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Judge Breyer

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NEWS
July 15, 1994
As expected, most members of the Senate Judiciary Committee have indicated their strong endorsement of Judge Stephen Breyer to become a Supreme Court justice. And properly so. He is an extremely capable jurist.But there was a discordant note in his confirmation hearings -- his investment in Lloyd's of London. That firm, as Sen. Howell Heflin said to Judge Breyer, "is known nationwide as insuring anything. So the idea of having an investment in Lloyd's of London raises some sort of issue pertaining as to whether or not, after going on the bench, you ought to have divested yourself of any interest in Lloyd's."
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NEWS
July 27, 1994
Though supportive of Judge Stephen Breyer for a seat on the Supreme Court, and confident he would sail smoothly to confirmation, we said in this space on the eve of his Senate Judiciary Committee hearings last month that committee members should be "thorough and unsentimental" in questioning him. There were a few hard questions, but not many, considering the fact that inspection of his investments in Lloyd's of London insurance ventures showed he had exposed...
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NEWS
July 27, 1994
Though supportive of Judge Stephen Breyer for a seat on the Supreme Court, and confident he would sail smoothly to confirmation, we said in this space on the eve of his Senate Judiciary Committee hearings last month that committee members should be "thorough and unsentimental" in questioning him. There were a few hard questions, but not many, considering the fact that inspection of his investments in Lloyd's of London insurance ventures showed he had exposed...
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 20, 1994
WASHINGTON -- With enthusiasm from Democrats and Republicans, a few reservations and no hesitation, the Senate Judiciary Committee voted unanimously yesterday to approve federal appeals Judge Stephen G. Breyer to be a Supreme Court justice.The 18-0 vote sent President Clinton's nominee toward easy approval by the full Senate late this week or early next, as the successor to retiring Justice Harry A. Blackmun.Praised by senators mainly for his moderation and his judicial pragmatism, the 55-year-old nominee appeared to have made real the White House expectation that he would get by without even a hint of a fight in an often-contentious committee.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Lyle Denniston and Carl M. Cannon and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 14, 1994
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton, almost certainly avoiding a confirmation battle, chose for the Supreme Court yesterday federal appeals Judge Stephen G. Breyer, a soft-spoken moderate with friends in the Senate across the political spectrum."
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Carl Cannon and Lyle Denniston and Carl Cannon,Washington Bureau | June 11, 1993
WASHINGTON -- U.S. Circuit Judge Stephen Breyer edged forward noticeably yesterday in the final two-man competition for the vacancy on the Supreme Court, persons close to the selection process said last night.Amid signs that President Clinton could announce his choice tomorrow, the 54-year-old Boston judge appeared to be closer than Interior Secretary Bruce E. Babbitt to getting the nod to replace retiring Justice Byron R. White.The competition between Judge Breyer and Mr. Babbitt has been going on for several days, primarily in the mind of the president, said two highly placed White House officials.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | May 17, 1994
The consensus on Judge Breyer is that Bill incompetently made a brilliant choice. Which tells you something about a consensus.A lot of people feel better knowing that somewhere, somehow, somebody is being executed. Others feel worse.
NEWS
By Paul Richter and Paul Richter,Los Angeles Times | June 11, 1993
WASHINGTON -- White House officials met yesterday with U.S. Appeals Court Judge Stephen G. Breyer in a Boston hospital room where he is recuperating, signaling that the nearly three-month search for a Supreme Court justice may be winding down at last.Judge Breyer, injured in a bicycling accident, is expected to be released today from Mount Auburn Hospital and may fly to Washington for a meeting with President Clinton, aides said.The judge is believed to have recently edged ahead of Interior Secretary Bruce E. Babbitt as the president's choice to replace retiring Justice Byron R. White, and the meeting could seal the decision.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 11, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Supreme Court nominee Stephen G. Breyer goes before the Senate Judiciary Committee tomorrow with no apparent need to prove anything to win Senate approval, but with a real chance -- if he wants to take the risk -- to reveal more of the kind of justice he might be.The 55-year-old federal appeals judge from Boston was chosen eight weeks ago by President Clinton mainly to avoid any trouble with the Senate over a replacement for retiring Justice...
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Carl M. Cannon and Lyle Denniston and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau | June 14, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton found himself yesterday in the politically awkward position of having to depend upon the enthusiasm of Republicans to embolden him to go ahead with a Supreme Court nomination for Boston Judge Stephen G. Breyer.There was no word from the president about whether Judge Breyer, who had seemed all but assured of becoming the nominee three days ago, would now be put forward or be cast aside in the controversy over a failure to pay Social Security taxes for a housekeeper.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 16, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The Senate Judiciary Committee heard consumer advocate Ralph Nader roundly denounce Supreme Court nominee Stephen G. Breyer yesterday, but that blast was offset by the highest praise from the American Bar Association.After a day of listening to pros and cons about the nomination from public witnesses, highlighted by a testy match of wits between senators and Mr. Nader, the panel finished its hearings and planned to vote next week -- perhaps as early as Tuesday.Committee Chairman Joseph R. Biden Jr., a Delaware Democrat, said the full Senate might vote by the end of next week.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 15, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Showing flashes of anger over tough questioning about his investment portfolio, Supreme Court nominee Stephen G. Breyer promised the Senate Judiciary Committee yesterday that he will set up an unprecedented system to avoid ethical problems as a justice.His promise was so unusual and so broad, in fact, that two senators on the committee later urged him to reconsider it rather than have himself bound so tightly.Finishing his testimony before the panel, Judge Breyer appeared to be in no danger of losing support among senators.
NEWS
July 15, 1994
As expected, most members of the Senate Judiciary Committee have indicated their strong endorsement of Judge Stephen Breyer to become a Supreme Court justice. And properly so. He is an extremely capable jurist.But there was a discordant note in his confirmation hearings -- his investment in Lloyd's of London. That firm, as Sen. Howell Heflin said to Judge Breyer, "is known nationwide as insuring anything. So the idea of having an investment in Lloyd's of London raises some sort of issue pertaining as to whether or not, after going on the bench, you ought to have divested yourself of any interest in Lloyd's."
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 14, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Without making specific promises, Judge Stephen G. Breyer indicated to the Senate Judiciary Committee yesterday that he would not seek as a Supreme Court justice to overturn abortion rights or the death penalty.He explicitly said that he regarded both a woman's right to seek an abortion and states' power to execute murderers to be settled constitutional issues, and he implied strongly that he would seldom vote to overrule such rulings.In addition, he expressed a hesitancy about using the court's power to create rights beyond those mentioned specifically in the Constitution.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | July 14, 1994
SEN.HOWARD Metzenbaum criticized Judge Stephen Breyer at his confirmation hearing because he had not stepped aside in eight cases in which he might have had a slight conflict of interest.The real problem is that he had to and did step aside in all asbestos cases because he knew he had a more significant conflict of interest. Why is that a problem? Because he was hired to rule in cases like that. That's what we pay him for. He should never have compromised himself by making risky investments in Lloyd's of London (after he became a judge)
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 13, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Amid White House fears that Supreme Court nominee Stephen G. Breyer might get into trouble over judicial ethics, the judge himself insisted to senators yesterday that he did nothing wrong by ruling on cases potentially tied to one of his investments.No difficulty arose on that issue in his first day of questioning by the Senate Judiciary Committee, after Judge Breyer and the White House went to unusual lengths to dispel any suggestion that he might have improperly decided legal issues that might have influenced his financial stake in the global insurance market known as Lloyd's of London.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Carl M. Cannon and Lyle Denniston and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau | June 14, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton found himself yesterday in the politically awkward position of having to depend upon the enthusiasm of Republicans to embolden him to go ahead with a Supreme Court nomination for Boston Judge Stephen G. Breyer.There was no word from the president about whether Judge Breyer, who had seemed all but assured of becoming the nominee three days ago, would now be put forward or be cast aside in the controversy over a failure to pay Social Security taxes for a housekeeper.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | June 14, 1994
JUDGE Stephen Breyer, who will likely be confirmed to the Supreme Court next month by a nearly unanimous Senate, is a liberal much loved by economic conservatives. As a lead Senate staffer for Ted Kennedy in the 1970s, Judge Breyer championed economic deregulation. He was the only Carter appointee to the federal bench who Republican senators were willing to confirm after the 1980 election. As a federal appeals judge since 1980, Judge Breyer has been a leading foe of antitrust enforcement.
NEWS
July 12, 1994
Sen. Arlen Specter, the Pennsylvania Republican who is a member of the Judiciary Committee, says the panel has an obligation today to subject Judge Stephen Breyer to "the customary microscope" when it starts considering his nomination to the Supreme Court. It does, even in the case of a man who is already well known to many committee members because of his service as its counsel; even in the case of a nominee of such 24-karat credentials as to have been praised by a senator as liberal as Edward Kennedy and by one as conservative as Strom Thurmond.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 11, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Supreme Court nominee Stephen G. Breyer goes before the Senate Judiciary Committee tomorrow with no apparent need to prove anything to win Senate approval, but with a real chance -- if he wants to take the risk -- to reveal more of the kind of justice he might be.The 55-year-old federal appeals judge from Boston was chosen eight weeks ago by President Clinton mainly to avoid any trouble with the Senate over a replacement for retiring Justice...
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