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Joseph Mccarthy

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By Lauren Weiner and By Lauren Weiner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 5, 1999
"Joseph McCarthy: Reexamining the Life and Legacy of America's Most Hated Senator," by Arthur Herman. Free Press. 416 pages. $26.Shouldn't Joseph McCarthy benefit from the reassessment of the Cold War now taking place with the aid of the newly opened archives in the former Soviet Union? That question is posed by Arthur Herman, a historian at George Mason University and the Smithsonian Institution. "Joseph McCarthy: Reexamining the Life and Legacy of America's Most Hated Senator" intends to show, first, that McCarthy was a pretty capable anticommunist after all -- not simply the blowhard people think he was; and, second, that the "ism" that bore his name was not as dire as it is made out to be.The book is engrossing, a smoothly written and (mostly)
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2014
Joseph L. McCarthy, a former social worker who established, sponsored and coached baseball and soccer teams to keep East Baltimore youths away from drugs and crime, died Tuesday of congestive heart and kidney failure at Genesis Loch Raven Center. The longtime Parkville resident was 78. The son of Joseph McCarthy and Angela McCarthy Gardina, Joseph Leo McCarthy was born in Baltimore and raised in Waverly. "His father died when he was 14, and he was raised by my father, Vincent Gardina, a city courthouse clerk, and my mother, who was a C&P Telephone Co. operator," said his half brother, Vincent J. Gardina, the former Baltimore County councilman who is now director of the county's Department of Environmental Protection and Sustainability.
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FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 18, 2003
The plot is labyrinthine and the characters are paper-thin, but Michael Hollinger's Red Herring, a detective/spy spoof at Everyman Theatre, is an amusing puffball of a play. One of the most amusing things about it is that, thematically, this parody of all things noir turns out to be a comedy about marriage. Indeed, when you see the various pairs aligned on stage at the end, you may be reminded of the final scene in a Shakespearean comedy. On the other hand, if you start trying to dissect the plot or make sense out of some of the characters' behavior, you could come away frustrated.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 18, 2003
The plot is labyrinthine and the characters are paper-thin, but Michael Hollinger's Red Herring, a detective/spy spoof at Everyman Theatre, is an amusing puffball of a play. One of the most amusing things about it is that, thematically, this parody of all things noir turns out to be a comedy about marriage. Indeed, when you see the various pairs aligned on stage at the end, you may be reminded of the final scene in a Shakespearean comedy. On the other hand, if you start trying to dissect the plot or make sense out of some of the characters' behavior, you could come away frustrated.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | June 5, 1993
To those who lived through them, the '50s were about as thrilling as a pot roast.Surviving tract homes in a tranquilized haze, eating TV dinners while watching "I Love Lucy," we were basically too busy conforming to society to recognize that brave new social experiments were happening all around -- and that we were the guinea pigs.The '50s, however, have been resurrected as a rich source of social research by historians, critics and journalists.With works such as David Halberstam's "The Fifties," Stephanie Coontz's "The Way We Never Were" and Brett Harvey's "The Fifties: A Women's Oral History," we can now cite this formative decade when tracing our collective neuroses, afflictions, icons, hopes and dreams.
NEWS
By George F. Will | January 27, 1998
''Have you no sense of decency, sir, at long last? Have you left no sense of decency?''-- Joseph Welch, Army special counsel, to Sen. Joseph McCarthy June 9, 1954 WASHINGTON -- Those words, spoken in a televised meetingof a Senate committee, in response to a politician's legal but contemptible behavior, lanced a boil on the body politic. They catalyzed public revulsion about Joseph McCarthy's recklessness; his swift downfall began. Today's question is: Who will speak comparable words to another political sociopath, President Clinton?
FEATURES
February 17, 2001
Ending blacklisting was his finest hour Screen tough guy Kirk Douglas, at the Berlin film festival to collect an award for his lifetime achievements, said ending Hollywood's anti-communist blacklist in 1960 was his proudest moment. The three-time Academy Award nominee and honorary Oscar winner is being feted with a retrospective at the Berlin festival and yesterday was to receive the event's top prize. But "the one thing in my career I'm most proud of is the breaking of the blacklist," the 84-year-old said at a news conference Thursday.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2014
Joseph L. McCarthy, a former social worker who established, sponsored and coached baseball and soccer teams to keep East Baltimore youths away from drugs and crime, died Tuesday of congestive heart and kidney failure at Genesis Loch Raven Center. The longtime Parkville resident was 78. The son of Joseph McCarthy and Angela McCarthy Gardina, Joseph Leo McCarthy was born in Baltimore and raised in Waverly. "His father died when he was 14, and he was raised by my father, Vincent Gardina, a city courthouse clerk, and my mother, who was a C&P Telephone Co. operator," said his half brother, Vincent J. Gardina, the former Baltimore County councilman who is now director of the county's Department of Environmental Protection and Sustainability.
FEATURES
February 9, 2004
1825: The House of Representatives elected John Quincy Adams president after no candidate received a majority of electoral votes. 1950: Sen. Joseph McCarthy, R-Wis., charged that the State Department was riddled with Communists. 1964: The Beatles made their first live appearance on American television on The Ed Sullivan Show. Associated Press
NEWS
January 27, 2000
Opponents of flag misrepresent nature of the Confederacy I have closely followed the recent attacks on the Confederate flag flying over South Carolinas capitol, (In S.C., a clash over race, heritage, Jan. 16). The arguments for taking the flag down are based upon misunderstandings or misrepresentations of what the Confederacy originally stood for. The Confederacy did not stand for slavery. The Confederate nation valued individual rights, liberty, state sovereignty, and self-determination.
FEATURES
February 17, 2001
Ending blacklisting was his finest hour Screen tough guy Kirk Douglas, at the Berlin film festival to collect an award for his lifetime achievements, said ending Hollywood's anti-communist blacklist in 1960 was his proudest moment. The three-time Academy Award nominee and honorary Oscar winner is being feted with a retrospective at the Berlin festival and yesterday was to receive the event's top prize. But "the one thing in my career I'm most proud of is the breaking of the blacklist," the 84-year-old said at a news conference Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lauren Weiner and By Lauren Weiner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 5, 1999
"Joseph McCarthy: Reexamining the Life and Legacy of America's Most Hated Senator," by Arthur Herman. Free Press. 416 pages. $26.Shouldn't Joseph McCarthy benefit from the reassessment of the Cold War now taking place with the aid of the newly opened archives in the former Soviet Union? That question is posed by Arthur Herman, a historian at George Mason University and the Smithsonian Institution. "Joseph McCarthy: Reexamining the Life and Legacy of America's Most Hated Senator" intends to show, first, that McCarthy was a pretty capable anticommunist after all -- not simply the blowhard people think he was; and, second, that the "ism" that bore his name was not as dire as it is made out to be.The book is engrossing, a smoothly written and (mostly)
NEWS
By George F. Will | January 27, 1998
''Have you no sense of decency, sir, at long last? Have you left no sense of decency?''-- Joseph Welch, Army special counsel, to Sen. Joseph McCarthy June 9, 1954 WASHINGTON -- Those words, spoken in a televised meetingof a Senate committee, in response to a politician's legal but contemptible behavior, lanced a boil on the body politic. They catalyzed public revulsion about Joseph McCarthy's recklessness; his swift downfall began. Today's question is: Who will speak comparable words to another political sociopath, President Clinton?
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | June 5, 1993
To those who lived through them, the '50s were about as thrilling as a pot roast.Surviving tract homes in a tranquilized haze, eating TV dinners while watching "I Love Lucy," we were basically too busy conforming to society to recognize that brave new social experiments were happening all around -- and that we were the guinea pigs.The '50s, however, have been resurrected as a rich source of social research by historians, critics and journalists.With works such as David Halberstam's "The Fifties," Stephanie Coontz's "The Way We Never Were" and Brett Harvey's "The Fifties: A Women's Oral History," we can now cite this formative decade when tracing our collective neuroses, afflictions, icons, hopes and dreams.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 1, 1998
"Point of Order" is an absorbing, often funny series of highlights from the 1954 hearings that pitted Sen. Joseph McCarthy against the U.S. Army. The Army accused McCarthy and his lawyer, Roy Cohn, of trying to muscle top brass into giving preferential treatment to another McCarthy associate, David Schine; McCarthy counter-charged that the Army was just trying to pre-empt his investigation of the Defense Department for Communists.Culled from 188 hours of their televised broadcast, "Point of Order" is an idiosyncratic, almost abstract portrait of a demagogue brought down by the very process he had been exploiting for years.
NEWS
September 13, 2011
During the McCarthy hearings, Army counsel Joseph Welch finally had enough and asked Sen. Joseph McCarthy if he had no sense of decency. I ask the same of The Sun's Dan Rodricks and Jean Marbella for their columns of Sept. 11. Instead of reflecting on the approximately 3,000 innocent lives snuffed out, Mr. Rodricks used his column to launch into a not-so-thinly-veiled attack on President Bush and the Iraq war, trying to connect that war and Sept. 11. He seems to forget that the Sept.
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