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NEWS
By Larry Ty and Larry Ty,THE BOSTON GLOBE | September 26, 2000
BOSTON - The world's most esteemed medical magazine is taking on a decidedly different look, one that almost ensures it will continue to be the center of controversy. The first thing that's changing is the masthead. Gone, or soon to be, are prominent personalities who were part of the storied past at the New England Journal of Medicine, the journal that is cited more often and perhaps revered more widely than any other technical publication in the world. A number of senior editors and board members are being phased out in a move that the new boss says will bring fresh blood but that critics see as a bloodletting aimed at rabble-rousers.
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NEWS
By JULIE BELL and JULIE BELL,SUN REPORTER | January 22, 2006
Five or six times a year when Dr. Richard Smith was editor of the British Medical Journal, he would receive scientific papers that he suspected were fabricated or had other ethical problems. Simply declining to publish them didn't seem like enough to protect the public. So Smith would look for someone, anyone, to investigate - an employer, a government agency in the researcher's country, a fellow journal worried that the scientist ultimately would get a flawed study published elsewhere if it weren't discredited.
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NEWS
May 6, 1997
Julia Zalokar, 70, a prominent epidemiologist, died April 27 in her La Jolla, Calif., home from complications of acute asthma. In 1946, she became one of the first women admitted to Columbia University's medical school. Illness forced her to drop out, but Mrs. Zalokar later continued her education and became a respected epidemiologist, publishing articles in the New England Journal of Medicine, Lancet and Science.Pub Date: 5/06/97
NEWS
By BRUCE JAPSEN and BRUCE JAPSEN,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 9, 2005
CHICAGO -- In an unusual move, The New England Journal of Medicine questioned yesterday the integrity of a key study that Merck & Co. has used to defend its troubled painkiller Vioxx, asking the authors to correct it. In an editorial posted yesterday on its Web site, the Journal said a study funded by Merck concealed heart attacks suffered by three patients, which "made certain calculations and conclusions in the article incorrect." The development could be a potential setback to Merck's defense of future product liability claims in more than 6,000 lawsuits over Vioxx, including 2,900 suits in federal court and 2,750 in New Jersey state court.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | August 20, 1999
BOSTON -- As expected, Dr. Marcia Angell has agreed to serve as interim editor in chief of the New England Journal of Medicine, effective Sept. 1, the Massachusetts Medical Society announced yesterday.Like the previous editor, Dr. Jerome P. Kassirer, Angell will have total control of the content and editorial policies of the New England Journal of Medicine, said the medical society's president, Dr. Jack Eigy.Angell said she also will have total control over the use of the name, logo and content, which she said is "very important."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 10, 2005
Just three weeks after an editorial in a prestigious American medical journal declared an expensive new cancer drug to be revolutionary and a possible cure for some hard-to-treat breast cancers, its conclusions were challenged by a prominent medical journal in Britain. "The available evidence is insufficient to make reliable judgments," wrote the editors of the British journal Lancet in an online editorial dated today. "It is profoundly misleading to suggest, even rhetorically, that the published data may be indicative of a cure for breast cancer."
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2005
The attractions of professional football are apparent to anyone with the ability to reach that level, and for many others who don't. The modern player can count on glory and healthy salaries from his work. That has always made the risks of playing seem worth taking. "For 90 percent, they would say they would do it again," said Kevin Guskiewicz, research director of the Center for the Study of Retired Athletes at the University of North Carolina. "Fame, money. It was important to them, and it outweighs the complications that result later in life."
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1999
Recently, child psychiatrists at the University of Chicago completed a study on a fad treatment for autism. They found that the drug secretin did nothing to help autistic children speak or interact with others, contradicting claims that had been made on a network television show.Dr. Edwin Cook, a well-known psychiatrist involved in the study, knew the results weren't going to make anyone happy. But he thought it was important to get the news out fast, if only to calm the hopes of desperate parents.
NEWS
By BRUCE JAPSEN and BRUCE JAPSEN,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 9, 2005
CHICAGO -- In an unusual move, The New England Journal of Medicine questioned yesterday the integrity of a key study that Merck & Co. has used to defend its troubled painkiller Vioxx, asking the authors to correct it. In an editorial posted yesterday on its Web site, the Journal said a study funded by Merck concealed heart attacks suffered by three patients, which "made certain calculations and conclusions in the article incorrect." The development could be a potential setback to Merck's defense of future product liability claims in more than 6,000 lawsuits over Vioxx, including 2,900 suits in federal court and 2,750 in New Jersey state court.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1999
The American Medical Association is expected today to name Dr. Catherine D. DeAngelis, vice dean at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, as editor of its prestigious medical journal, according to sources knowledgeable about the appointment.DeAngelis, a pediatrician who is known as a staunch advocate for women in medicine, declined to comment last night on reports of her appointment to the top post at the Journal of the American Medical Association. The AMA is planning to make an announcement at an afternoon news conference in New York.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 10, 2005
Just three weeks after an editorial in a prestigious American medical journal declared an expensive new cancer drug to be revolutionary and a possible cure for some hard-to-treat breast cancers, its conclusions were challenged by a prominent medical journal in Britain. "The available evidence is insufficient to make reliable judgments," wrote the editors of the British journal Lancet in an online editorial dated today. "It is profoundly misleading to suggest, even rhetorically, that the published data may be indicative of a cure for breast cancer."
NEWS
May 27, 2005
In Brief Bypass surgery vs. stent Bare-metal stents, used to prop open cleared heart arteries, fail to lengthen survival as much as bypass surgery in patients with multiple diseased blood vessels, according to a study published in yesterday's New England Journal of Medicine Researchers in New York found that patients with more than one clogged cardiac artery were about 25 percent less likely to die when surgeons routed the flow of blood around an...
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2005
The attractions of professional football are apparent to anyone with the ability to reach that level, and for many others who don't. The modern player can count on glory and healthy salaries from his work. That has always made the risks of playing seem worth taking. "For 90 percent, they would say they would do it again," said Kevin Guskiewicz, research director of the Center for the Study of Retired Athletes at the University of North Carolina. "Fame, money. It was important to them, and it outweighs the complications that result later in life."
NEWS
By Larry Ty and Larry Ty,THE BOSTON GLOBE | September 26, 2000
BOSTON - The world's most esteemed medical magazine is taking on a decidedly different look, one that almost ensures it will continue to be the center of controversy. The first thing that's changing is the masthead. Gone, or soon to be, are prominent personalities who were part of the storied past at the New England Journal of Medicine, the journal that is cited more often and perhaps revered more widely than any other technical publication in the world. A number of senior editors and board members are being phased out in a move that the new boss says will bring fresh blood but that critics see as a bloodletting aimed at rabble-rousers.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1999
Recently, child psychiatrists at the University of Chicago completed a study on a fad treatment for autism. They found that the drug secretin did nothing to help autistic children speak or interact with others, contradicting claims that had been made on a network television show.Dr. Edwin Cook, a well-known psychiatrist involved in the study, knew the results weren't going to make anyone happy. But he thought it was important to get the news out fast, if only to calm the hopes of desperate parents.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1999
The American Medical Association is expected today to name Dr. Catherine D. DeAngelis, vice dean at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, as editor of its prestigious medical journal, according to sources knowledgeable about the appointment.DeAngelis, a pediatrician who is known as a staunch advocate for women in medicine, declined to comment last night on reports of her appointment to the top post at the Journal of the American Medical Association. The AMA is planning to make an announcement at an afternoon news conference in New York.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 26, 1997
In the 10 years since she rose to the New England Journal of Medicine's second highest post, Dr. Marcia Angell has won admirers and critics for her uncompromising editorials on issues that are important to the nation's doctors.She opposed laws against physician-assisted suicide and criticized doctors for denying pain-relieving narcotics to dying patients. She endorsed a Canadian-style health care system and took on lawyers and journalists for scaring women about silicone breast implants.Surely nothing, however, has attracted more attention than her Sept.
NEWS
May 27, 2005
In Brief Bypass surgery vs. stent Bare-metal stents, used to prop open cleared heart arteries, fail to lengthen survival as much as bypass surgery in patients with multiple diseased blood vessels, according to a study published in yesterday's New England Journal of Medicine Researchers in New York found that patients with more than one clogged cardiac artery were about 25 percent less likely to die when surgeons routed the flow of blood around an...
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | August 20, 1999
BOSTON -- As expected, Dr. Marcia Angell has agreed to serve as interim editor in chief of the New England Journal of Medicine, effective Sept. 1, the Massachusetts Medical Society announced yesterday.Like the previous editor, Dr. Jerome P. Kassirer, Angell will have total control of the content and editorial policies of the New England Journal of Medicine, said the medical society's president, Dr. Jack Eigy.Angell said she also will have total control over the use of the name, logo and content, which she said is "very important."
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 26, 1997
In the 10 years since she rose to the New England Journal of Medicine's second highest post, Dr. Marcia Angell has won admirers and critics for her uncompromising editorials on issues that are important to the nation's doctors.She opposed laws against physician-assisted suicide and criticized doctors for denying pain-relieving narcotics to dying patients. She endorsed a Canadian-style health care system and took on lawyers and journalists for scaring women about silicone breast implants.Surely nothing, however, has attracted more attention than her Sept.
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