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By John Eisenberg and John Eisenberg,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2000
SYDNEY, Australia - The only two Americans to make the finals in the Olympic boxing competition lost today, leaving the United States without a boxing gold medal in the Games for the first time since 1948. "It's a tough thing," U.S. coach Tom Mustin said after featherweight Ricardo Juarez and light-welterweight Ricardo Williams Jr. lost decisions at the Sydney Exhibition Center. The United States entered the Games with high expectations and three world champions on the team. Some observers felt this might be the best U.S. team since 1976.
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Sports Digest | December 15, 2013
  Laurel Park Apprentice Juarez wins with his first career mount Apprentice Nik Juarez won with his first lifetime mount when odds-on favorite Love Heart beat six other $5,000 claimers in the fifth race Saturday at Laurel Park. Juarez, 20, who is the son of former rider Calixto Juarez and the grandson of exercise rider Charlie Linton , broke just a little tardily aboard Love Heart as the field left the starting gate in the six furlong test. Juarez was unfazed as he carefully steered the daughter of Lion Heart to the outside and slowly gained on the leaders, finally reaching the front a furlong from home.
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NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2004
This was supposed to be a season of celebration for Shannon Pierre-Jerome. Her senior prom was last night, her Lansdowne High School graduation ceremony is next week, and her future awaits her at Towson University. The 17-year-old honor student and cheerleading captain was in critical condition last night at Maryland Shock Trauma Center, according to a hospital spokesman. And her live-in boyfriend, 24-year-old Juan Pablo Navarro Juarez, was being held without bail at the Baltimore County Detention Center, charged with trying to kill her, police said.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2005
Her voice -- once so commanding that she was captain of her high school cheerleading team -- quivered and faltered, reduced to something of a husky stage whisper. She stumbled over words that used to trip flawlessly off her tongue in English and Spanish. And the dark hair that once fell in gentle waves to her shoulders now clings to her head in tight curls, hiding the scars that zigzag across her skull from so many surgeries. "I obtained numerous permanent scars all over my body, but the emotional scars I obtained hurt the deepest," Shannon Pierre-Jerome, 18, told a judge yesterday.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 4, 2004
MEXICO CITY - The body of a young woman was discovered yesterday in a busy intersection in downtown Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, renewing concerns among human rights groups in that border city that the decade-long pattern of such killings continues. Authorities in Chihuahua state, where Juarez is located, played down any link between the latest victim, who appeared to have been strangled, and the sex slayings of almost 100 women in Juarez and its environs since 1993. "The woman is between the ages of 24 and 27, and our initial autopsy shows that she was strangled," said Claudia Elena Banuelos Mendoza, a spokeswoman for the state attorney general's office in Juarez.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee | June 22, 1991
Running through a driving rain that hit some 15 minutes before post time, Miss Horatius nipped Tiny Grasshopper by a nose in the $14,500 feature at Pimlico Race Course yesterday.Tiny Grasshopper easily overtook Soot's Orphan in the turn in the six-furlong ninth race, but Miss Horatius angled to the inside for the drive and caught her in the last stride.The triumph was the seventh in the 16-race career of Miss Horatius, who was ridden yesterday by apprentice Calixto Juarez. She paid $7.80 to win as second choice in a field of six 3-year-old fillies.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2005
Prosecutors can use at trial the statements made to police by a man accused of trying to kill his 17-year-old girlfriend last May in Towson, a judge ruled yesterday. A lawyer for Juan Pablo Navarro Juarez, scheduled to go on trial next week on a charge of attempted first-degree murder, had sought to have the audiotaped statement thrown out. The lawyer argued that the 25-year-old Mexican immigrant was unfamiliar with police practices in the United States and had spoken to detectives after having been hit with a flashlight during his arrest and having gotten little to no sleep in the day or two before the interrogation.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee | April 15, 1991
J.R.'s Horizon ran well enough last year to earn a Preakness berth. He didn't come close, as history will forever note, to winning his first stakes.That came yesterday. The gelding that trainer Meredith "Mert" Bailes called "Little J.R." led for every step in the $125,000 John B. Campbell Handicap at Pimlico Race Course, barely holding off an inside rally from favored Reputed Testamony.The 4-year-old was ridden by Calixto Juarez, a 20-year-old apprentice who was also winning his first stakes.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2005
Her voice -- once so commanding that she was captain of her high school cheerleading team -- quivered and faltered, reduced to something of a husky stage whisper. She stumbled over words that used to trip flawlessly off her tongue in English and Spanish. And the dark hair that once fell in gentle waves to her shoulders now clings to her head in tight curls, hiding the scars that zigzag across her skull from so many surgeries. "I obtained numerous permanent scars all over my body, but the emotional scars I obtained hurt the deepest," Shannon Pierre-Jerome, 18, told a judge yesterday.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara | January 2, 2004
LEON, Mexico - Another of those melancholy stories appeared in one of the local newspapers recently, about a young woman gone missing in Ciudad Juarez, up on the border. She had "light brown skin, long black hair;" she was "slender." That physical description would match millions of Mexican women; it's an archetype of this Mestizo country. About 10 days after she disappeared, her mother went to the news media. The story didn't say she reported it to the police, but no one would be surprised if she hadn't.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2005
Prosecutors can use at trial the statements made to police by a man accused of trying to kill his 17-year-old girlfriend last May in Towson, a judge ruled yesterday. A lawyer for Juan Pablo Navarro Juarez, scheduled to go on trial next week on a charge of attempted first-degree murder, had sought to have the audiotaped statement thrown out. The lawyer argued that the 25-year-old Mexican immigrant was unfamiliar with police practices in the United States and had spoken to detectives after having been hit with a flashlight during his arrest and having gotten little to no sleep in the day or two before the interrogation.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 4, 2004
MEXICO CITY - The body of a young woman was discovered yesterday in a busy intersection in downtown Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, renewing concerns among human rights groups in that border city that the decade-long pattern of such killings continues. Authorities in Chihuahua state, where Juarez is located, played down any link between the latest victim, who appeared to have been strangled, and the sex slayings of almost 100 women in Juarez and its environs since 1993. "The woman is between the ages of 24 and 27, and our initial autopsy shows that she was strangled," said Claudia Elena Banuelos Mendoza, a spokeswoman for the state attorney general's office in Juarez.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2004
This was supposed to be a season of celebration for Shannon Pierre-Jerome. Her senior prom was last night, her Lansdowne High School graduation ceremony is next week, and her future awaits her at Towson University. The 17-year-old honor student and cheerleading captain was in critical condition last night at Maryland Shock Trauma Center, according to a hospital spokesman. And her live-in boyfriend, 24-year-old Juan Pablo Navarro Juarez, was being held without bail at the Baltimore County Detention Center, charged with trying to kill her, police said.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara | January 2, 2004
LEON, Mexico - Another of those melancholy stories appeared in one of the local newspapers recently, about a young woman gone missing in Ciudad Juarez, up on the border. She had "light brown skin, long black hair;" she was "slender." That physical description would match millions of Mexican women; it's an archetype of this Mestizo country. About 10 days after she disappeared, her mother went to the news media. The story didn't say she reported it to the police, but no one would be surprised if she hadn't.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 21, 2001
EL PASO, Texas - Stuart England installed a television in his van last week because his commute home from Ciudad Juarez, the Mexican border town where he works, has been too excruciating to bear since Sept. 11. He can use some diversion while stuck in the seemingly endless queues of cars waiting to cross the Paso del Norte bridge into El Paso, Texas. "I saw someone in line next to me with a TV and I was trying to watch it, so I figured I should get my own," said England, a manager in a maquiladora, a factory where materials are imported from the United States, assembled duty-free and sent back across the border.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg and John Eisenberg,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2000
SYDNEY, Australia - The only two Americans to make the finals in the Olympic boxing competition lost today, leaving the United States without a boxing gold medal in the Games for the first time since 1948. "It's a tough thing," U.S. coach Tom Mustin said after featherweight Ricardo Juarez and light-welterweight Ricardo Williams Jr. lost decisions at the Sydney Exhibition Center. The United States entered the Games with high expectations and three world champions on the team. Some observers felt this might be the best U.S. team since 1976.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 12, 1999
MEXICO CITY -- Families of missing people are reeling and some American anti-drug agents are scratching their heads over recent denials by the FBI and Mexican authorities that dozens of bodies might be buried at remote ranches outside of Ciudad Juarez, not far from the border with El Paso, Texas.But odd twists and turns in criminal investigations are nothing new to frustrated Juarez victims' rights activists accustomed to disappointment in a city where brazen crime and graft are routine.After two weeks of digging at two of four ranches that some officials initially called possible mass grave sites that might hold as many as 100 bodies, remains of eight men have been unearthed and are being studied by FBI forensics specialists in El Paso.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,Staff Writer | October 22, 1993
EL PASO -- Out of economic and social need, many people in El Paso and its Mexican sister city, Ciudad Juarez, ignored the international border that separates them.With relative ease, people from Juarez came to El Paso each day to work in low-skilled jobs where they were paid less than the typical U.S. wage but up to three times more than what they could earn in a Mexican factory. They would spend the bulk of their money in U.S. stores, where food and clothing costs less than half of such goods in Mexico.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 12, 1999
MEXICO CITY -- Families of missing people are reeling and some American anti-drug agents are scratching their heads over recent denials by the FBI and Mexican authorities that dozens of bodies might be buried at remote ranches outside of Ciudad Juarez, not far from the border with El Paso, Texas.But odd twists and turns in criminal investigations are nothing new to frustrated Juarez victims' rights activists accustomed to disappointment in a city where brazen crime and graft are routine.After two weeks of digging at two of four ranches that some officials initially called possible mass grave sites that might hold as many as 100 bodies, remains of eight men have been unearthed and are being studied by FBI forensics specialists in El Paso.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,Staff Writer | October 22, 1993
EL PASO -- Out of economic and social need, many people in El Paso and its Mexican sister city, Ciudad Juarez, ignored the international border that separates them.With relative ease, people from Juarez came to El Paso each day to work in low-skilled jobs where they were paid less than the typical U.S. wage but up to three times more than what they could earn in a Mexican factory. They would spend the bulk of their money in U.S. stores, where food and clothing costs less than half of such goods in Mexico.
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