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Joseph Clarke

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NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writer | May 19, 1994
It's a more cautious era at Baltimore's Board of Estimates, seven months after Comptroller Jacqueline F. McLean slipped a million-dollar deal past her colleagues to lease the former headquarters of her travel agency to the city.Concerned by even the slightest chance of impropriety after the comptroller's indictment on theft and misconduct charges, City Solicitor Neal M. Janey yesterday asked that the board delay voting on two items involving the spouses of the mayor and council president.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
The city's Board of Estimates is to vote Wednesday on a plan for a hotel on the historic Recreation Pier in Fells Point, calling for the city to alter an ordinance to allow the Under Armour CEO Kevin Plank-backed hotel to proceed without a public promenade around the property. Instead of the promenade, Sagamore Development Co., controlled by Plank and Chevy Chase developer Marc Weller, would be required to make improvements to Thames Street, from Ann Street to South Broadway and in front of the pier, according to the agenda for Wednesday's Board of Estimates meeting.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
A development group backed by Under Armour CEO Kevin Plank could breathe new life into a stalled plan to transform the landmark and long-vacant Recreation Pier in Fells Point into a luxury hotel. A representative of Sagamore Development LLC presented plans for a 128-room hotel with a restaurant and a pool during Wednesday's annual meeting of the Fells Point Main Street organization, according to people who attended the meeting. Built in 1914, the Recreation Pier originally stored port cargo.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
A development group backed by Under Armour CEO Kevin Plank could breathe new life into a stalled plan to transform the landmark and long-vacant Recreation Pier in Fells Point into a luxury hotel. A representative of Sagamore Development LLC presented plans for a 128-room hotel with a restaurant and a pool during Wednesday's annual meeting of the Fells Point Main Street organization, according to people who attended the meeting. Built in 1914, the Recreation Pier originally stored port cargo.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
The city's Board of Estimates is to vote Wednesday on a plan for a hotel on the historic Recreation Pier in Fells Point, calling for the city to alter an ordinance to allow the Under Armour CEO Kevin Plank-backed hotel to proceed without a public promenade around the property. Instead of the promenade, Sagamore Development Co., controlled by Plank and Chevy Chase developer Marc Weller, would be required to make improvements to Thames Street, from Ann Street to South Broadway and in front of the pier, according to the agenda for Wednesday's Board of Estimates meeting.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | November 29, 2004
The northeast corner of Light and Redwood streets has long been a place for people on the move - most recently as the site of the 14-story Southern Hotel and before that as the setting for the historic Fountain Inn. But it may soon be the address for people who want to make downtown Baltimore their more permanent home, if the owners proceed with their latest redevelopment plan. Seeking to tap into the growing market for upscale housing in Baltimore's central business district, J. Joseph Clarke Enterprises and Capital Guidance Corp.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | June 2, 1994
If Baltimore's vacant Southern Hotel were a cat, it would have used up its nine lives long ago.Targeted at various times for reuse as a hotel, offices, apartments and luxury housing for the elderly, the 14-story building has long attracted attention from developers. When an affiliate of Washington's Capital Guidance Corp. won permission to raze the city landmark to make way for a 45-story office tower called One Light Street, that appeared to be the end of it.But 4 1/2 years after Baltimore's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation approved the demolition request, Baltimore's most tenacious empty building continues to grace dTC the northeast corner of Light and Redwood streets.
NEWS
August 7, 1999
A crowd at the city tillWe should all be grateful to J. Joseph Clarke ("Developer presses for tax breaks," Aug. 1) for exposing the arrogance of developers who demand tax subsidies.Mr. Clarke's threat to leave a giant scar in the middle of downtown if he doesn't get a tax exemption is shameless political extortion.The danger of these so-called PILOTS (payments in lieu of taxes) is that developers have come to regard them as a matter of right anywhere downtown.Mr. Clarke's project is a classic mixed commercial development -- without even the pretense of being a convention hotel.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1993
The owners of the vacant Southern Hotel on Light Street received a four-year guarantee from the city zoning board yesterday that they had until 1997 to start construction at the site.Zoning board members extended the variance, which is needed to build a $180 million, 44-story tower, after an agent for the owners said that a four-year guarantee from the city was crucial to attracting tenants in a soft market.The project, proposed two years before the commercial real estate downturn began, would be the tallest building in Baltimore.
BUSINESS
March 23, 2010
A long-stalled plan to transform the landmark Recreation Pier in Fells Point into a hotel is moving ahead, say Baltimore officials who announced they closed on the $2 million sale of the dilapidated property to developers. The sale paves the way for a $35 million, 132-room Aloft hotel with a restaurant, said officials with the city's Department of Housing and Community Development. The new owners include city developer J. Joseph Clarke and H&S Properties Development, which built Harbor East.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | November 29, 2004
The northeast corner of Light and Redwood streets has long been a place for people on the move - most recently as the site of the 14-story Southern Hotel and before that as the setting for the historic Fountain Inn. But it may soon be the address for people who want to make downtown Baltimore their more permanent home, if the owners proceed with their latest redevelopment plan. Seeking to tap into the growing market for upscale housing in Baltimore's central business district, J. Joseph Clarke Enterprises and Capital Guidance Corp.
NEWS
August 7, 1999
A crowd at the city tillWe should all be grateful to J. Joseph Clarke ("Developer presses for tax breaks," Aug. 1) for exposing the arrogance of developers who demand tax subsidies.Mr. Clarke's threat to leave a giant scar in the middle of downtown if he doesn't get a tax exemption is shameless political extortion.The danger of these so-called PILOTS (payments in lieu of taxes) is that developers have come to regard them as a matter of right anywhere downtown.Mr. Clarke's project is a classic mixed commercial development -- without even the pretense of being a convention hotel.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | June 2, 1994
If Baltimore's vacant Southern Hotel were a cat, it would have used up its nine lives long ago.Targeted at various times for reuse as a hotel, offices, apartments and luxury housing for the elderly, the 14-story building has long attracted attention from developers. When an affiliate of Washington's Capital Guidance Corp. won permission to raze the city landmark to make way for a 45-story office tower called One Light Street, that appeared to be the end of it.But 4 1/2 years after Baltimore's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation approved the demolition request, Baltimore's most tenacious empty building continues to grace dTC the northeast corner of Light and Redwood streets.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writer | May 19, 1994
It's a more cautious era at Baltimore's Board of Estimates, seven months after Comptroller Jacqueline F. McLean slipped a million-dollar deal past her colleagues to lease the former headquarters of her travel agency to the city.Concerned by even the slightest chance of impropriety after the comptroller's indictment on theft and misconduct charges, City Solicitor Neal M. Janey yesterday asked that the board delay voting on two items involving the spouses of the mayor and council president.
NEWS
November 4, 2001
IF THIS is recession, Baltimore is entering it with fanfare. On Thursday, ground will be broken for Lockwood Place, an office complex on Pratt Street across from the National Aquarium. On Nov. 14, a similar ceremony is scheduled for Montgomery Park, an old warehouse that is being converted into the city's biggest office center. Groundbreaking is something of a misnomer, because work at both sites has been going on for some time. At Montgomery Park, developers are under the gun to get parts of the 28-acre colossus ready for 900 Maryland Department of the Environment employees.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella | lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | March 22, 2010
A long-stalled plan to transform the landmark Recreation Pier in Fells Point into a hotel is moving ahead, say Baltimore officials who announced they closed on the $2 million sale of the dilapidated property to developers. The sale to Recreation Pier Developers LLC paves the way for a $35 million, 132-room Aloft hotel with a restaurant, said officials with the city's Department of Housing and Community Development. The new owners include city developer J. Joseph Clarke and H&S Properties Development, which built Harbor East.
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