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By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau of The Sun | September 29, 1994
London--In the Victorian conservatory of The Old House at Shepperton Studios, Paul Olliver does a little pirouette and says: "Mr. Stallone? He's wonderful."The cherubic, well-coiffed Mr. Olliver, studio manager at Shepperton, has good reason to dance for joy. Mr. Sylvester Stallone is filming his $60 million seriocomic super-hero epic "Judge Dredd" at Shepperton.About half the budget is being spent in Britain and lots of it is coming to Shepperton Studios. Half a dozen of Shepperton's 17 enormous sound stages and even a parking lot are taken up with sets for "Judge Dredd's" post-post-post-modern Mega-City One opus.
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By Louis B. Parks and Louis B. Parks,Houston Chronicle | July 30, 1995
Special effects have never been so special. This summer's movies carry visual effects -- known as FX in Hollywood -- to places not possible even last year.Those places are just as likely to be Camelot or a boy's toy cupboard as outer space. While everyone knows they're watching FX in "Apollo 13," "Judge Dredd" and "Casper," they are less likely to expect them in "First Knight" and "Braveheart."It may not surprise audiences to learn that the rockets in "Apollo 13" are models that were digitally inserted in the picture.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | June 30, 1995
This is hard for me, folks. I don't know if I can do it.Sylvester Stallone has finally made a good mov --No. I can't do it. My fingers refuse to obey my mind. I am ordering them to type: "Sylvester Stallone has finally made a good movie" and they will not do it.Let's try: Sylvester Stallone's new film, "Judge Dredd," isn't that bad.See how easy that was?And it gets better: He's the worst thing in it.Derived from a legendary British comic book, the movie offers Stallone, blimpy with muscle (he appears to have muscles in his lips!
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By David Kronke and David Kronke,Special to The Sun | July 12, 1995
"You want to be an actress, and you wind up in a toy store." That's Laura Linney, reflecting on the diminishing line dividing high art and pop commerce. Ms. Linney, who starred in the critically acclaimed miniseries "Tales of the City," can now be seen in theaters across the country, fearlessly gunning down monkeys as Karen Ross in the $50-million "Congo," as well as in our nation's toy stores, neatly encased in blister wrap.This summer, action figures and assorted merchandise from "Batman Forever," "Congo," "Judge Dredd" and "Waterworld" will be flooding toy stores, while "Apollo 13" will feature just about everything but action figures.
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By Louis B. Parks and Louis B. Parks,Houston Chronicle | July 30, 1995
Special effects have never been so special. This summer's movies carry visual effects -- known as FX in Hollywood -- to places not possible even last year.Those places are just as likely to be Camelot or a boy's toy cupboard as outer space. While everyone knows they're watching FX in "Apollo 13," "Judge Dredd" and "Casper," they are less likely to expect them in "First Knight" and "Braveheart."It may not surprise audiences to learn that the rockets in "Apollo 13" are models that were digitally inserted in the picture.
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By Bob Strauss and Bob Strauss,Los Angeles Daily News | May 14, 1995
The stakes are higher than ever in this year's summer movie game. After making a record $2.2 billion last summer, Hollywood is spending even more money than usual in the hopes of winning big.Six of this summer's major pictures -- paced by the most expensive movie ever, the reportedly $175 million "Waterworld" -- are estimated to have cost more than $70 million apiece. And that's not counting the huge advertising budgets of $20 million to $25 million that films such as "Batman Forever," "Judge Dredd," "Die Hard With a Vengeance," "First Knight" and "Braveheart" require just to find the audiences they need to break even.
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By David Kronke and David Kronke,Special to The Sun | July 12, 1995
"You want to be an actress, and you wind up in a toy store." That's Laura Linney, reflecting on the diminishing line dividing high art and pop commerce. Ms. Linney, who starred in the critically acclaimed miniseries "Tales of the City," can now be seen in theaters across the country, fearlessly gunning down monkeys as Karen Ross in the $50-million "Congo," as well as in our nation's toy stores, neatly encased in blister wrap.This summer, action figures and assorted merchandise from "Batman Forever," "Congo," "Judge Dredd" and "Waterworld" will be flooding toy stores, while "Apollo 13" will feature just about everything but action figures.
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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 31, 1995
When word went out that the next cartoon character destined for the big screen was Tank Girl, comics fans across the country turned excitedly and said, "Who?"To say that Tank Girl lacks the name-recognition of Superman, Batman or the Punisher would be understating it considerably. Even compared with fellow English comics sensation Judge Dredd, Tank Girl has never had much of a profile or following on this side of the Atlantic. So why has Hollywood plowed so much money and hype into promoting her?
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1996
Give up. You can't win. You can resist all you want, but you can't outlast it. Go ahead. Watch the Olympics tonight."High Incident" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Two California cops stop a car that's being driven by an obnoxious New York cop. Nothing stereotypical here. ABC."Driving Miss Daisy" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WUSA, Channel 9) -- A pleasant film that inexplicably won the Best Picture Oscar for 1989, this look at the weathering away of segregation in the South stars Jessica Tandy as the headstrong Daisy Werthan and Morgan Freeman as Hoke Colburn, her equally stubborn, if not as abrasive, chauffeur.
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By Los Angeles Times | December 21, 1994
In what is believed to be the biggest deal ever made with an actor, Savoy Pictures has agreed to pay Sylvester Stallone $20 million, or potentially an unprecedented percentage of total revenues, to star in a yet-to-be-determined movie in 1996.According to informed sources, the deal guarantees Mr. Stallone $20 million, or 20 percent of total receipts collected by Savoy from all media worldwide if those revenues exceed $100 million.Industry insiders say the agreement is staggering and could cause a domino effect in Hollywood, where today's biggest stars command $12 million-$15 million a picture against 15 percent of the distributor's receipts.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | June 30, 1995
This is hard for me, folks. I don't know if I can do it.Sylvester Stallone has finally made a good mov --No. I can't do it. My fingers refuse to obey my mind. I am ordering them to type: "Sylvester Stallone has finally made a good movie" and they will not do it.Let's try: Sylvester Stallone's new film, "Judge Dredd," isn't that bad.See how easy that was?And it gets better: He's the worst thing in it.Derived from a legendary British comic book, the movie offers Stallone, blimpy with muscle (he appears to have muscles in his lips!
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By Bob Strauss and Bob Strauss,Los Angeles Daily News | May 14, 1995
The stakes are higher than ever in this year's summer movie game. After making a record $2.2 billion last summer, Hollywood is spending even more money than usual in the hopes of winning big.Six of this summer's major pictures -- paced by the most expensive movie ever, the reportedly $175 million "Waterworld" -- are estimated to have cost more than $70 million apiece. And that's not counting the huge advertising budgets of $20 million to $25 million that films such as "Batman Forever," "Judge Dredd," "Die Hard With a Vengeance," "First Knight" and "Braveheart" require just to find the audiences they need to break even.
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By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau of The Sun | September 29, 1994
London--In the Victorian conservatory of The Old House at Shepperton Studios, Paul Olliver does a little pirouette and says: "Mr. Stallone? He's wonderful."The cherubic, well-coiffed Mr. Olliver, studio manager at Shepperton, has good reason to dance for joy. Mr. Sylvester Stallone is filming his $60 million seriocomic super-hero epic "Judge Dredd" at Shepperton.About half the budget is being spent in Britain and lots of it is coming to Shepperton Studios. Half a dozen of Shepperton's 17 enormous sound stages and even a parking lot are taken up with sets for "Judge Dredd's" post-post-post-modern Mega-City One opus.
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By Bernard Weinraub and Bernard Weinraub,New York Times News Service | July 25, 1995
In the midst of a summer of mostly desultory films, along came "Clueless." The wickedly funny farce about rich teen-age girls in Beverly Hills emerged last weekend as a sleeper hit of the summer."
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By Lea Saslav and Lea Saslav,New York Times News Service | February 27, 1995
Come March 27, about 1 billion viewers are expected to turn on their television sets to the live 67th Annual Academy Awards. But for the first time in Academy Award history, as the Oscar winners make their way backstage to greet journalists from around the world, viewers with access to the World Wide Web or ABC Online will be able to be right there in the pressroom.How? Earlier this month, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences established its own site, or address, on the Web, where computer users can get detailed information about this year's Oscars race.
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