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By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,Sun Reporter | June 7, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Monte Irvin is 88. James Tillman is 87. They are among a dwindling group of 15 to 20 surviving players who competed with or against Josh Gibson, the preeminent Negro leagues slugger who died 60 years ago. "I gravitate to these people. But these guys are getting older and eventually there are not going to be any left," said Sean Gibson, the slugger's great-grandson. Eager to have his relative's legacy preserved, Gibson, 37, appeared in Washington yesterday to unveil an exhibit featuring the bat, jerseys and photos of the man whose Hall of Fame plaque says he "hit almost 800 home runs in league and independent baseball during his 17-year career."
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By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,Sun Reporter | June 7, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Monte Irvin is 88. James Tillman is 87. They are among a dwindling group of 15 to 20 surviving players who competed with or against Josh Gibson, the preeminent Negro leagues slugger who died 60 years ago. "I gravitate to these people. But these guys are getting older and eventually there are not going to be any left," said Sean Gibson, the slugger's great-grandson. Eager to have his relative's legacy preserved, Gibson, 37, appeared in Washington yesterday to unveil an exhibit featuring the bat, jerseys and photos of the man whose Hall of Fame plaque says he "hit almost 800 home runs in league and independent baseball during his 17-year career."
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By Gregory Clay | July 11, 1999
THE BASEBALL SEASON is in full swing, and as we embrace and salute Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa, two of the greatest single-season home-run hitters in the major leagues, we also must remember that long-forgotten slugger from the Negro Leagues: Josh Gibson.Let's begin this remembrance with Buck O'Neil, the resident raconteur of Negro League baseball history. O'Neil, who played for the Kansas City Monarchs, remembers a poignant incident from 1942. "A guy named Lick Carlisle singled," O'Neil recalled, "then he was thrown out trying to steal second base."
FEATURES
February 4, 2006
2:30 p.m. Major League --See The Soul of the Game, a film that details the competition between Satchel Paige, Josh Gibson and Jackie Robinson to become the first African-American player in baseball's major leagues, at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, 400 Cathedral St. Free. 410-396-5430. 7:30 p.m. Up and Away --Here's the last chance to see resident artist Mara Neimanis' one-woman aerial performance commemorating Amelia Earhart at the Creative Alliance at the Patterson. Neimanis, as Earhart, will be perched atop a 12-foot-tall, rotating plane sculpture, made of steel by fellow resident artist Laura Shults.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Staff Writer | July 14, 1993
The 25 heroes from another baseball era sat in a semicircle of chairs on the stage, relating their biggest thrills.One of them, Monte Irvin, who had the thrill of putting on a New York Giants uniform for the first time in 1949 after years in the Negro Leagues, said, "There's $100 million worth of talent here by today's market."The oldest of the old stars at the Negro Leagues Symposium at the Upper Deck All-Star FanFest at Festival Hall yesterday was Ted "Double Duty" Radcliffe, who turned 91 last Wednesday.
FEATURES
February 4, 2006
2:30 p.m. Major League --See The Soul of the Game, a film that details the competition between Satchel Paige, Josh Gibson and Jackie Robinson to become the first African-American player in baseball's major leagues, at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, 400 Cathedral St. Free. 410-396-5430. 7:30 p.m. Up and Away --Here's the last chance to see resident artist Mara Neimanis' one-woman aerial performance commemorating Amelia Earhart at the Creative Alliance at the Patterson. Neimanis, as Earhart, will be perched atop a 12-foot-tall, rotating plane sculpture, made of steel by fellow resident artist Laura Shults.
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Sun Staff Writer | September 23, 1994
Despite its drawbacks -- most notably a slow pace that drags to a halt when self-important authors speak of the game in reverent tones -- Ken Burns' "Baseball" series, currently playing on PBS, deserves praise for its coverage of the Negro Leagues.Here's hoping that kids who may have been lulled to sleep the first few nights of the series were tuned into the segment on pitcher Satchel Paige and catcher Josh Gibson. Not to be missed is Sunday's installment, which focuses on Jackie Robinson's breaking of the color barrier.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Sun Staff Writer | February 8, 1994
When the lights were dimmed in the sixth-floor banquet room of the B&O warehouse yesterday for the unveiling of a documentary on the Negro Leagues, the middle and high school students seemed far more interested in conversation and their lunch plates.But as the words and pictures unfolded of men who never got the chance to make their mark in the big time, the sandwiches, soft drinks and small talk took a back seat to history.After the 60-minute film -- "Kings on the Hill: Baseball's Forgotten Men," distributed by Major League Baseball in conjunction with Black History Month -- the students began to talk again.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | February 8, 1995
Much has been written -- in his hometown paper and elsewhere -- in commemoration of Babe Ruth's centennial earlier this week, but one tidbit has received little press. In 1931, a 17-year-old woman named Jackie Mitchell struck out both the Babe and Lou Gehrig in an exhibition game between the Chattanooga Lookouts and the New York Yankees.The Playwrights Theatre of Baltimore has cleverly taken advantage of the centennial hoopla by producing the world premiere of a play about Mitchell, "Boys & Girls Together," by Michael Dale.
NEWS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Sun reporter | October 15, 2006
John Pagliaro returned an interception 19 yards for a touchdown, and rushed for 124 yards with a 71-yard touchdown as fourth-ranked Gilman won its third straight game and its 12th consecutive game against Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association A Conference competition by beating winless and host Calvert Hall, 26-7, yesterday. Ben Eaton Jr. scored on a 21-yard run, and Makura Compton returned an interception 100 yards for another touchdown against the Cardinals (0-5, 0-3) as Gilman (3-2, 3-0)
TOPIC
By Gregory Clay | July 11, 1999
THE BASEBALL SEASON is in full swing, and as we embrace and salute Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa, two of the greatest single-season home-run hitters in the major leagues, we also must remember that long-forgotten slugger from the Negro Leagues: Josh Gibson.Let's begin this remembrance with Buck O'Neil, the resident raconteur of Negro League baseball history. O'Neil, who played for the Kansas City Monarchs, remembers a poignant incident from 1942. "A guy named Lick Carlisle singled," O'Neil recalled, "then he was thrown out trying to steal second base."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | February 8, 1995
Much has been written -- in his hometown paper and elsewhere -- in commemoration of Babe Ruth's centennial earlier this week, but one tidbit has received little press. In 1931, a 17-year-old woman named Jackie Mitchell struck out both the Babe and Lou Gehrig in an exhibition game between the Chattanooga Lookouts and the New York Yankees.The Playwrights Theatre of Baltimore has cleverly taken advantage of the centennial hoopla by producing the world premiere of a play about Mitchell, "Boys & Girls Together," by Michael Dale.
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Sun Staff Writer | September 23, 1994
Despite its drawbacks -- most notably a slow pace that drags to a halt when self-important authors speak of the game in reverent tones -- Ken Burns' "Baseball" series, currently playing on PBS, deserves praise for its coverage of the Negro Leagues.Here's hoping that kids who may have been lulled to sleep the first few nights of the series were tuned into the segment on pitcher Satchel Paige and catcher Josh Gibson. Not to be missed is Sunday's installment, which focuses on Jackie Robinson's breaking of the color barrier.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Sun Staff Writer | February 8, 1994
When the lights were dimmed in the sixth-floor banquet room of the B&O warehouse yesterday for the unveiling of a documentary on the Negro Leagues, the middle and high school students seemed far more interested in conversation and their lunch plates.But as the words and pictures unfolded of men who never got the chance to make their mark in the big time, the sandwiches, soft drinks and small talk took a back seat to history.After the 60-minute film -- "Kings on the Hill: Baseball's Forgotten Men," distributed by Major League Baseball in conjunction with Black History Month -- the students began to talk again.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Staff Writer | July 14, 1993
The 25 heroes from another baseball era sat in a semicircle of chairs on the stage, relating their biggest thrills.One of them, Monte Irvin, who had the thrill of putting on a New York Giants uniform for the first time in 1949 after years in the Negro Leagues, said, "There's $100 million worth of talent here by today's market."The oldest of the old stars at the Negro Leagues Symposium at the Upper Deck All-Star FanFest at Festival Hall yesterday was Ted "Double Duty" Radcliffe, who turned 91 last Wednesday.
SPORTS
April 12, 1995
The Negro League Ballplayers Association is sponsoring its first Charity Baseball Card and Autograph Show to benefit association members. It will be held April 22 and 23 at the Carrolltown Center Mall in Eldersburg, on Liberty Road one mile east of Route 32. Hours are 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. April 22 and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. April 23.Members of the Negro League Ball Players Association expected to attend are Monte Irvin, Walter "Buck" Leonard, Max Manning, Stanley...
NEWS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Sun reporter | November 19, 2006
Franklin's Scott Noble said he "played with a chip on my shoulder" in yesterday's 33-13, Class 3A North Region semifinal rout of visiting Towson. Noble rushed for 170 yards and two touchdowns; deflected a pass into the hands of teammate Jeromie Miller to set up his 28-yard interception return for a score; and later raced the remaining 51 yards for a touchdown off a pitch from Rashad Blackwell after the latter's 14-yard reception from Josh Gibson....
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