Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJournalism School
IN THE NEWS

Journalism School

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
March 20, 2012
Chris Korman is a content editor for The Baltimore Sun and has overseen, at various times, the newspaper's Ravens coverage, its Sunday sports section, its sports enterprise reporting and the horse racing coverage. A graduate of Penn State and the journalism school at Columbia, he previously covered Indiana basketball for  The Herald-Times (Bloomington, Ind.) and began his career as a staff writer at The Patriot-News in Harrisburg, Pa.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
Allow me to roll the apple of discord into the assembly.  For the purposes of discussion, is it to our advantage as journalists to write in a language that we do not share with readers? (If you were not aware that we do this, pray read on.)  Every trade has its jargon and conventions, and practitioners prove themselves adept by mastering it. Journalism is not an exception. We write with conventions that are peculiar to newspapers, and many of them survive in online journalism.  For example, though we no longer refer to legislators as solons , we continue to use such headlinese as  eye  (v.)
Advertisement
NEWS
September 9, 2010
You wrote of Sen. George W. Della of the 46th District: "By and large, he votes the way people in his district would want, he is independent of the leadership in Annapolis, he is accessible to his constituents and he has experience in the ways of the Senate. " ("For Bill Ferguson," Sept. 9) You then add that it would take Senator Della's opponent "a long time to match" his proven record but that the young man has "potential. " Query: Would The Sun drop H.L. Mencken for an upstart just out of journalism school?
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2014
A former Baltimore Sun editor has been named president of the Poynter Institute, a journalism school and media strategy center with students around the world. Timothy A. Franklin, 53, who served as editor and senior vice president of the Sun between 2004 and 2008, is currently the managing editor of Bloomberg News in Washington, where he helped direct news coverage by the Washington bureau's 200 journalists. Between his time at the Sun and Bloomberg, Franklin also helped create the Sports Journalism Center at Indiana University.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2012
The journalism school at the University of North Carolina has dropped the spelling portion from its spelling-and-grammar test, replacing it with a word-usage section, and the howls are rising the journalism-isn't-what-it used-to-be crowd.  You don't have to pass a spelling test! Nobody makes you count headlines by hand any more! Kids these days can't size a photo with a proportion wheel! Nobody can write legibly on hairy parchment today! &c. &c.  For the record, you can go to JimRomenesko.com for a perfectly reasonable explanation of the change from Chris Roush of the journalism school.  Some reflections: Decades of experience with professional journalists whose attention to spelling is, to be charitable, casual suggest that the spelling tests of yore had little enduring effect.  Today, any writer who does not make use of electronic spell-checking to detect misspellings, typos, and inconsistencies in proper names is a fool.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2014
A former Baltimore Sun editor has been named president of the Poynter Institute, a journalism school and media strategy center with students around the world. Timothy A. Franklin, 53, who served as editor and senior vice president of the Sun between 2004 and 2008, is currently the managing editor of Bloomberg News in Washington, where he helped direct news coverage by the Washington bureau's 200 journalists. Between his time at the Sun and Bloomberg, Franklin also helped create the Sports Journalism Center at Indiana University.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
Allow me to roll the apple of discord into the assembly.  For the purposes of discussion, is it to our advantage as journalists to write in a language that we do not share with readers? (If you were not aware that we do this, pray read on.)  Every trade has its jargon and conventions, and practitioners prove themselves adept by mastering it. Journalism is not an exception. We write with conventions that are peculiar to newspapers, and many of them survive in online journalism.  For example, though we no longer refer to legislators as solons , we continue to use such headlinese as  eye  (v.)
BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker and Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
While questions about the University of Maryland's decision to join the Big Ten seemed to dissipate when school leaders explained the financial benefits of the move, doubts about the process used to reach the conclusion linger. Before entering into serious talks with the Big Ten, Maryland President Wallace D. Loh signed a nondisclosure agreement pledging to keep details out of public view. Such agreements are not uncommon when schools' negotiations with conferences involve sensitive financial information.
NEWS
By Alia Malik and Alia Malik,Special to The Sun | January 6, 2008
Thomas Kunkel, dean of the Philip Merrill College of Journalism at the University of Maryland, might be one of the few experts arguing for increased regulation of broadcast media. There isn't enough broadcast news reporting across the nation, he says, and the Federal Communications Commission could fix the problem. Until it began a course of deregulation nearly three decades ago, the FCC required a commitment to local news coverage as a condition of license renewal. That policy should be reinstated, Kunkel argued in a Dec. 22 New York Times op-ed article written with directors of six other journalism schools and Harvard's Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2001
COLLEGE PARK - A heated internal dispute over the finances and future of the University of Maryland campus newspaper, The Diamondback, erupted yesterday into a war of words between the paper and the leadership of the UM Journalism School, played out on The Diamondback's front page. In a banner editorial headlined "Intimidation won't quash independence," Jonathan Schuler, the paper's editor, accused the dean and associate dean of the journalism school, Thomas Kunkel and Chris Callahan, of trying to take control of the newspaper, which has been independent since 1971.
BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker and Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
While questions about the University of Maryland's decision to join the Big Ten seemed to dissipate when school leaders explained the financial benefits of the move, doubts about the process used to reach the conclusion linger. Before entering into serious talks with the Big Ten, Maryland President Wallace D. Loh signed a nondisclosure agreement pledging to keep details out of public view. Such agreements are not uncommon when schools' negotiations with conferences involve sensitive financial information.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2012
The journalism school at the University of North Carolina has dropped the spelling portion from its spelling-and-grammar test, replacing it with a word-usage section, and the howls are rising the journalism-isn't-what-it used-to-be crowd.  You don't have to pass a spelling test! Nobody makes you count headlines by hand any more! Kids these days can't size a photo with a proportion wheel! Nobody can write legibly on hairy parchment today! &c. &c.  For the record, you can go to JimRomenesko.com for a perfectly reasonable explanation of the change from Chris Roush of the journalism school.  Some reflections: Decades of experience with professional journalists whose attention to spelling is, to be charitable, casual suggest that the spelling tests of yore had little enduring effect.  Today, any writer who does not make use of electronic spell-checking to detect misspellings, typos, and inconsistencies in proper names is a fool.
SPORTS
March 20, 2012
Chris Korman is a content editor for The Baltimore Sun and has overseen, at various times, the newspaper's Ravens coverage, its Sunday sports section, its sports enterprise reporting and the horse racing coverage. A graduate of Penn State and the journalism school at Columbia, he previously covered Indiana basketball for  The Herald-Times (Bloomington, Ind.) and began his career as a staff writer at The Patriot-News in Harrisburg, Pa.
NEWS
September 9, 2010
You wrote of Sen. George W. Della of the 46th District: "By and large, he votes the way people in his district would want, he is independent of the leadership in Annapolis, he is accessible to his constituents and he has experience in the ways of the Senate. " ("For Bill Ferguson," Sept. 9) You then add that it would take Senator Della's opponent "a long time to match" his proven record but that the young man has "potential. " Query: Would The Sun drop H.L. Mencken for an upstart just out of journalism school?
NEWS
By Alia Malik and Alia Malik,Special to The Sun | January 6, 2008
Thomas Kunkel, dean of the Philip Merrill College of Journalism at the University of Maryland, might be one of the few experts arguing for increased regulation of broadcast media. There isn't enough broadcast news reporting across the nation, he says, and the Federal Communications Commission could fix the problem. Until it began a course of deregulation nearly three decades ago, the FCC required a commitment to local news coverage as a condition of license renewal. That policy should be reinstated, Kunkel argued in a Dec. 22 New York Times op-ed article written with directors of six other journalism schools and Harvard's Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Walter F. Roche Jr. and Alec MacGillis and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2001
State academic and legislative leaders urged yesterday that the board overseeing the University of Maryland, College Park student newspaper address concerns about the paper's financial situation, particularly the six-figure pay package awarded to the paper's general manager. C.D. Mote Jr., president of the University of Maryland, College Park, said the board of Maryland Media Inc., the nonprofit organization that runs The Diamondback, has an obligation to re-examine its way of doing business.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach | September 10, 1995
"What kind of writing do you do?" asked the novelist sitting to my left at a writer's luncheon."I work for a newspaper in Baltimore," he was told."Oh, did you go to journalism school?""Well, yes.""Columbia?" he asked, invoking the name of the most prestigious journalism school in the country."Actually, no," I heard myself telling him. "I'm one of the lucky ones. I am a graduate of the Miss Dennis School of Writing."Unimpressed, the novelist turned away. Clearly it was a credential that did not measure up to his standards.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.