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By THEO LIPPMAN JR | November 29, 1993
ANNIVERSARY journalism is a staple, and I expected to see a lot of 50th anniversary of this and 50th anniversary of that this year, as the Allied war effort in World War II began to pile up victories in 1943.But there hasn't been much of it. Let me contribute a little. Fifty years ago today a war-related meeting began that a later historian described as "a concentration of physical power and political authority unique in the whole history of mankind."That was the Tehran Conference. Franklin D. Roosevelt, Winston Churchill and Joseph Stalin -- the Big Three -- met together for the first time.
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NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | November 29, 1993
ANNIVERSARY journalism is a staple, and I expected to see a lot of 50th anniversary of this and 50th anniversary of that this year, as the Allied war effort in World War II began to pile up victories in 1943.But there hasn't been much of it. Let me contribute a little. Fifty years ago today a war-related meeting began that a later historian described as "a concentration of physical power and political authority unique in the whole history of mankind."That was the Tehran Conference. Franklin D. Roosevelt, Winston Churchill and Joseph Stalin -- the Big Three -- met together for the first time.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Cox News Service | January 14, 2001
WASHINGTON -- The woman in the photo looks sad and tired, with bags under her eyes. The caption reads "Fatigue." In a second photo, though, she is smiling, alert and fresh. This caption reads "Radiance." The difference? The Beautyrest mattress, claims the advertisement from the 1920s, which suggests: "Ask your mirror about your mattress." This and about 40 other promotional materials for the Simmons Co.'s Beautyrest mattress are on display at the Smithsonian Institution's Museum of American History through the end of February.
NEWS
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2012
A student group at Towson University has again drawn criticism from other students who claim it is racist. But school administrators say they won't be taking any action against the group. On Saturday night, members of Youth for Western Civilization chalked messages that included the words "White Pride" at several locations on campus, including the Student Union and Freedom Square, said its president, Matthew Heimbach. When discovered Monday, the messages angered other students.
NEWS
March 4, 2014
You can't reason with Russian dictator Vladimir Putin. He does not know what reason is. He is like a mad dog. You can kill a mad dog and you can kill Vladimir Putin, but you can't reason with either of them. Vladimir Putin has reacted to a popular uprising in Ukraine with the sheer brute force of an invasion ( "Russia orders surrender," March 3). True to his communist roots as a KGB officer, Mr. Putin has condemned those who overthrew Viktor F. Yanukovych as Nazis or fascists.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN | March 2, 1991
STATEMENT OF the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Ethics following hearings involving Dictators:The Committee initiated Preliminary Inquiries into allegations of misconduct by Dictators Adolf Hitler, Benito Mussolini, Hideki Tojo, Joseph Stalin and Saddam Hussein in connection with invasions of and alleged atrocities in Sovereign States.The Committee has met on more than a dozen occasions to consider the evidence produced at the hearings and the written arguments of Special Counsel and counsel for the Respondent Dictators.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | April 19, 1994
If you're interested in history and current events, tonight's TV offers a don't-miss trifecta, and you can watch all three sequentially by flipping channels. Start with NBC's superb, inventive and highly original "World War II: When Lions Roared" miniseries, which dramatizes the speeches, conversations and strategies of three world leaders: Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill and Joseph Stalin. When that's over, switch to MTV, where Bill Clinton holds forth on violence. When that's over, switch to ABC, where Ted Koppel is host of a "Viewpoint" on Whitewater and the media.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | April 20, 1994
The best thing on TV tonight is the same thing that was the best thing on TV last night: NBC's "World War II: When Lions Roared." Tonight's installment is a little different: It's the conclusion, not a repeat, of that four-hour miniseries.* "Beverly Hills, 90210" (8-9 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Guest star Kathleen Robertson, the sweet daughter on "Maniac Mansion," portrays a different type of maniacal on tonight's "Beverly Hills, 90210." She plays a particularly determined friend of Brandon's.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | September 16, 1992
If you want to know how spying has really been conducted i the 20th century, "Spies" is a good video primer on this fascinating subject."Spies," a 15-part weekly documentary series, premieres at 9:30 p.m. tonight on the A&E cable channel. Most of the half-hour episodes describe espionage cases from World War II and the Cold War.Because the United States and the Soviet Union maintained the largest and most active intelligence operations during most of this period, it is fitting that the first two episodes of "Spies" deal with cases involving those countries.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | November 20, 1992
HBO lost its Joseph Stalin halfway between the script and the screen.The ambitious, meticulously photographed film has its moments, but in the end, it drowns in a mass of rubber-face, glue and cosmetics.This big-name, skillion-dollar production, lavishly photographed on location in some of the very places Stalin lived and ruled from 1924 to 1953, gets lost in pounds of Silly Putty applied too heavily to actor Robert Duvall's face.There are other problems with HBO's "Stalin," which premieres tomorrow night.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 22, 2005
WASHINGTON - The incredible news coverage given to the death of Pope John Paul II and the election of his successor, Pope Benedict XVI, may be baffling to non-Catholics. The papacy, after all, is a religious institution in a world of many religions, and Catholicism is one whose influence today is seriously questioned in this country and in others. Nobody is heard asking anymore, as Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin was said to inquire about Pope Pius XII, "How many divisions has the pope?" Pope John Paul II is widely credited with encouraging the spirit of freedom in his own Poland, marked by the growth of the Solidarity movement and the eventual tumbling of communism in Europe.
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