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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | December 19, 2007
Grab-bag movie parodies have been bonanzas ever since that slapstick disaster epic Airplane! in 1980. Yet few have matched that film's nonstop hilarity until this week's Walk Hard, starring John C. Reilly as fictional rock-'n'-roller Dewey Cox in an unbuttoned burlesque of musical biopics like Walk the Line. "No woman ever walks into these movies unless the hero is going to make her a mistress or marry her," says the producer and co-writer, Judd Apatow, "because no one can enter a scene in this kind of movie who isn't essential to the story."
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 23, 2008
Like many a movie lover and even some Hollywood insiders, Ron Shelton, a writer-director of classic sports comedies, found himself going through comedy withdrawal last fall and winter, when the studios left farce off their schedules and stuffed them instead with protest films and message movies. "Shouldn't we be desperate for laughs when it's dark and gloomy?" Shelton asks, over the phone from sunny Ojai, Calif. "Shouldn't we want comedy in the winter? And who ever said that serious movies can't have a sense of humor?"
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 1, 2007
Judd Apatow is the best friend the schlubs of the world have ever had, for in the world he's created onscreen, they always get the girl. And not just any girl, but the most beautiful girl. Knocked Up continues the tradition Apatow started in 2005's The 40-Year-Old Virgin, where Steve Carell, as cinema's most inexperienced, least refined lothario, ended up with Catherine Keener anyway. Here, it's Seth Rogen as an arrested adolescent who believes life is best lived stoned and whose aspiration is to create a Web site listing every nude scene ever filmed.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | April 18, 2008
Forgetting Sarah Marshall is a male rescue fantasy played for drop-your-pants farce. The love of a good woman saves a romantic sad sack - and redefines the male weepie as comedy. In the old-style male weepie, men in the audience fight back tears as their heroic counterpart on screen maintains composure while losing a lover or comrade. He cries at the peak of heartbreak, and it's cathartic, even for him. Forgetting Sarah Marshall (Universal Pictures) Jason Segel, Kristen Bell, Mila Kunis, Russell Brand.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 21, 2007
The division between explosive, authentic sexual humor and clumsy, boorish exploitation is no "fine line" - it's more of a natural boundary, as broad as the Pacific. Moviemakers like Judd Apatow (The 40-Year-Old Virgin, Knocked Up) and, at their best, the Farrelly brothers (There's Something About Mary) have helped energize recent American comedies with a zesty vernacular frankness about male romantic cluelessness and female bewilderment. These filmmakers empathize with and satirize their antiheroes while portraying their heroines as women yearning to be known in more than just a sexual sense.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 19, 2005
People see the name of this movie and get defensive. What's wrong with being a virgin? they ask. Absolutely nothing, and that's part of the point of The 40-Year-Old Virgin, probably the most sweet-spirited sex comedy ever made. It's pretty funny, too. Steve Carell, hilarious as clueless weatherman Brick Tamland in last year's Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy, scores again in Virgin as ... well, the title pretty much says it all. But the movie isn't about one characterization, or even one character.
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 23, 2008
Like many a movie lover and even some Hollywood insiders, Ron Shelton, a writer-director of classic sports comedies, found himself going through comedy withdrawal last fall and winter, when the studios left farce off their schedules and stuffed them instead with protest films and message movies. "Shouldn't we be desperate for laughs when it's dark and gloomy?" Shelton asks, over the phone from sunny Ojai, Calif. "Shouldn't we want comedy in the winter? And who ever said that serious movies can't have a sense of humor?"
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By New York Times News Service | July 4, 1994
You can't be too thin or, for that matter, too rich in Hollywood. Ask Andrea King.Ms. King, a former journalist and now screenwriter, says she's certainly not rich (by Hollywood standards) and obviously not thin. She views the weight issue with a mixture of pain and dark humor."Being overweight has actually served me professionally," she said, in something of an understatement. She has just sold a screenplay to Steven Spielberg about an overweight woman in her 30s who vaguely resembles herself.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | April 18, 2008
Forgetting Sarah Marshall is a male rescue fantasy played for drop-your-pants farce. The love of a good woman saves a romantic sad sack - and redefines the male weepie as comedy. In the old-style male weepie, men in the audience fight back tears as their heroic counterpart on screen maintains composure while losing a lover or comrade. He cries at the peak of heartbreak, and it's cathartic, even for him. Forgetting Sarah Marshall (Universal Pictures) Jason Segel, Kristen Bell, Mila Kunis, Russell Brand.
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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2013
Actor and Maryland native Edward Norton could be ready to take on the role of father. According to US Weekly, Norton's fiancee Shauna Robertson is expecting, due "any day now. " Norton's publicist told Insider Tuesday that she couldn't comment one way or the other about the star's personal life. Robertson is a film producer who has worked on a number of Judd Apatow movies including "Knocked up" and "The 40-Year-Old Virgin. " The couple, along with others, co-founded Crowdrise, a website that helps people raise money for causes.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | December 19, 2007
Grab-bag movie parodies have been bonanzas ever since that slapstick disaster epic Airplane! in 1980. Yet few have matched that film's nonstop hilarity until this week's Walk Hard, starring John C. Reilly as fictional rock-'n'-roller Dewey Cox in an unbuttoned burlesque of musical biopics like Walk the Line. "No woman ever walks into these movies unless the hero is going to make her a mistress or marry her," says the producer and co-writer, Judd Apatow, "because no one can enter a scene in this kind of movie who isn't essential to the story."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 21, 2007
The division between explosive, authentic sexual humor and clumsy, boorish exploitation is no "fine line" - it's more of a natural boundary, as broad as the Pacific. Moviemakers like Judd Apatow (The 40-Year-Old Virgin, Knocked Up) and, at their best, the Farrelly brothers (There's Something About Mary) have helped energize recent American comedies with a zesty vernacular frankness about male romantic cluelessness and female bewilderment. These filmmakers empathize with and satirize their antiheroes while portraying their heroines as women yearning to be known in more than just a sexual sense.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 1, 2007
Judd Apatow is the best friend the schlubs of the world have ever had, for in the world he's created onscreen, they always get the girl. And not just any girl, but the most beautiful girl. Knocked Up continues the tradition Apatow started in 2005's The 40-Year-Old Virgin, where Steve Carell, as cinema's most inexperienced, least refined lothario, ended up with Catherine Keener anyway. Here, it's Seth Rogen as an arrested adolescent who believes life is best lived stoned and whose aspiration is to create a Web site listing every nude scene ever filmed.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 19, 2005
People see the name of this movie and get defensive. What's wrong with being a virgin? they ask. Absolutely nothing, and that's part of the point of The 40-Year-Old Virgin, probably the most sweet-spirited sex comedy ever made. It's pretty funny, too. Steve Carell, hilarious as clueless weatherman Brick Tamland in last year's Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy, scores again in Virgin as ... well, the title pretty much says it all. But the movie isn't about one characterization, or even one character.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | July 4, 1994
You can't be too thin or, for that matter, too rich in Hollywood. Ask Andrea King.Ms. King, a former journalist and now screenwriter, says she's certainly not rich (by Hollywood standards) and obviously not thin. She views the weight issue with a mixture of pain and dark humor."Being overweight has actually served me professionally," she said, in something of an understatement. She has just sold a screenplay to Steven Spielberg about an overweight woman in her 30s who vaguely resembles herself.
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April 7, 2011
Jason Winer comes to feature films from TV's "Modern Family. " But he always dreamed that someday he'd make movies. These are three of the filmmakers who helped shape his approach to directing: Woody Allen "From an early age, I was oddly into Woody Allen — like, when I was 7 years old. From a very early age, I enjoyed watching 'Annie Hall.' I watched it again in preparation for 'Arthur' because it was another iconic New York movie. I was watching it and wondering, 'What did I possibly love about it when I was 8 years old?
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By Michael Sragow | July 24, 2009
Up . . ( 4 STARS) If you haven't seen it, make sure you see it for the first time in a theater. The genius bar at Pixar has crafted this seriocomic fable about a 78-year-old widower who recaptures his zest for life with the help of a 9-year-old-boy as an old-fashioned sweeping adventure with inventive contemporary twists. In this 70th anniversary year, no film out today better captures the spirit of Hollywood movies circa 1939. Opening next Friday Aliens In The Attic : (20th Century Fox)
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