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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2012
Katie Couric's visit last week to Baltimore's WMAR proved at least one thing: She is serious about making her new daytime talk show, “Katie,” a winner. She did not do such intense promotion in the summer of 2006 even when she was about to debut as anchor of the “CBS Evening News," one of the most prestigious -- or at least historic -- jobs in television. And that kind of commitment from her means the competition in one of the most hotly contested time periods in local TV is going to be even fiercer this fall when her syndicated show debuts.
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NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | January 14, 2014
The story of a teenage mother and her foul-mouthed two-year-old son made big national news this past week. The video of the cursing toddler quickly went viral - a fitting term, that - and soon television producers had the kind of story they crave. In today's media age, whether in the regular news or so-called reality television, the best stories are those for which viewers and listeners need almost zero information or background as a point of entry - subjects as mundane as traffic or as divisive as race and almost any story involving family, interpersonal relationships and parenting.
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FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 14, 1999
The verdict is in: Stern-faced, no-nonsense judges are the new stars of daytime TV. And that means more of them will soon be coming to a small screen near you.But the question is: What's the appeal? What is it about the cranky Judge Judy that suddenly makes her more popular than the empathetic Oprah? And why is Judge Mills Lane, who looks and sounds like an angry Elmer Fudd, now challenging the likes of "Jerry Springer"?"I think it's a combination of factors," said Emerson Coleman, vice president of programming for the Hearst-Argyle station group.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2012
Katie Couric's visit last week to Baltimore's WMAR proved at least one thing: She is serious about making her new daytime talk show, “Katie,” a winner. She did not do such intense promotion in the summer of 2006 even when she was about to debut as anchor of the “CBS Evening News," one of the most prestigious -- or at least historic -- jobs in television. And that kind of commitment from her means the competition in one of the most hotly contested time periods in local TV is going to be even fiercer this fall when her syndicated show debuts.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 28, 1999
WJZ (Channel 13) continued its dominance in local news during the May "sweeps" ratings period that ended yesterday. But the hottest single newscast in town has to be the 6: 30 p.m. report on WNUV (Channel 54) that more than doubled its audience in the last year, thanks in part to its lead-in of the red-hot "Judge Judy" courtroom show.Meanwhile, one of the programs showing the biggest loss of audience from last year is "Jerry Springer," which dropped 30 percent in viewership. "Oprah," too, slipped in the ratings losing 20 percent of its audience.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 25, 1999
Bikers are wimps. At least, that's the gist of a new national survey of motorcycle riders that says male bikers are five times as likely to cry during movies -- especially "The Lion King" -- as men who don't ride. They also enjoy poetry more, and some wish they could be Oprah Winfrey. "Men motorcyclists are not who you may think," said a spokesman for Progressive Insurance, which sponsored the survey. Their average age is about 40, and they tend to be in mid- to upper-income levels.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun Columnist | August 8, 2007
Each week, my inbox fills up quickly with surveys that explore some aspect of the workplace, some serious, some light-hearted. Here's a sampling of recent surveys that can be used for watercooler fodder or a good laugh: A survey commissioned by Diet Pepsi Max, a highly caffeinated new soda, found that 50 percent of 1,102 respondents have caught someone asleep on the job, while 28 percent have fallen asleep at work themselves. Apparently, auto mechanics have the highest rate of on-the-job snoozing at 65 percent, followed by government workers at 51 percent.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | January 14, 2014
The story of a teenage mother and her foul-mouthed two-year-old son made big national news this past week. The video of the cursing toddler quickly went viral - a fitting term, that - and soon television producers had the kind of story they crave. In today's media age, whether in the regular news or so-called reality television, the best stories are those for which viewers and listeners need almost zero information or background as a point of entry - subjects as mundane as traffic or as divisive as race and almost any story involving family, interpersonal relationships and parenting.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1999
In a gamble calculated to draw viewers to its low-rated news programs, WMAR, Channel 2, is dropping a half-hour of news from its evening schedule and moving the megapopular "Jeopardy!" to 5: 30 p.m.The move, scheduled to take effect Sept. 6, means elimination of the station's 5: 30 p.m.-6 p.m. newscast. And it could also mean decreased viewership for "Jeopardy!" which, teamed with "Wheel of Fortune" at 7: 30, had proven one of the beleaguered station's few ratings successes.But station management said they were willing to take the gamble to put a more popular program in front of the station's 6 p.m. newscast, with veteran anchors Stan Stovall and Mary Beth Marsden.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2011
When Oprah Winfrey ends her syndicated talk show Wednesday, millions of fans will not be the only ones facing a void. TV station executives who have lived with what's come to be known as the "Oprah Factor" are buying, selling, hoping and praying to get a piece of the audience of one of the most lucrative franchises in television. Tens of millions of dollars are at stake. "With Oprah leaving, it's the Wild West in lots of cities like Baltimore," says Bob Papper, Hofstra University professor of media studies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2011
When Oprah Winfrey ends her syndicated talk show Wednesday, millions of fans will not be the only ones facing a void. TV station executives who have lived with what's come to be known as the "Oprah Factor" are buying, selling, hoping and praying to get a piece of the audience of one of the most lucrative franchises in television. Tens of millions of dollars are at stake. "With Oprah leaving, it's the Wild West in lots of cities like Baltimore," says Bob Papper, Hofstra University professor of media studies.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun Columnist | August 8, 2007
Each week, my inbox fills up quickly with surveys that explore some aspect of the workplace, some serious, some light-hearted. Here's a sampling of recent surveys that can be used for watercooler fodder or a good laugh: A survey commissioned by Diet Pepsi Max, a highly caffeinated new soda, found that 50 percent of 1,102 respondents have caught someone asleep on the job, while 28 percent have fallen asleep at work themselves. Apparently, auto mechanics have the highest rate of on-the-job snoozing at 65 percent, followed by government workers at 51 percent.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1999
In a gamble calculated to draw viewers to its low-rated news programs, WMAR, Channel 2, is dropping a half-hour of news from its evening schedule and moving the megapopular "Jeopardy!" to 5: 30 p.m.The move, scheduled to take effect Sept. 6, means elimination of the station's 5: 30 p.m.-6 p.m. newscast. And it could also mean decreased viewership for "Jeopardy!" which, teamed with "Wheel of Fortune" at 7: 30, had proven one of the beleaguered station's few ratings successes.But station management said they were willing to take the gamble to put a more popular program in front of the station's 6 p.m. newscast, with veteran anchors Stan Stovall and Mary Beth Marsden.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 28, 1999
WJZ (Channel 13) continued its dominance in local news during the May "sweeps" ratings period that ended yesterday. But the hottest single newscast in town has to be the 6: 30 p.m. report on WNUV (Channel 54) that more than doubled its audience in the last year, thanks in part to its lead-in of the red-hot "Judge Judy" courtroom show.Meanwhile, one of the programs showing the biggest loss of audience from last year is "Jerry Springer," which dropped 30 percent in viewership. "Oprah," too, slipped in the ratings losing 20 percent of its audience.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 25, 1999
Bikers are wimps. At least, that's the gist of a new national survey of motorcycle riders that says male bikers are five times as likely to cry during movies -- especially "The Lion King" -- as men who don't ride. They also enjoy poetry more, and some wish they could be Oprah Winfrey. "Men motorcyclists are not who you may think," said a spokesman for Progressive Insurance, which sponsored the survey. Their average age is about 40, and they tend to be in mid- to upper-income levels.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 14, 1999
The verdict is in: Stern-faced, no-nonsense judges are the new stars of daytime TV. And that means more of them will soon be coming to a small screen near you.But the question is: What's the appeal? What is it about the cranky Judge Judy that suddenly makes her more popular than the empathetic Oprah? And why is Judge Mills Lane, who looks and sounds like an angry Elmer Fudd, now challenging the likes of "Jerry Springer"?"I think it's a combination of factors," said Emerson Coleman, vice president of programming for the Hearst-Argyle station group.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,Sun reporter | April 21, 2007
Only a charity event could boast such a bizarre assemblage: British and Northeast Baltimore royalty sitting for a proper tea party with a famous corporate clown in the west side of downtown. Yet there they were yesterday, two of the world's most famous redheads -- Sarah Ferguson, Duchess of York, and Ronald McDonald -- having a spot of tea with Maryland first lady Katie Curran O'Malley. The occasion: to announce a McDonald's charity program that will place a new item -- a $1 donation -- on the Maryland menus of the chain's 500 restaurants in the Baltimore and Washington region.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2012
The kid's name was Chase, and the driver knew he'd be trouble from the second he set foot on the school bus. "He was a sixth-grader, a little rebel," said Eddie Hinton, aka "Mr. Eddie" to the children. "I decided to try and change that. " One morning, as Chase climbed aboard, Hinton declared, "I'm going to make you my friend. " Chase shrugged and moved on. "When he sat down, the kid next to him whispered, 'You know, Mr. Eddie played in the Super Bowl,' " Hinton said. Chase glanced first at the aging driver, then at the 1970 championship ring on his hand.
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