarter-century for its court system. In that time, Maryland's courts have become more efficient and, especially at the District Court level, far less susceptible to political influence. Under the chief judge's leadership, the courts have also learned to cope with larger caseloads, more complicated legal issues and longer trials.When he assumed the office of chief judge in 1972, Mr. Murphy already had five years of experience as the first chief judge of the Court of Special Appeals.
NEWS
By Frederick Rasmussen and Frederick Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2000
Robert Charles Murphy, the retired chief judge of the Maryland Court of Appeals who presided over the transformation of the state judiciary while earning a reputation as a pragmatic jurist and tough administrator, died early yesterday of neuromuscular disease at his Timonium residence. He was 74. Before retiring in 1996 after 25 years as chief of Maryland's highest court, Judge Murphy oversaw the state's 252 judges, introduced such modern methods as computer tracking of cases, and created a system that temporarily recalled retired judges to the bench.
NEWS
By Roger Twigg and Roger Twigg,Staff Writer | May 14, 1992
A 59-year-old Armistead Gardens resident involved in a bitter court dispute over his father's estate has been charged with soliciting a man to murder a Baltimore County judge.The suspect felt that the Circuit Court judge made unfavorable rulings in the case, according to city police. The estate is valued at more than $1 million.John T. Klauenberg was arrested Tuesday at his home in the 1000 block of Rodman Way and charged with soliciting to murder and conspiracy to commit murder.He was being held without bail last night at the Eastern District lockup, police said.
NEWS
October 27, 1994
With public interest focused on judicial responses to women's issues, most of Maryland's 242 judges are expected in Towson today and tomorrow for a conference on family violence convened by Chief Judge Robert C. Murphy."
NEWS
By Roger Twigg and Roger Twigg,Staff Writer | May 14, 1992
A 59-year-old Armistead Gardens resident involved in a bitter battle over his father's estate -- valued in excess of $1 million -- has been charged with soliciting a man to murder the Baltimore County Circuit Court judge who the suspect felt made unfavorable rulings in the case, according to city police.John T. Klauenberg was arrested Tuesday at his home in the 1000 block of Rodman Way and charged with soliciting to murder and conspiracy to commit murder, police said.He was being held without bail last night at the Eastern District lockup, police said.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff | April 6, 1996
Responding to a lobbying effort organized on behalf of Orioles owner and multimillionaire attorney Peter G. Angelos, the Maryland General Assembly broke with years of tradition yesterday and approved four new Baltimore judgeships to help try thousands of his asbestos lawsuits.In passing the bill by a vote of 93 to 45, the House of Delegates seemed to agree with Mr. Angelos and Baltimore's chief Circuit Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan, who argued that the city judicial system is overwhelmed.By backing the measure, the legislature went against the will of ++ the state's highest-ranking judge, chief judge of the Court of Appeals, Robert C. Murphy.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | December 15, 2009
Judge Robert E. Cahill Sr., a retired Baltimore County Circuit Court judge who had been a highly regarded trial lawyer, died yesterday of gallbladder cancer at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The longtime Riderwood resident, who had lived in Mays Chapel for the past five years, was 77. Judge Cahill, the son of a bar owner and a homemaker, was born in St. Louis and raised on Lake Avenue. After graduating from Loyola High School in 1949, he earned a bachelor's degree in accounting in 1953 from the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Mass.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN REPORTER | December 5, 2007
Gov. Martin O'Malley nominated appellate Judge Joseph F. Murphy Jr. to Maryland's Court of Appeals yesterday, using his first opportunity to make over the state's highest court by choosing a jurist known for his depth of experience and moderate temperament. Murphy, chief judge of the state's second-highest court, would fill the vacancy created by the mandatory retirement of Judge Alan M. Wilner, who left the bench this year. Age limits on the court will give O'Malley two more opportunities to fill vacancies on the seven-member Court of Appeals in the coming months.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2005
Meyer M. Cardin, a former judge of the old Supreme Bench of Baltimore City and patriarch of a family of lawyers including Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, died of cancer yesterday at his Park Heights Avenue home. He would have celebrated his 98th birthday tomorrow. "They don't make judges like that anymore. He loved people and the law, and he had lots of wisdom, which he loved to share," Maryland Court of Appeals Chief Judge Robert M. Bell said yesterday. "He came from a different era, when the law was a lot less complex.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2003
The life and inspiration of Judge William H. Murphy Sr. - as father, mentor and civil rights leader to generations of Baltimoreans - was celebrated yesterday at Morgan State University, 10 days after his death from a cerebral hemorrhage at age 86. "Judge Murphy believed that the court system should be reflective of the society it's serving," said Maryland's Chief Judge Robert M. Bell, of the Court of Appeals. "Bill built many, many bridges. He instilled in all of us the need to build our bridges, not for ourselves but for those who come after us."
NEWS
June 1, 2003
HE WAS A mentor, a man who knew his own accomplishments would matter less if others didn't follow. He had been one of the 20th century's first black graduates of the University of Maryland Law School, and he wanted others to join him in the ranks of black litigators and judges. Judge William H. Murphy Sr., whose life will be celebrated today during a ceremony at Morgan State University, saw that even after the law school doors opened, justifiable fears remained. He took one young graduate to the Ideal Savings and Loan on Druid Hill Avenue to prove that you could be a black lawyer and prosper in Baltimore.
NEWS
November 1, 2000
IN THE LAST half-century, no one matched the contributions of Robert C. Murphy to Maryland's system of dispensing justice. Judge Murphy, who died Monday at 74, was the father of Maryland's modern judiciary. Key to his success was a love of people. He always returned phone calls, even to irate citizens. The Baltimore native proved popular with politicians, in part because he relished the give-and-take of the legislative process and buttonholing lawmakers. But his real strength came from his direct, honest approach and his likability.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service T | December 31, 1991
In one of several important desegregation lawsuits in higher education, a federal judge ruled yesterday that Alabama and its state universities must change financing and admission policies and hire more black faculty members and administrators.The district judge, Harold Murphy of Rome, Ga., ruled that vestiges of racial discrimination remained in Alabama's higher education system. He ordered Alabama and its universities to devise plans to remedy those problems, and said he would retain jurisdiction over the case for the next 10 years to insure that the ruling was carried out.Judge Murphy's decision could become moot, however, because the U.S. Supreme Court is considering a similar case in Mississippi, the first time the court will address the question of desegregation in higher education.
NEWS
By Frederick Rasmussen and Frederick Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2000
Robert Charles Murphy, the retired chief judge of the Maryland Court of Appeals who presided over the transformation of the state judiciary while earning a reputation as a pragmatic jurist and tough administrator, died early yesterday of neuromuscular disease at his Timonium residence. He was 74. Before retiring in 1996 after 25 years as chief of Maryland's highest court, Judge Murphy oversaw the state's 252 judges, introduced such modern methods as computer tracking of cases, and created a system that temporarily recalled retired judges to the bench.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.