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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2014
Baltimore has been the backdrop for so many historic moments -- the writing of the Star-Spangled Banner, Edgar Allan Poe's last bar crawl. Now, we can add another to the list. It was here, in 2005, that the love triangle among British actors Daniel Craig, Jude Law and Sienna Miller came to a head. Craig was in Baltimore to shoot "The Invasion," a forgettable re-working of "The Body Snatchers," when he received an unforgettable call from Law. Law wanted to know why Craig was hooking up with his then-girlfriend, Sienna Miller.
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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2014
Baltimore has been the backdrop for so many historic moments -- the writing of the Star-Spangled Banner, Edgar Allan Poe's last bar crawl. Now, we can add another to the list. It was here, in 2005, that the love triangle among British actors Daniel Craig, Jude Law and Sienna Miller came to a head. Craig was in Baltimore to shoot "The Invasion," a forgettable re-working of "The Body Snatchers," when he received an unforgettable call from Law. Law wanted to know why Craig was hooking up with his then-girlfriend, Sienna Miller.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 16, 2001
Early in the Battle of Stalingrad, when it looked as if Hitler's forces would deliver a death blow to the Red Army, a Soviet super-sniper named Vassili Zaitsev - a shepherd from the Urals - calmly began to pick off 242 German soldiers. For a dispirited Soviet citizenry, Vassili became a steppe-spanning symbol of proletariat resistance to fascism and devotion to the motherland. Out of Vassili's exploits, director Jean-Jacques Annaud and his co-writer, Alain Godard, have fashioned "Enemy at the Gates," a magnetic war film.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, b | July 14, 2011
A few talking points: •••• Paltrow clearly dies. And gambles. We're sure this happens early in the film or it wouldn't be in the trailer. But again, Paltrow dies. That's what you get for insisting to sing "Forget You" everywhere you go. •••• Matt Damon and Jude Law - ANGRY! •••• I actually buy Kate Winslet as a scientist. Nice job, Soderbergh. •••• Thanks for reminding us that people touch their mouths and then touch everything else.
FEATURES
December 9, 2005
Critic's Pick-- Jude Law (above, with Nicole Kidman) returns from the Civil War in Cold Mountain (9 p.m.-11:40 p.m., Starz).
NEWS
July 31, 2009
Jackson's mom to keep kids; Rowe gets visitation Katherine Jackson will raise her son's children under an agreement with the King of Pop's ex-wife, who will have visitation rights under the supervision of a child psychologist, attorneys said Thursday. The agreement calls for Michael Jackson's mother to remain guardian of the pop star's three children, who range in age from 7 to 12, in accordance with wishes spelled out in the singer's 2002 will. No money is changing hands as a result of the agreement, the statement said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, b | July 14, 2011
A few talking points: •••• Paltrow clearly dies. And gambles. We're sure this happens early in the film or it wouldn't be in the trailer. But again, Paltrow dies. That's what you get for insisting to sing "Forget You" everywhere you go. •••• Matt Damon and Jude Law - ANGRY! •••• I actually buy Kate Winslet as a scientist. Nice job, Soderbergh. •••• Thanks for reminding us that people touch their mouths and then touch everything else.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1998
Like most relationships, the one that's central to "Music From Another Room" takes a while to get going. So does the movie, but stick with it and you'll watch unfold a most beguiling romance.Little matter that it's not the romance the film is built on, a rather soulless pairing between a romantic who's been carrying a torch for 25 years and a pragmatic who can't squeeze passion into her schedule.Rather, the great romance here is between a blind woman and a geek in a robin's egg blue tux, two misfits who open new worlds for each other.
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By Carina Chocano and Carina Chocano,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 5, 2004
Things have changed since 1966, and Charles Shyer's remake of Alfie reminds us of just how much. The movie that introduced Michael Caine as a Cockney womanizer at the dawn of the Playboy era played like a warning label on the sexual revolution. Compared with the original, the new Alfie, which stars twinkly eyed Jude Law as a British limo driver in Manhattan, is a bright gumball skittering across a marble floor. We're meant to attribute the remake's decidedly chirpier, breezier tone to feminism and the all-around social progress of the intervening four decades.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 28, 2005
From the opening moment of last night's 77th Annual Academy Awards, Chris Rock brought an energy to the telecast unlike anything seen in years. The audience greeted him with a standing ovation, and he responded with an opening monologue that was a tad profane, a bit political and almost funny enough to warrant all the pre-show hype. "Sit your [expletives] down," he shouted to the hall full of standing celebrities, less than 10 seconds after hitting the stage - in case anyone thought he would go totally G-rated for prime-time network television.
NEWS
July 31, 2009
Jackson's mom to keep kids; Rowe gets visitation Katherine Jackson will raise her son's children under an agreement with the King of Pop's ex-wife, who will have visitation rights under the supervision of a child psychologist, attorneys said Thursday. The agreement calls for Michael Jackson's mother to remain guardian of the pop star's three children, who range in age from 7 to 12, in accordance with wishes spelled out in the singer's 2002 will. No money is changing hands as a result of the agreement, the statement said.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Anne Tallent and Rob Hiaasen and Anne Tallent,Sun Reporters | July 16, 2007
With the arrival of David Beckham and wife Victoria, the former Posh Spice, in Los Angeles, and the airing of Victoria Beckham: Coming to America tonight on NBC, we decided to chart British imports that have translated well here as well as others that didn't - the monarchy, for one. Of course, the "British Invasion" gave us the Beatles, the Rolling Stones and the Troggs, but we could have done without S Club 7. And thanks again and again for James Bond,...
FEATURES
December 9, 2005
Critic's Pick-- Jude Law (above, with Nicole Kidman) returns from the Civil War in Cold Mountain (9 p.m.-11:40 p.m., Starz).
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 28, 2005
From the opening moment of last night's 77th Annual Academy Awards, Chris Rock brought an energy to the telecast unlike anything seen in years. The audience greeted him with a standing ovation, and he responded with an opening monologue that was a tad profane, a bit political and almost funny enough to warrant all the pre-show hype. "Sit your [expletives] down," he shouted to the hall full of standing celebrities, less than 10 seconds after hitting the stage - in case anyone thought he would go totally G-rated for prime-time network television.
FEATURES
By Carina Chocano and Carina Chocano,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 5, 2004
Things have changed since 1966, and Charles Shyer's remake of Alfie reminds us of just how much. The movie that introduced Michael Caine as a Cockney womanizer at the dawn of the Playboy era played like a warning label on the sexual revolution. Compared with the original, the new Alfie, which stars twinkly eyed Jude Law as a British limo driver in Manhattan, is a bright gumball skittering across a marble floor. We're meant to attribute the remake's decidedly chirpier, breezier tone to feminism and the all-around social progress of the intervening four decades.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 16, 2001
Early in the Battle of Stalingrad, when it looked as if Hitler's forces would deliver a death blow to the Red Army, a Soviet super-sniper named Vassili Zaitsev - a shepherd from the Urals - calmly began to pick off 242 German soldiers. For a dispirited Soviet citizenry, Vassili became a steppe-spanning symbol of proletariat resistance to fascism and devotion to the motherland. Out of Vassili's exploits, director Jean-Jacques Annaud and his co-writer, Alain Godard, have fashioned "Enemy at the Gates," a magnetic war film.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 5, 1998
"Wilde" is a worthy movie that, although helped considerably by Stephen Fry's bravura performance, never breaks out of its static, episodic structure.As the playwright, author and raconteur Oscar Wilde, Fry could not be more perfectly cast. He brings enormous reserves of quiet sympathy and humanity to a man who might otherwise have been reduced to a mere character.If "Wilde" contents itself with concentrating on the most notorious events of Wilde's life, re-telling them through a theatrical series of vignettes, Fry's portrayal is inspired.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Anne Tallent and Rob Hiaasen and Anne Tallent,Sun Reporters | July 16, 2007
With the arrival of David Beckham and wife Victoria, the former Posh Spice, in Los Angeles, and the airing of Victoria Beckham: Coming to America tonight on NBC, we decided to chart British imports that have translated well here as well as others that didn't - the monarchy, for one. Of course, the "British Invasion" gave us the Beatles, the Rolling Stones and the Troggs, but we could have done without S Club 7. And thanks again and again for James Bond,...
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1998
Like most relationships, the one that's central to "Music From Another Room" takes a while to get going. So does the movie, but stick with it and you'll watch unfold a most beguiling romance.Little matter that it's not the romance the film is built on, a rather soulless pairing between a romantic who's been carrying a torch for 25 years and a pragmatic who can't squeeze passion into her schedule.Rather, the great romance here is between a blind woman and a geek in a robin's egg blue tux, two misfits who open new worlds for each other.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 5, 1998
"Wilde" is a worthy movie that, although helped considerably by Stephen Fry's bravura performance, never breaks out of its static, episodic structure.As the playwright, author and raconteur Oscar Wilde, Fry could not be more perfectly cast. He brings enormous reserves of quiet sympathy and humanity to a man who might otherwise have been reduced to a mere character.If "Wilde" contents itself with concentrating on the most notorious events of Wilde's life, re-telling them through a theatrical series of vignettes, Fry's portrayal is inspired.
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