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Joyce Scott

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By Mary Corey | February 3, 1991
Squeeze this!" demands Joyce Scott as she grabs a meaty hunk of her inner thigh and dangles it near your face."Go on, take a squeeze," she coaxes. "Lemme find you a soft place."
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By Donna M. Owens, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2010
It's a crisp fall afternoon, and Robbye and Kevin Apperson are savoring a quiet Sunday in the parlor of their Reservoir Hill home. Dappled sunlight streams through shuttered windows, softly illuminating ocher-colored walls and a white marble fireplace. Gold and crystal chandeliers shimmer from 12-foot ceilings. The original hardwood floors are buffed to a gentle sheen. "There's something magical about our home," says Robbye Apperson, smiling at her husband of 26 years, who nods in agreement.
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By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff | January 16, 2000
It is a wintry afternoon and everything inside the old barn seems saturated in silky gray light. The space is large, furnished with the massive equipment needed for metal work: heavy benches, vises, tools that resemble instruments of torture, piles of long steel beams. The owner of the barn, sculptor David Hess, his eyes shielded by a steel-worker's mask, stands in front of a larger-than-life metal figure of a woman. He grips a blow torch in full flame, trying to heat the metal, to bend and shape it. But he can't.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | March 14, 2007
Joyce Scott, whose trademark beaded sculptures often address painful issues of race, class and gender served up with a dollop of wry wit, is known for the uninhibited inventiveness of her art. Her new show at Goya Contemporary extends her beadwork ideas into the glass medium, marking a significant evolution in this prolific artist's career. Scott recently spent time at the Pilchuck Glass School in Tacoma, Wash., founded by celebrated glass artist Dale Chihuly. Working with master glassmakers, Scott created an entirely new body of work in blown, lampworked, painted and pressed glass that exploits the whimsical, fanciful qualities of the medium while challenging traditional distinctions between art and craft.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | October 18, 1991
One of the works in Joyce Scott's current show at Washington's Corcoran Gallery is called "No Mommy Me, II." A black woman, made of beads and leather, holds up a picture of a white baby, all plump and pampered looking, while behind the two a black child, presumably the womans own, sits on the floor unattended.The point is that she isn't being a Mommy to her own child, she's being a Mammy to the white baby and that involves neglecting her motherly duties. One may ask what's responsible for this person being a Mammy, and there's no one answer to that: her poverty, her history, her color, the white child's parents and their history and their color and their affluence, and in a sense the white child itself.
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By Sloane Brown | January 2, 2000
Jan. 6: Harford County WalkAmerica 2000 Executive Dinner. Benefits Central Maryland Chapter for the March of Dimes. Cocktails, dinner, speakers including Harford County Executive Jim Harkins. Maryland Golf and Country Club, 1335 E. MacPhail Road, Bel Air. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tickets $50. Call by Jan. 4, 410-638-8019. Jan. 8: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Scholarship Breakfast. Proceeds go to a scholarship program sponsored by Howard L. Cornish Metropolitan Baltimore Chapter of Morgan State University Alumni Association.
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By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | October 11, 1992
Age (73) is no barrier to mastery for Joe AmrheinJoe Amrhein gets a real kick out of his favorite pastime.Perhaps all karate instructors do, but how many are teaching the martial arts at age 73?"
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By Donna M. Owens, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2010
It's a crisp fall afternoon, and Robbye and Kevin Apperson are savoring a quiet Sunday in the parlor of their Reservoir Hill home. Dappled sunlight streams through shuttered windows, softly illuminating ocher-colored walls and a white marble fireplace. Gold and crystal chandeliers shimmer from 12-foot ceilings. The original hardwood floors are buffed to a gentle sheen. "There's something magical about our home," says Robbye Apperson, smiling at her husband of 26 years, who nods in agreement.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | August 17, 1997
In 1991, the Contemporary Museum had put on just one exhibit and was planning its second, a show of photography from the Soviet Union. It was to be installed in the deserted shell of a former Greyhound bus garage, which meant that, among much else, chief curator Lisa Graziose Corrin had to get movable walls on which to hang the art.The walls the show needed weren't made in Baltimore, where Corrin could have counted on community spirit and maybe an entree...
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By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2000
The Joyce J. Scott retrospective exhibit at the Baltimore Museum of Art is one sculpture short today after a clear glass figure of a woman was accidentally broken Thursday morning. The piece, "Clear and Present," shattered on the carpeted floor when a handicapped Northwestern Senior High School boy in a motorized wheelchair tried to turn and accidentally struck the pedestal on which the small sculpture was standing, says museum spokeswoman Mary Patton. The teen-age student, who was visiting with a group of Northwestern special education students, clearly did not intend to damage the sculpture, Patton says.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | January 22, 2005
The moment you step into Baltimore artist Joyce Scott's living room you know you've arrived someplace special. The place is chockablock with artworks: There are African masks, Mexican paper cuttings, Haitian flags and South American yarn paintings festooning the walls in exotic shapes and colors. On the floor sit beaded sculptures from Africa and an elaborately carved walking cane from Panama; on the mantelpiece, more sculpture and a stately Ndebele doll, one of dozens Scott has collected, from South Africa.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | January 4, 2005
The fantastic wire-and-bead sculptures of Joyce Scott, on view at Goya Contemporary (aka Goya Girl Press), are miniature dissertations on politics and society, served up with an utterly outrageous sense of humor. Invariably, it's the humor that people respond to first, if for no other reason than that most of Scott's topics are almost too painful to contemplate without the therapeutic agency of laughter. What, after all, can one say about race, class and gender in America that doesn't sound like either the proverbial "litany of complaint" the country seems so eager to avoid, or the smug rationalizations of a nation in denial?
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2000
The Joyce J. Scott retrospective exhibit at the Baltimore Museum of Art is one sculpture short today after a clear glass figure of a woman was accidentally broken Thursday morning. The piece, "Clear and Present," shattered on the carpeted floor when a handicapped Northwestern Senior High School boy in a motorized wheelchair tried to turn and accidentally struck the pedestal on which the small sculpture was standing, says museum spokeswoman Mary Patton. The teen-age student, who was visiting with a group of Northwestern special education students, clearly did not intend to damage the sculpture, Patton says.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | March 7, 2000
Goya Girl Press is a Baltimore gem that surely deserves wider recognition and appreciation. Started in 1996 by artist Martha Macks, the press' studio at Mill Centre in Hampden provides workshop space, equipment and the services of two master printers who collaborate with artists to create works in a variety of printmaking media, including etching, lithography, screen printing and monotype. The press also operates a gallery for works by local and nationally recognized artists and a publishing business that distributes prints by selected artists.
NEWS
January 24, 2000
THE INSTITUTIONAL impact of the exhibit of Joyce J. Scott's work at the Baltimore Museum of Art is not on view. Yet it's significant that this large show and sumptuous catalog are jointly produced by the museum and the Maryland Institute, College of Art. A few years ago, the BMA and MICA together spelled only trouble. They were at each other's throats over the right of one to sell art stored in the other. Fortunately, that was resolved with generous state intervention. That set the stage for unprecedented coopertion spearheaded by museum Director Doreen Bolger and art school President Fred Lazarus IV. Such synergy between art school and museum strengthens Baltimore as an art center.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | January 23, 2000
One of the seminal influences on contemporary art has been feminism, which has transformed the very definitions of the terms "art" and "artist" in the postmodern era. That influence, and the enormous changes it has wrought over the last 30 years, is everywhere evident in the art of Joyce J. Scott, the Baltimore-based fabric artist, sculptor, painter, jewelry maker and performance artist who is the subject of a landmark retrospective that opens today at...
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | March 14, 2007
Joyce Scott, whose trademark beaded sculptures often address painful issues of race, class and gender served up with a dollop of wry wit, is known for the uninhibited inventiveness of her art. Her new show at Goya Contemporary extends her beadwork ideas into the glass medium, marking a significant evolution in this prolific artist's career. Scott recently spent time at the Pilchuck Glass School in Tacoma, Wash., founded by celebrated glass artist Dale Chihuly. Working with master glassmakers, Scott created an entirely new body of work in blown, lampworked, painted and pressed glass that exploits the whimsical, fanciful qualities of the medium while challenging traditional distinctions between art and craft.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | January 4, 2005
The fantastic wire-and-bead sculptures of Joyce Scott, on view at Goya Contemporary (aka Goya Girl Press), are miniature dissertations on politics and society, served up with an utterly outrageous sense of humor. Invariably, it's the humor that people respond to first, if for no other reason than that most of Scott's topics are almost too painful to contemplate without the therapeutic agency of laughter. What, after all, can one say about race, class and gender in America that doesn't sound like either the proverbial "litany of complaint" the country seems so eager to avoid, or the smug rationalizations of a nation in denial?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff | January 16, 2000
It is a wintry afternoon and everything inside the old barn seems saturated in silky gray light. The space is large, furnished with the massive equipment needed for metal work: heavy benches, vises, tools that resemble instruments of torture, piles of long steel beams. The owner of the barn, sculptor David Hess, his eyes shielded by a steel-worker's mask, stands in front of a larger-than-life metal figure of a woman. He grips a blow torch in full flame, trying to heat the metal, to bend and shape it. But he can't.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | January 2, 2000
Jan. 6: Harford County WalkAmerica 2000 Executive Dinner. Benefits Central Maryland Chapter for the March of Dimes. Cocktails, dinner, speakers including Harford County Executive Jim Harkins. Maryland Golf and Country Club, 1335 E. MacPhail Road, Bel Air. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tickets $50. Call by Jan. 4, 410-638-8019. Jan. 8: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Scholarship Breakfast. Proceeds go to a scholarship program sponsored by Howard L. Cornish Metropolitan Baltimore Chapter of Morgan State University Alumni Association.
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