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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 3, 2000
LAUSANNE, Switzerland - It is a quiet morning at the International Olympic Committee, and the patriarch of world sports allows himself a wistful thought: If only he had retired after his crowning glory, the spectacular 1992 Summer Olympics in his hometown. "Retiring myself after the Barcelona Games, I could have been a hero, no?" asks IOC President Juan Antonio Samaranch. "I cannot regret. I have to write my history again." As he prepares to go to Sydney, Australia, in September for the final Summer Games of his 20-year reign, Samaranch's legacy is in jeopardy.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 3, 2000
LAUSANNE, Switzerland - It is a quiet morning at the International Olympic Committee, and the patriarch of world sports allows himself a wistful thought: If only he had retired after his crowning glory, the spectacular 1992 Summer Olympics in his hometown. "Retiring myself after the Barcelona Games, I could have been a hero, no?" asks IOC President Juan Antonio Samaranch. "I cannot regret. I have to write my history again." As he prepares to go to Sydney, Australia, in September for the final Summer Games of his 20-year reign, Samaranch's legacy is in jeopardy.
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SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | January 26, 1999
Now I know what I want to be when I grow up. A member of the International Olympic Committee. They've got a few openings now, don't they? Six expulsions, three resignations, three other members still under investigation. Put me in, Your Excellency, I'm ready to play. Your Excellency, of course, is His Excellency, Juan Antonio Samaranch. That's what he demands to be called, even in Olympic contracts. And he's not going anywhere, baby. Samaranch -- president of the IOC, chancellor of the exchequer, whatever you want to call him -- said again yesterday that he does not plan to resign.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | January 26, 1999
Now I know what I want to be when I grow up. A member of the International Olympic Committee. They've got a few openings now, don't they? Six expulsions, three resignations, three other members still under investigation. Put me in, Your Excellency, I'm ready to play. Your Excellency, of course, is His Excellency, Juan Antonio Samaranch. That's what he demands to be called, even in Olympic contracts. And he's not going anywhere, baby. Samaranch -- president of the IOC, chancellor of the exchequer, whatever you want to call him -- said again yesterday that he does not plan to resign.
SPORTS
September 23, 1993
Auto racing2 Thunder -- Named Ed Kennedy equipment manager.OlympicsInternational Olympic Committee -- Re-elected president Juan Antonio Samaranch, 73, of Spain to another four-year term. Re-elected Anita DeFrantz of the United States to a four-year term on the 11-person executive board. Elected Marc Hodler of Switzerland, president of the international ski federation, vice president. Elected Keba Mbaye of Senegal to the executive board for one year.SoccerWichita Wings (NPSL) -- Re-signed F Chico Borja and G Nat Gonzalez to one-year deals and G Kris Peat to a two-year deal.
SPORTS
February 2, 1998
Days until opening ceremonies: 5.Snowfall: No new snow in Nagano City or on men's downhill course. That left 6.7 inches in Nagano City, and 85 inches on the downhill course.Update: More than 1,600 people joined a charity walk led by IOC president Juan Antonio Samaranch and anti-mine activist and Nobel Peace laureate Jody Williams.Going for the gold: Austrian Hermann Maier won his fourth straight World Cup Super G yesterday in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany. Maier, a candidate for four gold medals at the Nagano Games and the runaway World Cup leader, is unbeaten in the discipline this season and has won 10 races overall.
NEWS
March 19, 1999
EXPULSION of six International Olympic Committee members, joining four who quit, is one step out of the pit the IOC has dug for itself. But alone it does not end the scandal by proving the IOC is purging itself of corruption. Nor does it restore the credibility the Olympic movement requires.The Justice Department is investigating reported bribery in the selection of Salt Lake City for the 2002 Winter Games. Bills before the U.S. Senate would strip tax exemption from Olympic activities.In fairness, the IOC promises to do more, including cooperate with a U.S. Senate investigation and create an outside ethics commission and a commission to plan structural reform.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | March 18, 1999
LAUSANNE, Switzerland -- The International Olympic Committee began its radical makeover with an unprecedented purge yesterday, expelling six members who took improper payoffs from the Salt Lake City bidders for the 2002 Winter Games.The expulsions came on the heels of an 86-2 vote of confidence for the embattled IOC president, Juan Antonio Samaranch, who has weathered months of calls for his resignation.The IOC has been under pressure from corporate sponsors and political leaders to right itself in the aftermath of the Salt Lake scandal, in which organizers were found to have plied IOC members with $1.2 million worth of gifts, cash, travel, scholarships, medical care and other inducements.
SPORTS
September 5, 1997
BaseballAthletics: Optioned P Dane Johnson to Triple-A Edmonton. Recalled P Jay Witasick (C. Milton Wright and UMBC) from Edmonton.Yankees: Recalled P Danny Rios from Triple-A Columbus.BasketballMavericks: Signed G Hubert Davis to six-year contract.Jazz: Signed G Nate Erdmann.76ers: Signed F Terry Cummings to two-year contract.CollegePepperdine: Announced retirement of Wayne Wright, athletic director, effective Dec. 31.Rhode Island: Announced men's basketball junior F Ed Brown has transferred from St. John's.
NEWS
March 4, 1999
THE International Olympic Committee will meet March 17 to consider bribery allegations against 13 of its members. This is in addition to the 9 who have resigned or been expelled and more who have been named in connection to Salt Lake City playing host to the 2002 Winter Games. To date, some 30 of 115 former IOC members are under a cloud involving bribes and extortion in the award of bids to Olympic cities.The Olympic movement is no better than the integrity of its competitions. Quite obviously, that extends to the self-perpetuating IOC itself.
NEWS
December 20, 1999
THE International Olympic Committee passed all the reforms that anyone could expect, and asks to be forgiven all sins.Not so fast.The verdict should be: So far, so good.Credibility requires probationary approval followed by a hard look at implementation.The sins are several: Corruption, soliciting pay-offs for awarding games to cities bidding to host them. Arrogance, conducting affairs in secret as a private club that is nobody else's business. Indifference, both to world opinion and to scientific advances on the doping front.
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