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By Stephen Manes and Stephen Manes,New York Times News Service | March 3, 1997
A YELLOW disk on the screen is the virtual ball. A green line serves as a virtual slingshot. But when you wrap your fingers around a new kind of joystick and pick up the "ball" with the "slingshot," this simple descendant of the game of Pong literally comes alive in your hand.As the ball drops back into the slingshot, your hand feels the ball's "mass" stretching the "rubber." Hold down a button on the joystick, and the ball sticks to the slingshot, lurching to and fro in a genuinely palpable way. Let go, and as the ball takes off, you feel the reaction.
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FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2013
On a breezy, sunny day, the waters of the Chesapeake Bay are a beautiful, wild place. White-capped waves hide the teeming life below the surface as shifting winds keep boaters on their toes. Sailboats keel over with each gust of wind, and powerboats bounce through waves. From the wheel of a world-class boat - like Bob and Phyllis Comeau's Sabre 456 - that view of the bay is even better. Three years ago, when the Bethesda couple were ready to purchase a new boat, they teamed with Sabre Yachts, Annapolis Yacht Sales and the naval architect Jim Taylor to design a vessel that would sail beautifully, feel luxurious and be easy for just two people to operate.
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FEATURES
By ALBANY TIMES UNION | March 10, 2000
ALBANY, N.Y. -- Nintendo boasts that its video game controller will "take a licking and keep on ticking," but the hands of the children using it have been left blistered and bleeding, according to the New York attorney general. In a case surrounding "Mario Party," Nintendo of America Inc. agreed to ship protective gloves to any of the estimated 1.15 million households in the United States that bought the game, Attorney General Eliot Spitzer said in announcing an out-of-court settlement with the manufacturer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | August 20, 2009
Some guys play video games. Some play rock music. Tyler Merchant and his buds do both and see the two as inseparable. "They're kind of indistinguishable from one another, really," says Merchant, 26, who plays bass for Entertainment System, one of 10 bands that will be playing at Saturday's 64 Bit Gen Gamer Fest, featuring groups whose music is taken directly or derived from video games. "It's a celebration of the [gaming] culture in general, with an emphasis on the music." Sitting around a table at Fells Point restaurant Meli on a recent afternoon, the organizers of this year's fest, set for 5 p.m. Saturday at the Ottobar, sound passionate about two things.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2001
In the early days of PC gaming, flying a virtual airplane meant punching the keys on your number pad to move your fighter up, down and sideways. So it followed that after six months of violent maneuvering in Microsoft's Flight Simulator in the late 1980s, my first computer gave up the ghost. I'd learned my lesson: get a joystick. A decade of technological improvement - driven by thousands of games - has turned the simple joystick I bought into an electronic art form. With programmable buttons, throttle controls and add-on rudder pedals, today's joysticks are complex enough to make a real jet jockey jealous.
NEWS
October 23, 1996
Police LogHarwood: Someone kicked open the kitchen door of a house in the 3800 block of Old Birdsville Road between 8: 30 a.m. and 5: 30 p.m. Saturday, ransacked the house and stole a television, videocassette recorder, computer, printer, monitor and joystick, together worth $4,780.Pub Date: 10/23/96
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2000
Joystick system offers realistic feel for flight simulators In piloting your flight simulator games on the PC, it would be difficult to find a better product than the X36 Flight Control System. Saitek's $99.95 package comes in two parts, a joystick and a throttle/rudder controller. The joystick is the primary steering device. It also has a safety switch that can be flipped down for launching missiles. The other device is for precise speed control and operating the plane's rudder. Taken together, the joystick and throttle/rudder controller are among the best available, although becoming comfortable with them might take awhile for novices.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | February 15, 1999
Fast-paced and engaging, LucasArts' Star Wars: Rogue Squadron 3D is a spiffy, arcade-style flight game for Star Wars aficionados who don't have time to master sophisticated flight simulators.In fact, the hardest part of this game may be getting it up and running. More on that later.Set in the period between the original ``Star Wars'' film and ``The Empire Strikes Back,'' Rogue Squadron plops you into Luke Skywalker's seat as you pilot the various craft he made famous in George Lucas' films.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gareth Branwyn | June 28, 1999
Adjustable joystick offers versatility, comfort for gamersSaitek's futuristic-looking Cyborg Stick 2000 joystick ($29.99) is a pleasure to use. Designed with comfort and versatility in mind, the 2000 works well for either left-handed or right-handed gamers. It allows you to adjust for hand size, thumb angle, thumb length, and throttle placement (left or right side).The Cyborg Stick 2000 has four analog buttons (three fire buttons and a trigger), a throttle, and a four-way hat switch. The only drawback to the Stick is that you must rely on your software to assign functions to the buttons.
FEATURES
By Michael Saunders and Michael Saunders,BOSTON GLOBE | September 28, 1996
Sunday, and for years afterward, thousands of parents will cringe reflexively at a simple declarative sentence uttered by a comical animated man: "It's me, Mario!"Yes, the rotund little plumber is back to step on enemies and collect gold coins, but he's also the standard bearer of a new Nintendo video game system that will likely be one of the most asked-for items this holiday season. Nintendo 64 is a powerful descendant of the Nintendo Entertainment System and SuperNintendo game consoles that lurk under television sets in more than 20 million U.S. households.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2006
I'm not so good with buttons, especially those that control video games. When I play, it's a full-body experience with a lot of arm movement as I try to move my little guy on the screen. The physical activity does nothing to influence the game, but it's good exercise and provides plenty of amusement to my brothers, significant others and anyone else watching. Now, though, there's Nintendo Co.'s Wii console with its motion-sensitive controller: Finally, the arm-flailings of novice gamers aren't mocked.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2001
In the early days of PC gaming, flying a virtual airplane meant punching the keys on your number pad to move your fighter up, down and sideways. So it followed that after six months of violent maneuvering in Microsoft's Flight Simulator in the late 1980s, my first computer gave up the ghost. I'd learned my lesson: get a joystick. A decade of technological improvement - driven by thousands of games - has turned the simple joystick I bought into an electronic art form. With programmable buttons, throttle controls and add-on rudder pedals, today's joysticks are complex enough to make a real jet jockey jealous.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2000
Joystick system offers realistic feel for flight simulators In piloting your flight simulator games on the PC, it would be difficult to find a better product than the X36 Flight Control System. Saitek's $99.95 package comes in two parts, a joystick and a throttle/rudder controller. The joystick is the primary steering device. It also has a safety switch that can be flipped down for launching missiles. The other device is for precise speed control and operating the plane's rudder. Taken together, the joystick and throttle/rudder controller are among the best available, although becoming comfortable with them might take awhile for novices.
FEATURES
By ALBANY TIMES UNION | March 10, 2000
ALBANY, N.Y. -- Nintendo boasts that its video game controller will "take a licking and keep on ticking," but the hands of the children using it have been left blistered and bleeding, according to the New York attorney general. In a case surrounding "Mario Party," Nintendo of America Inc. agreed to ship protective gloves to any of the estimated 1.15 million households in the United States that bought the game, Attorney General Eliot Spitzer said in announcing an out-of-court settlement with the manufacturer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gareth Branwyn | June 28, 1999
Adjustable joystick offers versatility, comfort for gamersSaitek's futuristic-looking Cyborg Stick 2000 joystick ($29.99) is a pleasure to use. Designed with comfort and versatility in mind, the 2000 works well for either left-handed or right-handed gamers. It allows you to adjust for hand size, thumb angle, thumb length, and throttle placement (left or right side).The Cyborg Stick 2000 has four analog buttons (three fire buttons and a trigger), a throttle, and a four-way hat switch. The only drawback to the Stick is that you must rely on your software to assign functions to the buttons.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | February 15, 1999
Fast-paced and engaging, LucasArts' Star Wars: Rogue Squadron 3D is a spiffy, arcade-style flight game for Star Wars aficionados who don't have time to master sophisticated flight simulators.In fact, the hardest part of this game may be getting it up and running. More on that later.Set in the period between the original ``Star Wars'' film and ``The Empire Strikes Back,'' Rogue Squadron plops you into Luke Skywalker's seat as you pilot the various craft he made famous in George Lucas' films.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gareth Branwyn and Gareth Branwyn,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 15, 1999
It sounds too good to be true: a completely outfitted PC for under $500.This has to be a scheme, a toy computer cobbled together with cheap, trailing edge electronics carelessly stuffed into a wafer-thin plastic case. But the much talked-about eMachine is far from a scheme. For $499 you get an impressive little system that can easily and efficiently handle the jobs required by the average PC user.eMachines Inc. is a U.S. company funded by two Korean manufacturers, TriGem Computer and Korean Data Systems.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2006
I'm not so good with buttons, especially those that control video games. When I play, it's a full-body experience with a lot of arm movement as I try to move my little guy on the screen. The physical activity does nothing to influence the game, but it's good exercise and provides plenty of amusement to my brothers, significant others and anyone else watching. Now, though, there's Nintendo Co.'s Wii console with its motion-sensitive controller: Finally, the arm-flailings of novice gamers aren't mocked.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gareth Branwyn and Gareth Branwyn,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 15, 1999
It sounds too good to be true: a completely outfitted PC for under $500.This has to be a scheme, a toy computer cobbled together with cheap, trailing edge electronics carelessly stuffed into a wafer-thin plastic case. But the much talked-about eMachine is far from a scheme. For $499 you get an impressive little system that can easily and efficiently handle the jobs required by the average PC user.eMachines Inc. is a U.S. company funded by two Korean manufacturers, TriGem Computer and Korean Data Systems.
BUSINESS
By Stephen Manes and Stephen Manes,New York Times News Service | March 3, 1997
A YELLOW disk on the screen is the virtual ball. A green line serves as a virtual slingshot. But when you wrap your fingers around a new kind of joystick and pick up the "ball" with the "slingshot," this simple descendant of the game of Pong literally comes alive in your hand.As the ball drops back into the slingshot, your hand feels the ball's "mass" stretching the "rubber." Hold down a button on the joystick, and the ball sticks to the slingshot, lurching to and fro in a genuinely palpable way. Let go, and as the ball takes off, you feel the reaction.
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