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Josephine Jacobsen

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July 11, 2003
This poem, written by Josephine Jacobsen who died at age 94 Wednesday, first appeared in The New Yorker Sept. 30, 1998. It is reprinted with permission. The Companions Living close to death is not just a case of breath after breath. It is to realize that to fraternize with the dark prince is possible and wise, so that in the final weather when together you quit the room though tentative and weary you will have the enormous answer to the enormous query.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,Sun reporter | June 8, 2008
The poet Josephine Jacobsen, in an essay she wrote for The Sun almost 30 years ago, decried how hard it was to get inside things that should be easy to open (milk cartons, aspirin bottles), yet how quickly Americans seemed to expect personal intimacy. Friendship, the Baltimore native wrote in her elegant way, should be a matter of "gradation - the stages by which acquaintance becomes congeniality, congeniality becomes intimacy. ... It is the flowering of long preparation." Jacobsen, the celebrated author of nine books of verse who once served as Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress (a position later renamed U.S. Poet Laureate)
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,Sun reporter | June 8, 2008
The poet Josephine Jacobsen, in an essay she wrote for The Sun almost 30 years ago, decried how hard it was to get inside things that should be easy to open (milk cartons, aspirin bottles), yet how quickly Americans seemed to expect personal intimacy. Friendship, the Baltimore native wrote in her elegant way, should be a matter of "gradation - the stages by which acquaintance becomes congeniality, congeniality becomes intimacy. ... It is the flowering of long preparation." Jacobsen, the celebrated author of nine books of verse who once served as Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress (a position later renamed U.S. Poet Laureate)
NEWS
August 16, 2003
Josephine Jacobsen: A memorial Mass will be offered for Josephine Jacobsen at 10 a.m. Sept. 4 at the Marikle Chapel of the Annunciation at the College of Notre Dame of Maryland, 4701 N. Charles St. Mrs. Jacobsen, a short-story writer and highly acclaimed poet whose work frequently was published in the New Yorker, died July 9 at Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. She was 94. The memorial Mass is being held at the college, of which Mrs. Jacobsen was a longtime benefactor, at her request.
FEATURES
By SUN ART CRITIC | November 9, 1997
Josephine Jacobsen has been a published poet for 79 years, since the children's magazine St. Nicholas printed a poem when she was 10 years old. Many years later, in an essay about becoming a poet, she remembered the never-to-be-equaled experience of going down to the newsstand, buying a copy of the magazine and opening it to her first published poem:"I stood on the sidewalk, obstructive, stunned, looking at my words, naked, displayed to the world, and...
FEATURES
By Josephine Jacobsen Pub date: 8/16/98 | August 16, 1998
Poets, as Josephine Jacobsen suggests in her 1980 essay "Artifacts of Memory," are archaeologists. They mine the past and make connections to the present.Recently, she and I spoke about survival - not personal survival, but the survival of one's work. Who might be picking up the"Collected Jacobsen" a few generations from now? With characteristic modesty, she suggested it was extremely unlikely that her work, spanning almost 80 years now, would stand the test of time. I argued, as forcefully as I could, that of course it would.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2003
Josephine Jacobsen, a critically praised lyric poet and short-story writer who had been poetry consultant to the Library of Congress, died late Wednesday of kidney failure at Broadmead Retirement Community in Cockeysville. The former North Baltimore resident was 94. She wrote for more than eight decades, and her poems regularly appeared in The New Yorker, among other publications. But major recognition came to Mrs. Jacobsen relatively late in life. It was not until 1971, when she was 63, that she became consultant in poetry to the Library of Congress, a position now called U.S. poet laureate.
NEWS
August 16, 2003
Josephine Jacobsen: A memorial Mass will be offered for Josephine Jacobsen at 10 a.m. Sept. 4 at the Marikle Chapel of the Annunciation at the College of Notre Dame of Maryland, 4701 N. Charles St. Mrs. Jacobsen, a short-story writer and highly acclaimed poet whose work frequently was published in the New Yorker, died July 9 at Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. She was 94. The memorial Mass is being held at the college, of which Mrs. Jacobsen was a longtime benefactor, at her request.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Spires and Elizabeth Spires,Special to the Sun | July 13, 2003
Editor's note: Baltimore poet and Goucher College professor Elizabeth Spires wrote this tribute to Josephine Jacobsen in The Sun on the occasion of her 90th birthday in 1998. Spires edited The Instant of Knowing (University of Michigan Press, 1997), a collection of Jacobsen's writing. Spires' poem for Jacobsen, "In Heaven It Is Always Autumn," follows. Poets, as Josephine Jacobsen suggests in her 1980 essay "Artifacts of Memory," are archaeologists. They mine the past and make connections to the present.
NEWS
By John Goodspeed | January 4, 1993
MAKE it a New Year's resolution: Support your local poets.By "local" I mean somewhat regional: poets who live in Maryland or the District of Columbia -- for example, Josephine Jacobsen of Baltimore, one of the best poets (and short-story writers) in Maryland history.In her fairly long and quite distinguished career, Ms. Jacobsen has won a fellowship from the Academy of American poets, the prestigious Lenore Marshall poetry award, an award from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters and two terms as poetry consultant at the Library of Congress.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Spires and Elizabeth Spires,Special to the Sun | July 13, 2003
Editor's note: Baltimore poet and Goucher College professor Elizabeth Spires wrote this tribute to Josephine Jacobsen in The Sun on the occasion of her 90th birthday in 1998. Spires edited The Instant of Knowing (University of Michigan Press, 1997), a collection of Jacobsen's writing. Spires' poem for Jacobsen, "In Heaven It Is Always Autumn," follows. Poets, as Josephine Jacobsen suggests in her 1980 essay "Artifacts of Memory," are archaeologists. They mine the past and make connections to the present.
FEATURES
July 11, 2003
This poem, written by Josephine Jacobsen who died at age 94 Wednesday, first appeared in The New Yorker Sept. 30, 1998. It is reprinted with permission. The Companions Living close to death is not just a case of breath after breath. It is to realize that to fraternize with the dark prince is possible and wise, so that in the final weather when together you quit the room though tentative and weary you will have the enormous answer to the enormous query.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2003
Josephine Jacobsen, a critically praised lyric poet and short-story writer who had been poetry consultant to the Library of Congress, died late Wednesday of kidney failure at Broadmead Retirement Community in Cockeysville. The former North Baltimore resident was 94. She wrote for more than eight decades, and her poems regularly appeared in The New Yorker, among other publications. But major recognition came to Mrs. Jacobsen relatively late in life. It was not until 1971, when she was 63, that she became consultant in poetry to the Library of Congress, a position now called U.S. poet laureate.
FEATURES
By Josephine Jacobsen Pub date: 8/16/98 | August 16, 1998
Poets, as Josephine Jacobsen suggests in her 1980 essay "Artifacts of Memory," are archaeologists. They mine the past and make connections to the present.Recently, she and I spoke about survival - not personal survival, but the survival of one's work. Who might be picking up the"Collected Jacobsen" a few generations from now? With characteristic modesty, she suggested it was extremely unlikely that her work, spanning almost 80 years now, would stand the test of time. I argued, as forcefully as I could, that of course it would.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Spires | August 16, 1998
In heaven it is always autumn. The leaves are always nearto falling there but never fall, and pairs of souls out walkingL heaven's paths no longer feel the weight of years upon them.Safe in heaven's calm, they take each other's arm,the light shining through them, all joy and terror gone.But we are far from heaven here, in a garden ragged and unkeptas Eden would be with the walls knocked down, the paths litteredwith the unswept leaves of many years, bright keepsakesL for children of the Fall.
NEWS
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 1, 1998
We as a nation never lack for crises - here a dictator, there an economic crunch. As always, the new generation starts out slighting history. But underneath, that bad feeling called the Vietnam War lingers. To know how little we gained from all those deaths, all that dishonor; to have found our country capable of such internal hostility; to admit that we are a self-absorbed people, then and now empty-headed about Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia and any other faraway nation -these things hurt.Our defeat has inspired many, many books; for a change, here's one about its aftermath.
NEWS
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Special to The Sun | May 28, 1995
Josephine Jacobsen seems to go through life on the lookout, somewhat like a bird-watcher. From first light onward, never knowing when poetry material will go whizzing by - or just be sitting there - and daring her to try putting it into words. She's at the beach; she's in church or at the circus; now she's watching two little girls on a trampoline. Or, "The exterminator has arrived. . . ."Every literate, long-term Marylander is aware of Josephine Jacobsen; after her 1971-73 term as what is now called the U.S. poet laureate, so is the poetry-reading world beyond.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Spires | August 16, 1998
In heaven it is always autumn. The leaves are always nearto falling there but never fall, and pairs of souls out walkingL heaven's paths no longer feel the weight of years upon them.Safe in heaven's calm, they take each other's arm,the light shining through them, all joy and terror gone.But we are far from heaven here, in a garden ragged and unkeptas Eden would be with the walls knocked down, the paths litteredwith the unswept leaves of many years, bright keepsakesL for children of the Fall.
NEWS
By Jim Bready and Jim Bready,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 21, 1997
This is the second installment in The Sun's customary year-end census of books about Maryland or by Marylanders; new books for the general reader. Sixty-four others were listed Nov. 16. (O) means oversize; (P), paperback. As to retail price, a book ordered directly from the publisher often needs about $3 more for shipping and handling.Autobiography, Memoirs"Leon's Tale," by Leon Tillage (Farrar, Straus & Giroux. 101 pages. $14) A North Carolina boyhood, recollected in anything but tranquility.
FEATURES
By SUN ART CRITIC | November 9, 1997
Josephine Jacobsen has been a published poet for 79 years, since the children's magazine St. Nicholas printed a poem when she was 10 years old. Many years later, in an essay about becoming a poet, she remembered the never-to-be-equaled experience of going down to the newsstand, buying a copy of the magazine and opening it to her first published poem:"I stood on the sidewalk, obstructive, stunned, looking at my words, naked, displayed to the world, and...
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