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NEWS
October 1, 2012
Is anyone disturbed by the current trend of journalists reporting on social media, such as Twitter and Facebook, as if their contents were important breaking news? Does The Sun not aspire to be a respected, award-winning purveyor of serious journalism? If so, then please explain the purpose of reporting on one lone individual's tasteless tweet about Torrey Smith. Drawing any attention whatever to this inane tweet led to more reporting on Twitter's apology and Johns Hopkins' statement of disavowal.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
The Baltimore Sun won an Online Journalism Award Saturday for Matthew Hay Brown's 2013 article, " Breaking the Silence ," about American servicemen who were sexually assaulted while serving in the military. Women in uniform are more likely to be sexually assaulted than men. But because there are many more men than women in the military, there are more assaults against men than against women. And when the victim is a man, Brown's reporting showed, a perpetrator is far less likely to be punished.
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NEWS
June 3, 2014
Dan Bongino suggests that newspapers need to change to make money ( "Bongino: Sun's left-wing views show why print media are becoming irrelevant," May 31). He's right, yellow journalism makes money. But he's wrong, yellow journalism is not new. In 1898 William Randolph Hearst, owner of the New York Journal used yellow journalism to get America involved in a war with Spain. In the Spanish-American War, people died and Mr. Hearst made lots of money. Was it worth it? In 2014, the Koch brothers use the tea party and Fox News in the same manner.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | September 14, 2014
Dear Diary: Looks as though our folks must finally come clean on Benghazi. In my defense, the attack on our consulate occurred in the middle of my re-election campaign. Mitt Romney and the Republicans were banging me pretty good about foreign policy failures - particularly our new "leading from behind" strategy in dealing with the world's trouble spots. They seemed to forget I was elected on a platform to bring the boys and girls home, regardless of consequences! To make matters worse, Mr. Romney and his cowboy allies were alleging a retreat in the war on terror … er, our "overseas contingency operations.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2010
Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun's personal finance columnist, was recognized this week as one of the best business columnists in the country by the Society of American Business Editors and Writers. Ambrose was one of three columnists at large U.S. newspapers to win a "Best in Business" award. Ambrose, who joined the Sun in 1999, received the same award in 2008 for columns written in 2007. - Baltimore Sun
NEWS
February 17, 2010
I have a lot of respect for Mike Tidwell, but I was disappointed in his op-ed piece, "The sky really is falling" (Feb. 14). In my opinion, it was a classic piece of Chicken Little journalism. No matter what weather we have -- snow, drought, heat or cold -- virtually anything that is out of the normal is blamed on global warming. Match a single extreme weather event with a single facet of a complex, multifaceted theory, and the conclusion is, "Aha! Proof! The sky is falling!" In fact, the global climate is an extremely complex, interrelated and incompletely understood system, affected by much more than air pollutant emissions from human activities.
NEWS
April 11, 2012
For me, the image of Mike Wallace as an iconoclastic journalist who challenged the status quo was always contradicted by his status as a hugely successful mainstream media personality. It's as if the few times he butted heads and dug into an interviewee were replayed over and over to obscure what he really was - the product and purveyor of predictable media pablum, that gray blob that dominates the news empire. The contrived and formulaic 60 Minutes set-up with guests, which was his signature, always seemed to mock real expose journalism and insult viewers.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | August 11, 2013
Newspapers have become the bullied school kid of American journalism. Meaning that, as a small child will surrender his lunch money to bigger kids and spend the noon hour watching other people eat, so have newspapers wound up in the ignominious position of surrendering our product -- information -- to Internet and cable outlets and watching them reap handsome profits from aggregating and re-reporting it while we furlough employees and cut back home...
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | July 26, 2010
A note to the notably angry, sarcastic American, the "snarlygaster" who, in letters to this columnist or in postings on baltimoresun.com talk forums, expresses glee at the troubles of the U.S. newspaper industry and the hope that the nation's dailies disappear: Be careful what you wish for. You may end up with Andrew Breitbart. In the age of the Internet, I keep hearing these assertions, often delivered with cynical excitement: The mainstream media, with its leftist agenda, has become irrelevant to the mass of people, who get the "real news" from television, particularly Fox, and the blogosphere.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 19, 2010
At the risk of compounding the senior generation's reputation for old fogyness, here's a warning about the latest virus of so-called social networking that is infecting American journalism. The august Library of Congress has decided to spend untold millions on archiving Twitter, that latest open exercise in getting off your chest in print anything that crosses your mind, in 140 characters or less. Announcement of the scheme came the other day in San Francisco in a speech by Twitter's CEO, Evan Williams, in what was oh-so-cutely called its Chirp Conference.
NEWS
June 3, 2014
Dan Bongino suggests that newspapers need to change to make money ( "Bongino: Sun's left-wing views show why print media are becoming irrelevant," May 31). He's right, yellow journalism makes money. But he's wrong, yellow journalism is not new. In 1898 William Randolph Hearst, owner of the New York Journal used yellow journalism to get America involved in a war with Spain. In the Spanish-American War, people died and Mr. Hearst made lots of money. Was it worth it? In 2014, the Koch brothers use the tea party and Fox News in the same manner.
NEWS
By Caroline Little | May 21, 2014
Every day, city hall reporters at local newspapers distill hours of city council meetings into cogent stories that inform readers about how their elected officials are spending their tax dollars. Sports reporters document the successes of the high school team. Investigative reporters dig through thousands of pages of documents to expose government corruption, waste or ineffectiveness. This journalism plays a vital role in local communities and in our nation's democracy. But it also costs money: Newspapers continue to invest more than $5 billion a year in journalism - far more than any other medium in the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
UPDATE, 5/20: Part 2 of this landmark documentary airs tonight at 10 on MPT, and it is not to be missed. From Verizon being ordered to hand over phone records of its customers, to James Clapper, director of national intelligence, lying to Congress about it, this hour of TV will make you think long and hard about what this nation has become under President Obama, thanks to his unwillingness to rein in the out-of-control NSA President Bush...
NEWS
Susan Reimer | May 7, 2014
My husband the sportswriter received an award last week from the American Association of Orthopedic Surgeons for a meticulously reported story on the surgery that repaired Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson's devastating knee injury. Talk about tough judges. I was there to accept it for him because he was covering the Kentucky Derby, where the athletes have twice as many legs and not much chance of recovering from a serious joint injury. My husband writes a lot about sports injuries.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
Allow me to roll the apple of discord into the assembly.  For the purposes of discussion, is it to our advantage as journalists to write in a language that we do not share with readers? (If you were not aware that we do this, pray read on.)  Every trade has its jargon and conventions, and practitioners prove themselves adept by mastering it. Journalism is not an exception. We write with conventions that are peculiar to newspapers, and many of them survive in online journalism.  For example, though we no longer refer to legislators as solons , we continue to use such headlinese as  eye  (v.)
FEATURES
By Jaclyn Peiser and The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
Men's Journal magazine thinks very highly of Baltimore's Senator Theatre. It is included in its rundown of  the world's top 20 movie theaters.   The Baltimore landmark has been around for 75 years and has hosted film premieres from native sons John Waters and Barry Levinson.   Men's Journal explained that the theater "still maintains much of its history charm (including its original terrazzo floors in the lobby, and it has been cited by many individuals and organizations - including National Trust for Historic Preservation - as the country's quintessential independent theaters.
EXPLORE
January 25, 2012
Editor: A single disgruntled teacher makes a statement at a community meeting in Edgewood and The Aegis prints a "front page, above the fold" article that states "teachers want the Superintendent of schools to be gone. " No surveys, no data, just one person's opinion was enough for The Ageis ' editor to target Dr. Robert Tomback for attack. Basic rules of journalism require that a topic sentence be supported by factual evidence. Yet, the entire article disproved both the misleading headline and the teacher's misplaced attack.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2014
Ralph Dawson Matthews Jr., a former managing editor of the Baltimore Afro-American who worked closely with Malcolm X in the early 1960s and once shared a house with a young Miles Davis, died April 3 at the Adelphi House assisted living facility in Adelphi, Prince George's County. Mr. Dawson died of complications from chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, or COPD. He was 86. "Ralph was always very inquisitive," remembered Harry Peaker, a retired mathematician who grew up with Mr. Matthews in Northwest Baltimore.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2014
Weary as you must be about the back-and-forth about the Associated Press Stylebook 's abandonment of the over/more than  distinction, I have found what may be a locus classicus  of bad argument in favor of the superstition.  At Mahsable, Alex Hazlett and Megan Hess have published a point-counterpoint exchange on the subject , and I want to invite you to look at Ms. Hess's argument in some detail. I do so because her argument illustrates the defective way in which such issues are typically addressed.   Thursday was an emotional day. It began with a gchat from a coworker - “whoa" - and a link to the  Poynter  post relaying the news that the AP had removed its distinction between “more than” and "over.” Four words in, the first flag goes up. The AP Stylebook  makes a minor change in one entry, one that the editors themselves present as being of small consequence, and it is an emotional  issue?
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