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By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 13, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A federal appeals court, brushing asid complaints of racial bias, upheld yesterday the cocaine conviction of former Washington Mayor Marion S. Barry Jr. but said that the six-month jail term he received must be reconsidered because of errors the judge made in sentencing him.Mr. Barry was convicted last August of a single misdemeanor count of cocaine possession after a 10-week trial that inflamed local racial tensions and attracted national attention. The jury, reflecting the divisions in the community, acquitted him of a second possession charge but deadlocked on 12 other drug-related counts of possession, conspiracy and perjury, resulting in a mistrial on those charges.
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NEWS
July 2, 2001
MICROSOFT is a monopoly. A predatory monopoly. But what is an appropriate remedy to impose? Thursday's unanimous ruling from the U. S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia produced expected results in two areas. First, the appellate judges agreed Microsoft had broken antitrust laws. Its aggressive business practices crushed or drove out competitors. That helped make Microsoft the all-powerful standard-setter for computer software. It deterred innovations that threatened its dominance.
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NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service | March 20, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Union officials in Maryland, while relieved that a federal judge threw out a law that bars federal employees from accepting honoraria for speeches and articles, say the legal battle isn't over yet.The law was "half-baked to begin with -- trying to keep federal workers from getting money for speaking and writing they do outside the job," said John Gage, president of Local 1923 of the American Federation of Government Employees, speaking yesterday...
NEWS
June 9, 2000
THE SKY WILL not fall if Microsoft Corp., the most successful company of the Computer Age, is forced to split in two, as U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson ordered on Wednesday. Indeed, there's a long way to go before we even reach that point. It may be years before a final, definitive verdict is implemented. By that time, the rapid pace of technological innovation could turn this anti-trust battle into a dispute over a largely obsolete computer operating system. All or part of Judge Jackson's decision could be overturned on appeal at one of two levels.
NEWS
By Arch Parsons and Arch Parsons,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 18, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Prosecutors announced in U.S. District Court yesterday that they have decided not to retry Mayor Marion S. Barry Jr. on any of the 12 counts of drug possession and perjury that deadlocked the jury at his trial.Assistant U.S. Attorney Judith Retchin told Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson, "The government has made a determination not to seek retrial on the pending counts."At the announcement, the mayor -- who had said before his trial that "all it takes" to hang a jury was "one juror saying 'I'm not going to vote against Marion Barry'" -- grinned.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | January 25, 1994
WASHINGTON -- A federal judge ruled yesterday that Sen. Bob Packwood has no constitutional right to keep his personal diaries secret from Senate ethics investigators, and ordered them turned over promptly.U.S. District Judge Thomas P. Jackson conceded that diaries are "extremely personal and private in nature," but said that the Senate Select Committee on Ethics had promised to respect the "sensitivities" of the Oregon Republican during its probe of alleged misconduct.He rejected the senator's claim that the committee would "rummage" through the videotapes and typed transcripts without regard for Mr. Packwood's privacy.
NEWS
November 1, 1990
Proper justice was not meted out in the trial, conviction and sentencing of Washington Mayor Marion Barry, now running for an at-large seat on the D.C. City Council.We said in August that the jury had before it enough evidence to convict Mr. Barry on more than a single misdemeanor count of "simple possession" of cocaine. That was injustice No. 1. Injustice No. 2 was the sentence Mr. Barry received last week. He should not have been given six months in prison. That is unduly harsh for this crime.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | March 20, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Federal government workers gained a new constitutional right yesterday -- to accept pay for making speeches and writing articles on their own time. But they will not be able to start collecting right away.A federal judge struck down a clause in a 1989 law that banned all fees for much of the outside speaking and writing that federal employees could do. Another part of the law, forbidding members of Congress to accept honorariums, was left intact.U.S. District Judge Thomas P. Jackson ruled that, even though the law left federal workers free to speak and write for nothing, the Constitution protects the right to receive money as an incentive to expression.
NEWS
By Sean Elder | April 6, 2000
THE WAR DRUMS started beating last week, after it was announced that talks between Microsoft and the Department of Justice had broken down. Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson would render his verdict Monday, it was speculated, and it wasn't going to be pretty. The press could hardly wait. The Microsoft decision is, of course, a bona fide big deal; stocks trembled and fell in anticipation of Judge Jackson's decision and legitimate historical questions about the relevance of anti-trust legislation in the age of the Internet were on the lips of news readers who thought Sherman was Peabody's assistant.
NEWS
June 9, 2000
THE SKY WILL not fall if Microsoft Corp., the most successful company of the Computer Age, is forced to split in two, as U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson ordered on Wednesday. Indeed, there's a long way to go before we even reach that point. It may be years before a final, definitive verdict is implemented. By that time, the rapid pace of technological innovation could turn this anti-trust battle into a dispute over a largely obsolete computer operating system. All or part of Judge Jackson's decision could be overturned on appeal at one of two levels.
NEWS
By Sean Elder | April 6, 2000
THE WAR DRUMS started beating last week, after it was announced that talks between Microsoft and the Department of Justice had broken down. Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson would render his verdict Monday, it was speculated, and it wasn't going to be pretty. The press could hardly wait. The Microsoft decision is, of course, a bona fide big deal; stocks trembled and fell in anticipation of Judge Jackson's decision and legitimate historical questions about the relevance of anti-trust legislation in the age of the Internet were on the lips of news readers who thought Sherman was Peabody's assistant.
NEWS
November 9, 1999
SHED no tears for Microsoft billionaire Bill Gates. Though a federal district judge said his company had acted like a monopolist and had "harmed consumers in ways that are immediate and easily discernible," Mr. Gates is still the biggest chip in the computer software market.The court found last week that Microsoft had squashed competitors who threatened its monopoly or used tough business tactics to keep other companies in line. This sets the stage for a formal court ruling -- probably next spring -- that the world's most valuable company violated antitrust law.After Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson's verdict, it could be years before all the appeals are resolved.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | January 25, 1994
WASHINGTON -- A federal judge ruled yesterday that Sen. Bob Packwood has no constitutional right to keep his personal diaries secret from Senate ethics investigators, and ordered them turned over promptly.U.S. District Judge Thomas P. Jackson conceded that diaries are "extremely personal and private in nature," but said that the Senate Select Committee on Ethics had promised to respect the "sensitivities" of the Oregon Republican during its probe of alleged misconduct.He rejected the senator's claim that the committee would "rummage" through the videotapes and typed transcripts without regard for Mr. Packwood's privacy.
NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service | March 20, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Union officials in Maryland, while relieved that a federal judge threw out a law that bars federal employees from accepting honoraria for speeches and articles, say the legal battle isn't over yet.The law was "half-baked to begin with -- trying to keep federal workers from getting money for speaking and writing they do outside the job," said John Gage, president of Local 1923 of the American Federation of Government Employees, speaking yesterday...
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | March 20, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Federal government workers gained a new constitutional right yesterday -- to accept pay for making speeches and writing articles on their own time. But they will not be able to start collecting right away.A federal judge struck down a clause in a 1989 law that banned all fees for much of the outside speaking and writing that federal employees could do. Another part of the law, forbidding members of Congress to accept honorariums, was left intact.U.S. District Judge Thomas P. Jackson ruled that, even though the law left federal workers free to speak and write for nothing, the Constitution protects the right to receive money as an incentive to expression.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 13, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A federal appeals court, brushing asid complaints of racial bias, upheld yesterday the cocaine conviction of former Washington Mayor Marion S. Barry Jr. but said that the six-month jail term he received must be reconsidered because of errors the judge made in sentencing him.Mr. Barry was convicted last August of a single misdemeanor count of cocaine possession after a 10-week trial that inflamed local racial tensions and attracted national attention. The jury, reflecting the divisions in the community, acquitted him of a second possession charge but deadlocked on 12 other drug-related counts of possession, conspiracy and perjury, resulting in a mistrial on those charges.
NEWS
July 2, 2001
MICROSOFT is a monopoly. A predatory monopoly. But what is an appropriate remedy to impose? Thursday's unanimous ruling from the U. S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia produced expected results in two areas. First, the appellate judges agreed Microsoft had broken antitrust laws. Its aggressive business practices crushed or drove out competitors. That helped make Microsoft the all-powerful standard-setter for computer software. It deterred innovations that threatened its dominance.
NEWS
By Wiley A. Hall 3rd | November 6, 1990
U.S. District Court Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson got only half of it right when he socked it to D.C. Mayor Marion Barry last month.Jackson gave Barry six months in prison and a $5,000 fine -- a fairly hefty penalty for a first conviction on a misdemeanor drug-possession charge. To add insult to injury, Barry also must reimburse the government an estimated $9,653 for his prison upkeep.The judge explained that Barry deserved such a stiff sentence because he had betrayed his position as a role model to the city's youth.
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