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Joseph Sheppard

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By Sylvia Badger | February 23, 1996
COLLECTORS and fans of artist Joseph Sheppard -- best known for his paintings -- are for the first time getting a chance to see an exhibition of his bronze and marble sculptures. Last Tuesday, at a gallery at 1100 Reisterstown Road rented by Sheppard, people showed to see the 30 sculptures at a gala opening-coming home party. Sheppard, who was raised in the Pikesville community, is donating some of the proceeds to the Pikes Theater Renaissance Campaign.Fifteen years ago, he moved to Pietrasanta, a town in Tuscany in the foothills of the Carrara Mountains in Italy.
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SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | October 22, 2011
The crowd of about 1,000 surrounding his new statue showered the greatest glove man in the history of the hot corner with a spirited and loving ovation at Saturday's unveiling ceremony. Then something quite unusual happened. Brooks Robinson wept. "I haven't had an applause like that in a long time, believe me," he said, choking up along the way. "Thank you very much. " It was a very special tribute to a very special Baltimore legend, but nobody knew how special it would feel until Robinson had trouble finding the words to thank all the people who came together on a cool afternoon outside Camden Yards to show their appreciation for his great baseball career and a life so well lived.
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NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2010
Joseph Sheppard has painted a president, sculpted a pope, written books on art and shown his work across the U.S. and Europe. But a new art gallery that opens Tuesday marks perhaps the greatest achievement of all for the Maryland-born artist: It will be the first time that a permanent gallery has opened in the state to house the works of a single living artist. "I think it's my best work," the 79-year-old Sheppard says. "If this happens at all, the artist is usually dead. This is quite unique."
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2011
As artist Joseph Sheppard pondered creating a statue of one of baseball's icons, one image of Brooks Robinson kept flashing through his mind: having stabbed a scorching grounder, the Orioles' third baseman readies to throw out the runner at first. Eyes fixed on his target, ball firmly in grasp, Robinson appears predictable, orderly, calm. "Of the hundreds of photos of Brooks that I studied, that pose kept popping up, all through his [23-year] career," Sheppard said. "Whether he had a crew cut or long hair, wore loose pants or tight pants on the field, that pose never changed.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | November 11, 2002
Picture this: A young Joseph Sheppard, with dark hair, goatee and pencil in hand, sitting in a dimly lit bar on The Block sketching the burlesque queens and their colorful clientele. Or imagine him on a stool at Mack Lewis' gym at Broadway and Eager Street watching the fighters work out and making quick impressions of their well-muscled physiques. Or perched on a rowhouse stoop behind the Maryland Institute College of Art sketching an African-American high school band as it parades down the street.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | January 11, 2000
Modernism has come and gone and come back again, but there have always been artists who stubbornly stuck to the old ways and the Old Masters. Joseph Sheppard is a Renaissance man of the old school, a master of human anatomy who can draw, paint and sculpt the figure with traditional finesse. Sheppard, whose roots here as teacher and artist go back some 50 years, is best known as the creator of Baltimore's Holocaust Memorial on Lombard Street. Sheppard's immensely varied output over the last 50 years -- which includes everything from paintings, sculpture and interior design to magazine illustrations and books on drawing and anatomy -- is the subject of a fascinating retrospective at the Joseph and Rebecca Meyerhoff Art Gallery in the Gordon Center for Performing Arts in Owings Mills.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | November 27, 2008
Maryland-born artist Joseph Sheppard will soon have a permanent gallery in the state devoted to his paintings and sculptures. The University of Maryland University College has set Dec. 2 as the groundbreaking date for the Leroy Merritt Center for the Art of Joseph Sheppard, a $6 million, 5,500-square-foot gallery that is being added to the university's Inn and Conference Center in Adelphi. "This beautiful addition to our existing galleries will stand as an enduring tribute to Sheppard, a vibrant center for lifelong learning and a unique focal point for our acclaimed arts collection," said UMUC President Susan Aldridge.
NEWS
September 8, 1999
Sister Adele de St. Eugene, 96, Little Sister of the PoorSister Adele de St. Eugene, L.S.P., a former caregiver for the elderly, died of heart failure Saturday at St. Martin's Home, the provincial residence of the Little Sisters of the Poor in Southwest Baltimore. She was 96.Until retiring in 1994, Sister Adele had cared for the elderly and infirm at a nursing home operated by the order in Newark, Del.Born Adrienne Verriest in Courtrai, Belgium, she emigrated with her family to Detroit in 1906.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 9, 2004
When I was a kid, we drank Borden's brand milk that came in glass bottles with a picture of Elsie the Cow on the label. So you know how long ago that must have been. Ever since, though, I've had a soft spot for cows, and judging from the unapologetically realistic sculptures of Pennsylvania artist J. Clayton Bright, on view in Hagerstown at the Washington County Museum of Fine Arts through Nov. 7, so does he. Bright's biography reads like that of an Old Fashioned Artist before the proliferation of Master of Fine Arts degrees succeeded in post-modernizing the outlook of anyone with a paint brush and a shred of talent.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Deitrich Curry | November 7, 2002
FEATS OF COMEDY They call it "MotionFest" -- although the part getting the most exercise will be your sense of humor. A weekend of workshops in the comic and juggling arts will culminate with a public performance at 8 p.m. Saturday at the Best Western Travel Plaza, 5652 O'Donnell St. The show will feature performers from the Cirque de Soleil and San Francisco's celebrated puppet company, Lunatic Fantastic, among others. Tickets cost $12.50 in advance and $15 at the door. Call 410-833-6777 or visit www.MotionFest.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2010
Joseph Sheppard has painted a president, sculpted a pope, written books on art and shown his work across the U.S. and Europe. But a new art gallery that opens Tuesday marks perhaps the greatest achievement of all for the Maryland-born artist: It will be the first time that a permanent gallery has opened in the state to house the works of a single living artist. "I think it's my best work," the 79-year-old Sheppard says. "If this happens at all, the artist is usually dead. This is quite unique."
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | November 27, 2008
Maryland-born artist Joseph Sheppard will soon have a permanent gallery in the state devoted to his paintings and sculptures. The University of Maryland University College has set Dec. 2 as the groundbreaking date for the Leroy Merritt Center for the Art of Joseph Sheppard, a $6 million, 5,500-square-foot gallery that is being added to the university's Inn and Conference Center in Adelphi. "This beautiful addition to our existing galleries will stand as an enduring tribute to Sheppard, a vibrant center for lifelong learning and a unique focal point for our acclaimed arts collection," said UMUC President Susan Aldridge.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | April 13, 2008
It may seem an unlikely story, but Joe Sheppard's career as portraitist to popes and cardinals had its genesis in a boxing ring. "Years ago, I used to box every Saturday at Mack Lewis' gym on Broadway," recalls the 77-year-old Maryland artist, who now lives part of each year in Pietrasanta, Italy. "One day, this guy who had been playing basketball comes over and says, `Can I box with you?' So I said OK. I never knew his name or anything." Years later, Sheppard ran into the fellow at a party.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 9, 2004
When I was a kid, we drank Borden's brand milk that came in glass bottles with a picture of Elsie the Cow on the label. So you know how long ago that must have been. Ever since, though, I've had a soft spot for cows, and judging from the unapologetically realistic sculptures of Pennsylvania artist J. Clayton Bright, on view in Hagerstown at the Washington County Museum of Fine Arts through Nov. 7, so does he. Bright's biography reads like that of an Old Fashioned Artist before the proliferation of Master of Fine Arts degrees succeeded in post-modernizing the outlook of anyone with a paint brush and a shred of talent.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | November 11, 2002
Picture this: A young Joseph Sheppard, with dark hair, goatee and pencil in hand, sitting in a dimly lit bar on The Block sketching the burlesque queens and their colorful clientele. Or imagine him on a stool at Mack Lewis' gym at Broadway and Eager Street watching the fighters work out and making quick impressions of their well-muscled physiques. Or perched on a rowhouse stoop behind the Maryland Institute College of Art sketching an African-American high school band as it parades down the street.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Deitrich Curry | November 7, 2002
FEATS OF COMEDY They call it "MotionFest" -- although the part getting the most exercise will be your sense of humor. A weekend of workshops in the comic and juggling arts will culminate with a public performance at 8 p.m. Saturday at the Best Western Travel Plaza, 5652 O'Donnell St. The show will feature performers from the Cirque de Soleil and San Francisco's celebrated puppet company, Lunatic Fantastic, among others. Tickets cost $12.50 in advance and $15 at the door. Call 410-833-6777 or visit www.MotionFest.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2011
As artist Joseph Sheppard pondered creating a statue of one of baseball's icons, one image of Brooks Robinson kept flashing through his mind: having stabbed a scorching grounder, the Orioles' third baseman readies to throw out the runner at first. Eyes fixed on his target, ball firmly in grasp, Robinson appears predictable, orderly, calm. "Of the hundreds of photos of Brooks that I studied, that pose kept popping up, all through his [23-year] career," Sheppard said. "Whether he had a crew cut or long hair, wore loose pants or tight pants on the field, that pose never changed.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | January 11, 2000
Modernism has come and gone and come back again, but there have always been artists who stubbornly stuck to the old ways and the Old Masters. Joseph Sheppard is a Renaissance man of the old school, a master of human anatomy who can draw, paint and sculpt the figure with traditional finesse. Sheppard, whose roots here as teacher and artist go back some 50 years, is best known as the creator of Baltimore's Holocaust Memorial on Lombard Street. Sheppard's immensely varied output over the last 50 years -- which includes everything from paintings, sculpture and interior design to magazine illustrations and books on drawing and anatomy -- is the subject of a fascinating retrospective at the Joseph and Rebecca Meyerhoff Art Gallery in the Gordon Center for Performing Arts in Owings Mills.
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