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NEWS
October 27, 2010
Incredibly, Juan Williams still does not understand what was wrong with what he said about Muslims on national TV ( "Williams still 'roiled' by his firing," Oct. 27). Here is the quote: "Political correctness can lead to some kind of paralysis where you don't address reality. I mean, look, Bill, I'm not a bigot. You know the kind of books I've written about the civil rights movement in this country. But when I get on a plane, I got to tell you, if I see people who are in Muslim garb and I think, you know, they're identifying themselves first and foremost as Muslims, I get worried.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 18, 2013
The headline "Principled or polarizing" on Juan Williams' op-ed (June 14) was a perfect description! Sen. Elizabeth Warren is principled. Sen. Ted Cruz is polarizing. Ms. Warren is trying to accomplish laws to help the average citizen with no desire for publicity. Mr. Cruz is all about tearing apart citizens while grandstanding on every news show he can. This opinion piece of yours showcases the difference of intention between these two senators more than you realize. P.S.: James Carville is sly like a fox. He would love nothing more than for Republicans to promote Senator Cruz as he underlines the negative for the GOP and garners even more voters for Democrats.
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NEWS
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2010
After nearly a week of reflection on his abrupt firing from National Public Radio, commentator Juan Williams said Tuesday he believes he did not breach "any journalistic ethics" when he said on television that he felt unsettled when passengers dressed in Muslim garb board airplanes. "Over the weekend, people would say to me, 'Oh, you just got a new deal from Fox? Congratulations, that it all worked out so well,'" Williams said in an interview with the Baltimore Sun following an address at the University of Maryland School of Law that earned him a standing ovation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2012
Honestly, I have been thinking about this segment on Sean Hannity's Wednesday night show for the last 24 hours trying to figure out if it a great cable news segment or the embodiment of so much of what is wrong with prime-time cable news TV. I am not being disingenuous when I ask readers to tell me what you think. I know one thing, while I disagree on a million matters with Malkin, if I was a programmer trying to get ratings for my cable news channel, she is one of the first people I would try to hire.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2012
Honestly, I have been thinking about this segment on Sean Hannity's Wednesday night show for the last 24 hours trying to figure out if it a great cable news segment or the embodiment of so much of what is wrong with prime-time cable news TV. I am not being disingenuous when I ask readers to tell me what you think. I know one thing, while I disagree on a million matters with Malkin, if I was a programmer trying to get ratings for my cable news channel, she is one of the first people I would try to hire.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | October 26, 2010
Our journalism world made news itself the other day when National Public Radio fired one of its longtime stars, Juan Williams, ostensibly for expressing a personal opinion on Fox News not to the liking of NPR managers. In saying he gets "worried" and "nervous" when he sees a fellow passenger on a plane dressed "in Muslim garb," Mr. Williams, an NPR statement declared, was "inconsistent with our editorial standards and practices, and undermined his credibility as a news analyst with NPR. " Never mind that he said later on the same Fox show that it was wrong to finger all Muslims as "extremists.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | April 25, 2001
Juan Williams commands two very different, very prominent public pulpits. Four days a week, he is the host of National Public Radio's "Talk of the Nation," a two-hour sanctuary for thoughtful, sometimes provocative discussion of issues in the public eye. Sundays, he is a pundit on the weekly political talk show "Fox News Sunday," on which he has appeared almost since the first show. (It is celebrating its five-year anniversary this Sunday.) During the week, Williams acts as the reasonable arbiter, led by common sense to tease out greater truths.
NEWS
November 30, 2011
Letter writer Elizabeth Fixsen commends The Sun for hiring conservative columnist Ron Smith by contrasting it with the difficulty of finding a liberal voice such as Thomas Schaller's in conservative media such as The Washington Times, The Wall Street Journal and Fox News ("A conservative voice on a liberal page," Nov. 26). Evidently she does not listen to Fox News, or she would certainly have heard the liberal views often expressed there by such commentators as Leslie Marshall, Alan Colmes, Juan Williams, Bob Bickel and others who appear on the network.
NEWS
June 18, 2013
The headline "Principled or polarizing" on Juan Williams' op-ed (June 14) was a perfect description! Sen. Elizabeth Warren is principled. Sen. Ted Cruz is polarizing. Ms. Warren is trying to accomplish laws to help the average citizen with no desire for publicity. Mr. Cruz is all about tearing apart citizens while grandstanding on every news show he can. This opinion piece of yours showcases the difference of intention between these two senators more than you realize. P.S.: James Carville is sly like a fox. He would love nothing more than for Republicans to promote Senator Cruz as he underlines the negative for the GOP and garners even more voters for Democrats.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2011
American television is generally awful when it comes to talking about race. Afraid of possibly offending anyone and absolutely terrified of tackling complex subject matter, most networks and major cable channels have come to largely avoid the topic in recent years — even during Black History Month. That timid TV backdrop is part of what makes HBO's "Thurgood," which debuts at 9 p.m. Thursday, such a special program. The film version of the one-man play starring Laurence Fishburne as Thurgood Marshall, the Baltimore-born civil rights attorney and the first black Supreme Court justice,l is one of the most frank, informed and searing discussions of race you will ever see on TV. But that exploration of African-American identity is only of several factors that distinguishes this production written and produced by 14-time Emmy-winner George Stevens Jr., of " Kennedy Center Honors" acclaim.
NEWS
November 30, 2011
Letter writer Elizabeth Fixsen commends The Sun for hiring conservative columnist Ron Smith by contrasting it with the difficulty of finding a liberal voice such as Thomas Schaller's in conservative media such as The Washington Times, The Wall Street Journal and Fox News ("A conservative voice on a liberal page," Nov. 26). Evidently she does not listen to Fox News, or she would certainly have heard the liberal views often expressed there by such commentators as Leslie Marshall, Alan Colmes, Juan Williams, Bob Bickel and others who appear on the network.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2011
Lisa Simeone thinks the media storm over whether, as an NPR show host, she should also be an activist for an Occupy D.C. protest group is "really overblown. " "Maybe that's my naivete speaking," the 54-year-old Baltimore broadcaster said in an interview Friday. "It just strikes me as 'My God, such a big hoo-haw over this.'" But it is big hoo-haw for National Public Radio, which has spent much of the last year at the center of fierce and partisan debates about its politics.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2011
Baltimore broadcaster Lisa Simeone fired back Wednesday night after a National Public Radio spokeswoman told the Baltimore Sun that NPR was looking into her role as a spokesman for a group involved in the Occupy D.C. movement. The public radio veteran expressed puzzlement as to why NPR "objects" to her exercising her "rights as a citizen," and she questioned why such big-name NPR correspondents and hosts as Mara Liaason, Scott Simon and Cokie Roberts are allowed to operate under what appears to be a different standard than the one being applied to her. At issue is whether NPR feels her activities on behalf of the overtly partisan group are acceptable in light of her role as host of NPR's "World of Opera.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2011
National Public radio says it is looking into the role that  Baltimore resident Lisa Simeone is playing as a spokeswoman for October 2011, one of the Occupy D.C. groups encamped at Freedom Plaza in Washington. A profile on National Public Radio's "People at NPR" web page describes Simeone as host of the nationally syndicated "World of Opera" and "Spoleto Chamber Music 2010. " She also hosts the documentary series "Soundprint," according to that production's website. Simeone formerly worked at the NPR news programs "All Things Considered" and "Weekend Edition.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2011
Amid a string of negative news reports, two high-level firings and a move in Congress to end its federal funding, National Public Radio was an organization in turmoil this week. But as grim as it seems for NPR, it is not the large public radio network headquartered in Washington that could suffer the most from the political fallout. Instead, small niche public radio stations like Towson's WTMD and Morgan State University's WEAA in Northeast Baltimore would be the hardest hit. And the cutbacks could start in a matter of weeks, station managers say. "We have a very limited relationship with NPR — we carry only one half-hour of programming from there a week," says LaFontaine E. Oliver, general manager of WEAA (88.9-FM)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2011
American television is generally awful when it comes to talking about race. Afraid of possibly offending anyone and absolutely terrified of tackling complex subject matter, most networks and major cable channels have come to largely avoid the topic in recent years — even during Black History Month. That timid TV backdrop is part of what makes HBO's "Thurgood," which debuts at 9 p.m. Thursday, such a special program. The film version of the one-man play starring Laurence Fishburne as Thurgood Marshall, the Baltimore-born civil rights attorney and the first black Supreme Court justice,l is one of the most frank, informed and searing discussions of race you will ever see on TV. But that exploration of African-American identity is only of several factors that distinguishes this production written and produced by 14-time Emmy-winner George Stevens Jr., of " Kennedy Center Honors" acclaim.
FEATURES
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN STAFF | October 18, 1998
"Thurgood Marshall: American Revolutionary," by Juan Williams. Times Books (Random House). 404 pages. $27.50.No one - not even Martin Luther King Jr. - is more a folk hero to African-Americans than Baltimore's own, Thurgood Marshall. And justly so: It was Marshall who fashioned the legal strategy that finally began the dismantling of racial segregation in American life.And it was Marshall, civil rights lawyer, federal judge, government advocate, and the first of his race to become a Supreme Court justice, who bequeathed a potential life of equality to even the poorest in the most neglected and pathetic ghetto.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2011
National Public radio says it is looking into the role that  Baltimore resident Lisa Simeone is playing as a spokeswoman for October 2011, one of the Occupy D.C. groups encamped at Freedom Plaza in Washington. A profile on National Public Radio's "People at NPR" web page describes Simeone as host of the nationally syndicated "World of Opera" and "Spoleto Chamber Music 2010. " She also hosts the documentary series "Soundprint," according to that production's website. Simeone formerly worked at the NPR news programs "All Things Considered" and "Weekend Edition.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | October 27, 2010
First, a confession: I listen to NPR. Sometimes, when I have to explain this fact to my right-wing brethren, I'll forgo trying to make the case that much of what NPR does is simply great radio and instead I'll note that it's more useful to listen to enemy broadcasts than more friendly fare. This is a serious point. Like never before, it's now possible to get all of your news from avowedly nonliberal or explicitly right-wing media outlets. (It's been possible to dine exclusively on liberal fare since World War II, at least)
NEWS
October 27, 2010
Incredibly, Juan Williams still does not understand what was wrong with what he said about Muslims on national TV ( "Williams still 'roiled' by his firing," Oct. 27). Here is the quote: "Political correctness can lead to some kind of paralysis where you don't address reality. I mean, look, Bill, I'm not a bigot. You know the kind of books I've written about the civil rights movement in this country. But when I get on a plane, I got to tell you, if I see people who are in Muslim garb and I think, you know, they're identifying themselves first and foremost as Muslims, I get worried.
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