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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 12, 2001
The most impressive thing about "Blonde," CBS' miniseries on the life of Marilyn Monroe, is how completely it desexualizes one of the most widely known sex symbols of the past century. For the producers, it wasn't that difficult; all they had to do was stay relatively true to the book of the same title by Joyce Carol Oates on which the film is based. But still, for a May "sweeps" miniseries, this is a surprisingly smart film. I say that in praise, but even if you're willing to invest four hours starting tomorrow night, you shouldn't read it as a glowing endorsement.
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NEWS
December 17, 2006
Truth or Consequences By Alison Lurie Pulitzer Prize-winning author Alison Lurie dishes up a surprising satire about two couples making mischief on a college campus. "One can read Lurie as one might read Jane Austen, with continual delight," Joyce Carol Oates has said. In this novel, Lurie returns to the setting that has delighted her fans throughout her long career - the university campus.
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NEWS
December 17, 2006
Truth or Consequences By Alison Lurie Pulitzer Prize-winning author Alison Lurie dishes up a surprising satire about two couples making mischief on a college campus. "One can read Lurie as one might read Jane Austen, with continual delight," Joyce Carol Oates has said. In this novel, Lurie returns to the setting that has delighted her fans throughout her long career - the university campus.
NEWS
December 11, 2005
Fiction Scorpion's Gate By Richard A. Clarke Typhoon Lover By Sujata Massey Missing Mom By Joyce Carol Oates Third Girl from the Left By Martha Southgate Everyone Worth Knowing By Lauren Weisberger Nonfiction Lennon Revealed By Larry Kane Cat People By Michael Korda and Margaret Korda 1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus By Charles Mann I Can't Believe She Did That: Why Women Betray Other Women At Work By Nan Mooney ...
NEWS
December 11, 2005
Fiction Scorpion's Gate By Richard A. Clarke Typhoon Lover By Sujata Massey Missing Mom By Joyce Carol Oates Third Girl from the Left By Martha Southgate Everyone Worth Knowing By Lauren Weisberger Nonfiction Lennon Revealed By Larry Kane Cat People By Michael Korda and Margaret Korda 1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus By Charles Mann I Can't Believe She Did That: Why Women Betray Other Women At Work By Nan Mooney ...
NEWS
By Michael Boylan | June 21, 1992
BLACK WATER.Joyce Carol Oates.William Abrahams/Dutton.153 pages. $17. Chappaquiddick. At first glance it might seem like a great idea. An incident that has riveted the nation. Why not update it for today? Like a Greek tragedy, entirely adaptable.At second glance, the task is not so easy. How does one maintain suspense? The beginning is easy: "The rented Toyota, driven with such impatient exuberance by The Senator, was speeding along the unpaved unnamed road, taking the turns in giddy skidding slides, and then, with no warning, somehow the car had gone off the road and had overturned in black rushing water, listing to its passenger's side, rapidly sinking.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL BOYLAN | December 30, 1990
I Lock My Door Upon Myself. Joyce Carol Oates. Ecco. 98 pages. $15.95. A black man. A white woman. Together in a rowboat going downstream, oblivious to the world. Don't they know they're heading for disaster? Don't they know about the rapids and the waterfall? People don't survive such things. And yet the black man eases up and "lifts the oars and rests them calmly in place as the woman sits continuing to watch him closely, possibly smiling, are the two of them smiling? -- talking together?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Melvin Jules Bukiet and By Melvin Jules Bukiet,Special to the Sun | June 20, 1999
"Broke Heart Blues," by Joyce Carol Oates. Dutton. 369 pages. $24.95I hated high school, and everyone I know hated high school, and I wouldn't trust anyone who didn't hate high school. But for some people high school is "the best time of their lives" and for the characters in Joyce Carol Oates' new book, "Broke Heart Blues," it seems the only time in their lives that matters.Starting in the 1960s and spanning decades, "Broke Heart Blues" is a group portrait of jocks, nerds, cheerleaders, greasers and prom queens in a wealthy suburb of Buffalo, N.Y. For the most part, their adolescent dramas might have been minor, even to the protagonists, if not for a young man named John Reddy Hear.
NEWS
By Josephine Trueschler | June 3, 1991
JOYCE Carol Oates says she has writer's block. This is a stunning statement from a prolific, young writer (only 52) who has already written her masterpiece. She has also written some 20 other novels, who knows how many poems, several collections of short stories and essays, a book on boxing and a few suspense novels.Oates says she has placed three recent manuscripts in the hands of publishers. These brand new books will be released on time -- in August, the fall, and next February. Does that sound like writer's block?
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Book Editor | April 3, 1991
Ever since she was a student at Syracuse University in the late '50s and won a short-story contest held by Mademoiselle magazine, Joyce Carol Oates has been thought of as the literary equivalent of baseball's "The Natural" -- one for whom writing came easily, and often. You thought of her, and the image came forth of millions of words flowing unchecked from the typewriter of this serious-looking woman.At 52, she has written 20 novels, three suspense novels under jTC the pseudonym Rosamond Smith, several collections of short stories, essays and poems, and even some screenplays and plays.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 12, 2001
The most impressive thing about "Blonde," CBS' miniseries on the life of Marilyn Monroe, is how completely it desexualizes one of the most widely known sex symbols of the past century. For the producers, it wasn't that difficult; all they had to do was stay relatively true to the book of the same title by Joyce Carol Oates on which the film is based. But still, for a May "sweeps" miniseries, this is a surprisingly smart film. I say that in praise, but even if you're willing to invest four hours starting tomorrow night, you shouldn't read it as a glowing endorsement.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2000
Maryland poet Lucille Clifton is among 20 finalists for the National Book Awards, it was announced yesterday. "I just found out yesterday," Clifton said from her home in Columbia. "It is an honor. It's one of the most prestigious literary awards in the country." Clifton was nominated for her book, "Blessing the Boats: New and Selected Poems 1988-2000" (BOA Editions, Ltd.) "It's my 30th or 31st book, which includes 10 books of poetry," she said. The book by the former poet laureate of Maryland was among 835 titles considered for awards by the National Book Foundation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | July 9, 2000
Last March, Joyce Carol Oates and Ed Herendeen spent a day in Princeton, N.J., with Marilyn Monroe. To be exact, they spent the day immersed in Oates' new play about Monroe, "Miss Golden Dreams," which is making its world premiere, under Herendeen's direction, at the Contemporary American Theater Festival in Shepherdstown, W.Va., this weekend. West Virginia might seem an unlikely spot for Oates, a former National Book Award winner, to premiere a play. But the writer has a longstanding relationship with the 10-year-old festival, which has produced two of her previous plays and named her honorary chair of its project for commissioning new works.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Melvin Jules Bukiet and By Melvin Jules Bukiet,Special to the Sun | June 20, 1999
"Broke Heart Blues," by Joyce Carol Oates. Dutton. 369 pages. $24.95I hated high school, and everyone I know hated high school, and I wouldn't trust anyone who didn't hate high school. But for some people high school is "the best time of their lives" and for the characters in Joyce Carol Oates' new book, "Broke Heart Blues," it seems the only time in their lives that matters.Starting in the 1960s and spanning decades, "Broke Heart Blues" is a group portrait of jocks, nerds, cheerleaders, greasers and prom queens in a wealthy suburb of Buffalo, N.Y. For the most part, their adolescent dramas might have been minor, even to the protagonists, if not for a young man named John Reddy Hear.
NEWS
By W. G. Regier and W. G. Regier,Special to the Sun | February 4, 1996
What comes from Detroit, is mass produced in a variety of styles, and can go long distances on a little gas? The fiction of Joyce Carol Oates.Poet, playwright, professor, novelist, critic, reviewer and indefatigable short story writer, Ms. Oates has made productivity her most conspicuous characteristic: more than 90 books published so far, and counting. Nothing stops her fiction factory, though many sniff at its emissions. Is Ms. Oates the American answer to imports like Chekhov and Joyce?
NEWS
By Michael Boylan | June 21, 1992
BLACK WATER.Joyce Carol Oates.William Abrahams/Dutton.153 pages. $17. Chappaquiddick. At first glance it might seem like a great idea. An incident that has riveted the nation. Why not update it for today? Like a Greek tragedy, entirely adaptable.At second glance, the task is not so easy. How does one maintain suspense? The beginning is easy: "The rented Toyota, driven with such impatient exuberance by The Senator, was speeding along the unpaved unnamed road, taking the turns in giddy skidding slides, and then, with no warning, somehow the car had gone off the road and had overturned in black rushing water, listing to its passenger's side, rapidly sinking.
NEWS
By W. G. Regier and W. G. Regier,Special to the Sun | February 4, 1996
What comes from Detroit, is mass produced in a variety of styles, and can go long distances on a little gas? The fiction of Joyce Carol Oates.Poet, playwright, professor, novelist, critic, reviewer and indefatigable short story writer, Ms. Oates has made productivity her most conspicuous characteristic: more than 90 books published so far, and counting. Nothing stops her fiction factory, though many sniff at its emissions. Is Ms. Oates the American answer to imports like Chekhov and Joyce?
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2000
Maryland poet Lucille Clifton is among 20 finalists for the National Book Awards, it was announced yesterday. "I just found out yesterday," Clifton said from her home in Columbia. "It is an honor. It's one of the most prestigious literary awards in the country." Clifton was nominated for her book, "Blessing the Boats: New and Selected Poems 1988-2000" (BOA Editions, Ltd.) "It's my 30th or 31st book, which includes 10 books of poetry," she said. The book by the former poet laureate of Maryland was among 835 titles considered for awards by the National Book Foundation.
NEWS
By Josephine Trueschler | June 3, 1991
JOYCE Carol Oates says she has writer's block. This is a stunning statement from a prolific, young writer (only 52) who has already written her masterpiece. She has also written some 20 other novels, who knows how many poems, several collections of short stories and essays, a book on boxing and a few suspense novels.Oates says she has placed three recent manuscripts in the hands of publishers. These brand new books will be released on time -- in August, the fall, and next February. Does that sound like writer's block?
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Book Editor | April 3, 1991
Ever since she was a student at Syracuse University in the late '50s and won a short-story contest held by Mademoiselle magazine, Joyce Carol Oates has been thought of as the literary equivalent of baseball's "The Natural" -- one for whom writing came easily, and often. You thought of her, and the image came forth of millions of words flowing unchecked from the typewriter of this serious-looking woman.At 52, she has written 20 novels, three suspense novels under jTC the pseudonym Rosamond Smith, several collections of short stories, essays and poems, and even some screenplays and plays.
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