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By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | October 2, 1991
Woodrow W. Johnson says that at age 73 he has led a full life, but he still has one goal: to solve the mystery of his possible descent from Joshua Johnson, the country's first important black portrait artist.Family tradition, circumstantial evidence and "gut feeling" tell the Monkton resident he's right, but documentary proof remains elusive."It's a mystery," said Mr. Johnson, a retired racing stable fore- man.Joshua Johnson worked in Baltimore from the mid-1790s until about 1825. He painted members of prominent families, including many children.
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NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | August 6, 2006
LEROY COMEGYS REMEMBERS GROWING UP IN Baltimore during the 1940s and '50s in a house filled with music and art: his mom's piano playing, his dad listening to jazz recordings, and the paintings and drawings his parents hung on the walls of their home -- among them sketches of black people by American artist Reginald Marsh for his famous painting of New York's Coney Island Beach. Those early experiences, which sparked a lifelong love of art, help explain why Comegys, 62, is so enthusiastic today about sharing his passion with others.
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NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | August 6, 2006
LEROY COMEGYS REMEMBERS GROWING UP IN Baltimore during the 1940s and '50s in a house filled with music and art: his mom's piano playing, his dad listening to jazz recordings, and the paintings and drawings his parents hung on the walls of their home -- among them sketches of black people by American artist Reginald Marsh for his famous painting of New York's Coney Island Beach. Those early experiences, which sparked a lifelong love of art, help explain why Comegys, 62, is so enthusiastic today about sharing his passion with others.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1998
Joshua Johnson, considered by art historians and collectors the first significant black American portrait painter, lived and painted in Baltimore during the late 18th and early 19th centuries.While much of his work has survived and is in major collections, Johnson himself remains somewhat of an enigma. How he spelled his name, or if he was even black, have been open tospeculation.His name appears in city directories between 1795 and 1825, listed as Johnson or Johnston. In the 1816-1817 directory, there is a Joshua Johnson, a painter and "Free Householder of Colour."
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1998
Joshua Johnson, considered by art historians and collectors the first significant black American portrait painter, lived and painted in Baltimore during the late 18th and early 19th centuries.While much of his work has survived and is in major collections, Johnson himself remains somewhat of an enigma. How he spelled his name, or if he was even black, have been open tospeculation.His name appears in city directories between 1795 and 1825, listed as Johnson or Johnston. In the 1816-1817 directory, there is a Joshua Johnson, a painter and "Free Householder of Colour."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2005
Jean and Jim Baker, of College Park, MD and Ronald Wilkins, of Balt., MD, announce the marriage of their daughter Odyssey, to Joshua Johnson, son of Mildred and the late Robert Johnson, of Baltimore, MD, on August 6, 2005. The couple will honeymoon in Aruba.
NEWS
April 22, 2003
On April 19, 2003, BARBARA J. JOHNSON, beloved wife of Robert Johnson; devoted mother of Dan Johnson, Susan Kulakowski and Michael Johnson; dear grandmother of Jessica Lynn Stahl, Jennifer Johnson, Michael Johnson Jr., Joshua Johnson and Charles Kulakowski; great-grandmother of Kaysie Stahl. Barbara was a long time volunteer with the American Cancer Society, Reach to Recovery Program and counseling breast cancer patients. Memorial services will be held Friday, April 25 at 2 P.M., at North Point Baptist Church, 4201 North Point Blvd.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom LoBianco | February 3, 2000
The Maryland Historical Society celebrates African-American History Month with craft activities, a living-history performance and refreshments tonight at 5:30 p.m. at its Monument Street headquarters. Robert Schoeberlein, former MHS curator of prints and photographs, will share insights about the society's extensive African-American collections. Viewers also can take a look at portraits by Joshua Johnson, a Baltimore native and America's first African-American portrait artist, and letters, photos and memorabilia relating to ragtime pianist Eubie Blake, also a Baltimorean.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,nick.madigan@baltsun.com | October 31, 2009
A 30-year-old Pikesville man was accused Friday of firing the shot that killed a liquor store owner during an attempted robbery in July. Robert Napolean Crowder Jr. of the 4600 block of Old Court Road faces charges of first-degree murder and conspiracy in the death of Joon Am Kang, 57, on July 16 at Putty Hill Liquors in Fullerton. Baltimore County police pressed identical charges Friday against another man, Randolph Lee Hughes, 29, whose last known address was in the 1100 block of Cedarcroft Road in the city.
FEATURES
June 6, 1991
The third annual African-American Film Festival opens tonight at 8 at the Baltimore Museum of Art with ''Oreos With Attitude'' and "Touki Bouki.''"Oreos" is the story of black urban professionals who decide to adopt a white child to promote racial harmony. "Touki Bouki" follows the adventures of a young African couple who dream of going to Paris. After the screenings Dr. Mbye Cham, professor of African-American history at Howard University in Washington, D.C., and actress Miriam Niang are to lead a discussion.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | October 2, 1991
Woodrow W. Johnson says that at age 73 he has led a full life, but he still has one goal: to solve the mystery of his possible descent from Joshua Johnson, the country's first important black portrait artist.Family tradition, circumstantial evidence and "gut feeling" tell the Monkton resident he's right, but documentary proof remains elusive."It's a mystery," said Mr. Johnson, a retired racing stable fore- man.Joshua Johnson worked in Baltimore from the mid-1790s until about 1825. He painted members of prominent families, including many children.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 20, 2008
The Bowie State men's basketball team jumped to a big early lead and won its seventh consecutive game, defeating Elizabeth City State, 78-66, last night. David Paris had a game-high 20 points for Bowie State (19-7, 13-5 Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association), which shot 50 percent from the field in the first half to build an 11-point lead. Jason Ingram (16 points), Orlando Wright (15) and Christian Jackson (12) also reached double figures. Joshua Johnson led the Bulldogs with nine rebounds.
NEWS
April 27, 2008
Head Start help to end in Howard After years of providing discounted diesel fuel and repairs for Head Start buses, Howard County officials have told the nonprofit the practice must end, raising fears that increased costs will hamper educational programs for 264 children from low-income households. One day, two violent deaths Police found Nancy Schmidt, 74, about 5:30 a.m. Monday, stabbed repeatedly in her Remington home, and Michael Ellerby, 24, was shot outside of a funeral in West Baltimore about 12:15 p.m. the same day. Dixon to halt property tax cut Blaming a weak economy and shaky revenues, Mayor Sheila Dixon is abandoning a long-standing plan to cut 2 cents this year from Baltimore's highest-in-the-state property tax rate.
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