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NEWS
August 10, 1993
Ruth Bader Ginsburg begins her career as a Supreme Court justice today. She was confirmed by the Senate by a vote of 96-3 only three working days after the Senate Judiciary Committee recommended her confirmation unanimously. Quite a contrast from the last go-round. In 1991, the committee recommended against confirmation of Judge Clarence Thomas, and the full Senate confirmed by only a 52-48 vote.Judge Thomas was criticized for a lot of things in his hearings, including non-responsiveness to questions about his legal philosophy.
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NEWS
August 10, 1993
Ruth Bader Ginsburg begins her career as a Supreme Court justice today. She was confirmed by the Senate by a vote of 96-3 only three working days after the Senate Judiciary Committee recommended her confirmation unanimously. Quite a contrast from the last go-round. In 1991, the committee recommended against confirmation of Judge Clarence Thomas, and the full Senate confirmed by only a 52-48 vote.Judge Thomas was criticized for a lot of things in his hearings, including non-responsiveness to questions about his legal philosophy.
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NEWS
June 16, 1993
The first critics of Supreme Court nominee Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg were pro-choice leaders. That is doubly surprising. It is a surprise to the critics themselves because candidate Bill Clinton promised them he would apply a "litmus test" to this nomination. The test was that the nominee support Roe vs. Wade, which Judge Ginsburg has criticized. But today's criticism is itself a surprise. We say that because closely read, Judge Ginsburg's views on Roe are not really inconsistent with the ideals of the pro-choice movement.
NEWS
By LYLE DENNISTON | August 8, 1993
Washington. -- Ruth Bader Ginsburg, already something of a national heroine, becomes an even more lasting eminence on Tuesday as she joins the Supreme Court -- only the second woman in history to take a place among 105 men who have been justices.Strangely, though, almost no one can say with any confidence what kind of justice the 60-year-old Ms. Ginsburg will be. The reason is simple: Some 20 years of public prominence provide no sure answer, and neither do eight weeks of close scrutiny this summer.
NEWS
By TRB | June 25, 1993
Washington. -- Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg, we're told, is a ''moderate.'' Indeed, Judge Ginsburg tells us herself.In her now-famous lecture at New York University, she practically foams at the mouth with moderation. An ''effective judge,'' she says, ''will speak in a moderate and restrained voice.'' Rather than issuing ''extravagant and divisive'' decisions such as Roe v. Wade, the courts should move ''modestly,'' one case at a time.Can there be anything wrong with this? If, like me, you think the Supreme Court has abused its anti-majoritarian mandate -- and that Roe is Exhibit A -- then Judge Ginsburg's moderation seems almost exciting.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 16, 1993
Don't count Mickey out. He has the best name recognitio from the fat cats. Judge Ginsburg is the first New Yorker on the court in a long time, but not a militant New Yorker. The U.N. is shooting up civilians in Mogadishu, which is better than the U.S. doing it.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 21, 1993
Cheer up. The city property tax rate may plummet to $5.85.Bill ought to go on prime time more often, at least until the new shows debut in October.Be patriotic. Hock the store for a luxury suite in a stadium that does not exist for a team that may never materialize.Judge Ginsburg is revising her past speeches to have conservative and liberal versions of each available. Once on the Supreme Court, you can't do that.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau Jeff Leeds of the Washington Bureau contributed to this article | June 19, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Senate Judiciary Committee is beginning to be pressured to make a searching inquiry into Supreme Court nominee Ruth Bader Ginsburg's views on abortion when it holds hearings a month from now.Abortion has been a significant issue in all hearings on court nominees for a dozen years, but Judge Ginsburg's public comments on the issue -- and her recent revisions of her most controversial statement --are intensifying the interest, according to...
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau | June 15, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton nominated Ruth Bader Ginsburg to the Supreme Court yesterday, selecting a heroine of the women's movement who would be the first Jewish justice on the high court in 24 years.Ending his troubled, three-month search to replace retiring Justice Byron R. White, Mr. Clinton called Judge Ginsburg, the first high court appointment by a Democratic president in almost 26 years, "a healer" and a "centrist" who will prove to be "an able force for consensus-building on the Supreme Court."
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | July 7, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Supreme Court nominee Ruth Bader Ginsburg, in her first effort to win favor with the Senate, has sketched out a cautious approach to using judicial powers, saying courts should remain skeptical about their ability to remedy society's wrongs."
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | July 30, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Senate Judiciary Committee voted unanimously and with obvious enthusiasm yesterday to approve the Supreme Court nomination of Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg, 60, setting the stage for a final Senate vote next week.With repeated expressions of relief that the committee did not have a fight before acting on a Supreme Court nominee, the panel spent most of its 93-minute public meeting praising President Clinton's first nominee. As is customary, the nominee was not in the meeting room.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | July 26, 1993
IT SEEMS LIKE only yesterday that Clarence Thomas told the Senate Judiciary he had never discussed Roe vs. Wade even in private, and Democratic senators all but called him a liar.But it wasn't last week, it was two years ago. Yesterday (figuratively speaking; actually it was last Thursday) Ruth Bader Ginsburg was telling the committee that she had never, ever discussed the death penalty, and the same Democrats, Joseph Biden, Edward Kennedy, Howard Metzenbaum, uttered not a word of skepticism.
NEWS
July 24, 1993
Supreme Court nominee Ruth Bader Ginsburg was as vague as possible in answering pointed questions in her confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Some members of the committee chided her. But her refusal to hint how she might vote in particular cases was as traditional as some of the senators' attempts at entrapment.Judge Ginsburg explained what the senators already knew: Without reading the briefs, listening to the oral arguments, researching precedents, conferring with colleagues, a justice cannot -- or at least should not -- have an opinion on a case.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | July 22, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Supreme Court nominee Ruth Bader Ginsburg strongly urged Congress yesterday to add an Equal Rights Amendment to the Constitution but gave no clear sign that she would try to get the court to create new women's rights if there is no ERA.Spending much of her time on her second day before the Senate Judiciary Committee answering questions about discrimination against women, the judge and former pioneering women's rights lawyer repeatedly recited...
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | July 21, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg, beginning what one senator called a "triumphal march" to the Supreme Court, sought to convince the Senate Judiciary Committee yesterday that she would be a cautious justice, skeptical about bold ventures in the law.The 60-year-old jurist said on the first day of nationally televised hearings that she considers the courts to be "third in line" in the United States' government structure, behind the executive and legislative...
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | July 7, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Supreme Court nominee Ruth Bader Ginsburg, in her first effort to win favor with the Senate, has sketched out a cautious approach to using judicial powers, saying courts should remain skeptical about their ability to remedy society's wrongs."
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | July 26, 1993
IT SEEMS LIKE only yesterday that Clarence Thomas told the Senate Judiciary he had never discussed Roe vs. Wade even in private, and Democratic senators all but called him a liar.But it wasn't last week, it was two years ago. Yesterday (figuratively speaking; actually it was last Thursday) Ruth Bader Ginsburg was telling the committee that she had never, ever discussed the death penalty, and the same Democrats, Joseph Biden, Edward Kennedy, Howard Metzenbaum, uttered not a word of skepticism.
NEWS
By Philip C. Metzger | July 2, 1993
JUDGE Ruth Bader Ginsburg has won endorsement from enough key senators to forecast an easy confirmation to the Supreme Court, barring unforeseen developments.That provides a calm setting for assessing one doctrinal speed bump in the process: her critique of the scope and footing of the 1973 Roe vs. Wade decision to legalize abortion.In a 1984 speech and later articles, Judge Ginsburg suggested that Justice Harry A. Blackmun's majority opinion was unnecessarily "muscular." While she applauded Roe's voiding of the Texas law at issue, she wondered if Roe had outstripped its political support by striking down virtually every state abortion statute.
NEWS
By Philip C. Metzger | July 2, 1993
JUDGE Ruth Bader Ginsburg has won endorsement from enough key senators to forecast an easy confirmation to the Supreme Court, barring unforeseen developments.That provides a calm setting for assessing one doctrinal speed bump in the process: her critique of the scope and footing of the 1973 Roe vs. Wade decision to legalize abortion.In a 1984 speech and later articles, Judge Ginsburg suggested that Justice Harry A. Blackmun's majority opinion was unnecessarily "muscular." While she applauded Roe's voiding of the Texas law at issue, she wondered if Roe had outstripped its political support by striking down virtually every state abortion statute.
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