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By DIANE SCHARPER | June 1, 1991
When World War II ended, the Nobel-Prize-winning poet Joseph Brodsky was 5 years old. Yet he remembers much of the post-war chaos. One scene, in particular, stands out.It occurred as an old, bald, man with a wooden leg tried numerous times to get into one of the railway cars. But people besieged the cattle trains ''like mad insects.'' and each time the man was pushed away. After the train started to move, he managed to grab the handle of one of the cars. Then a woman lifted a kettle and poured boiling water straight onto his head.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL COLLIER | December 23, 2001
"Ever since I took to writing poems seriously," Nobel laureate Joseph Brodsky tells us, "I've tried to write a poem every Christmas -- as a sort of birthday greeting." The first, "Christmas Ballad," was written in 1962, and the last, "Flight Into Egypt (2)," in 1995, the year before Brodsky's death. The poems about the birth of Jesus -- 18 in all -- fill the recently published Nativity Poems. While the Nobel laureate is the translator of a few of his poems, most of them are rendered by distinguished contemporary poets, including Anthony Hecht, Paul Muldoon, Richard Wilbur, Glyn Maxwell and Nobel laureates Seamus Heaney and Derek Walcott.
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NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | January 31, 1996
Joseph Brodsky began his literary career in a country that took poetry seriously -- seriously enough to send him to a labor camp for writing it. In a Russian tradition that predated the Soviet era, his poems infuriated the authorities, turned him into a major public figure and attracted devoted readers who risked arrest merely by possessing underground copies of his work."
FEATURES
By Craig Eisendrath and Craig Eisendrath,Special to the sun | August 2, 1998
"An Embarrassment of Tyrannies: Twenty-Five Years of Index on Censorship," by George Braziller. W.L Webb and Rose Bell. 347 pages. $30.In 1972, Index on Censorship published its first issuprotesting Soviet show trials of dissidents Larisa Daniel and Pavel Litvinov. With this volume, editors W.L. Webb and Rose Bell offer a stunning anthology of 65 selections that not only celebrates the magazine, but provides a history of censorship, repression and resistance around the globe. Poems, short stories, polemics, narratives, interviews and analyses mix freely in this kaleidoscopic chronology.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL COLLIER | December 23, 2001
"Ever since I took to writing poems seriously," Nobel laureate Joseph Brodsky tells us, "I've tried to write a poem every Christmas -- as a sort of birthday greeting." The first, "Christmas Ballad," was written in 1962, and the last, "Flight Into Egypt (2)," in 1995, the year before Brodsky's death. The poems about the birth of Jesus -- 18 in all -- fill the recently published Nativity Poems. While the Nobel laureate is the translator of a few of his poems, most of them are rendered by distinguished contemporary poets, including Anthony Hecht, Paul Muldoon, Richard Wilbur, Glyn Maxwell and Nobel laureates Seamus Heaney and Derek Walcott.
NEWS
January 29, 1996
Joseph Brodsky, 55, a Russian exile and Nobel Prize-winning poet who became poet laureate of the United States, died of a heart attack in his sleep yesterday at his Brooklyn, N.Y., home."
NEWS
By Stephen Margulies | August 30, 1992
WATERMARK.Joseph Brodsky.Farrar, Straus & Giroux.135 pages. $15.Falling in love with certain books can be like falling in love with certain human beings. At first, there may be indifference, incomprehension and even dislike. Then -- gradually or suddenly -- the bandages of misunderstanding unwrap themselves to reveal one's touchable fate: the luminous doom of recognizing the almost intolerably high value of something or someone outside of oneself.At this point, I am no more than half in love with "Watermark," Joseph Brodsky's abrasively lyrical book on Venice.
FEATURES
By JACKIE POWDER and JACKIE POWDER,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1996
He stood at the head of the classroom, dressed in his uniform of dirty jeans and a tweed jacket, encircled by the cigarette butts he had tossed to the floor while chain-smoking and discussing the poetry of W.H. Auden and Thomas Hardy.That's how Nobel Prize-winning poet Joseph Brodsky, who died Sunday of a heart attack at 55, looked to his students at Mount Holyoke College. He was the kind of professor who marked papers with "B, for barely readable" and insisted that his students memorize poems to immerse themselves in their language and meter.
FEATURES
By Craig Eisendrath and Craig Eisendrath,Special to the sun | August 2, 1998
"An Embarrassment of Tyrannies: Twenty-Five Years of Index on Censorship," by George Braziller. W.L Webb and Rose Bell. 347 pages. $30.In 1972, Index on Censorship published its first issuprotesting Soviet show trials of dissidents Larisa Daniel and Pavel Litvinov. With this volume, editors W.L. Webb and Rose Bell offer a stunning anthology of 65 selections that not only celebrates the magazine, but provides a history of censorship, repression and resistance around the globe. Poems, short stories, polemics, narratives, interviews and analyses mix freely in this kaleidoscopic chronology.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1996
"The United States of Poetry," a five-part, 2 1/2 -hour series debuting on MPT at 11 tonight, is not so much about verse as about diversity, about finding the artistic muse everywhere, about how all-encompassing the word "talent" is.Thus, this scattershot anthology of American poets embraces everyone from a freckle-faced Idaho third-grader to a woman of 70-plus years living in Arkansas with her husband and 50 cats. It features the work of a homeless man living in L.A. and a former president of the United States.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1996
"The United States of Poetry," a five-part, 2 1/2 -hour series debuting on MPT at 11 tonight, is not so much about verse as about diversity, about finding the artistic muse everywhere, about how all-encompassing the word "talent" is.Thus, this scattershot anthology of American poets embraces everyone from a freckle-faced Idaho third-grader to a woman of 70-plus years living in Arkansas with her husband and 50 cats. It features the work of a homeless man living in L.A. and a former president of the United States.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | January 31, 1996
Joseph Brodsky began his literary career in a country that took poetry seriously -- seriously enough to send him to a labor camp for writing it. In a Russian tradition that predated the Soviet era, his poems infuriated the authorities, turned him into a major public figure and attracted devoted readers who risked arrest merely by possessing underground copies of his work."
FEATURES
By JACKIE POWDER and JACKIE POWDER,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1996
He stood at the head of the classroom, dressed in his uniform of dirty jeans and a tweed jacket, encircled by the cigarette butts he had tossed to the floor while chain-smoking and discussing the poetry of W.H. Auden and Thomas Hardy.That's how Nobel Prize-winning poet Joseph Brodsky, who died Sunday of a heart attack at 55, looked to his students at Mount Holyoke College. He was the kind of professor who marked papers with "B, for barely readable" and insisted that his students memorize poems to immerse themselves in their language and meter.
NEWS
January 29, 1996
Joseph Brodsky, 55, a Russian exile and Nobel Prize-winning poet who became poet laureate of the United States, died of a heart attack in his sleep yesterday at his Brooklyn, N.Y., home."
NEWS
By Stephen Margulies | August 30, 1992
WATERMARK.Joseph Brodsky.Farrar, Straus & Giroux.135 pages. $15.Falling in love with certain books can be like falling in love with certain human beings. At first, there may be indifference, incomprehension and even dislike. Then -- gradually or suddenly -- the bandages of misunderstanding unwrap themselves to reveal one's touchable fate: the luminous doom of recognizing the almost intolerably high value of something or someone outside of oneself.At this point, I am no more than half in love with "Watermark," Joseph Brodsky's abrasively lyrical book on Venice.
NEWS
By DIANE SCHARPER | June 1, 1991
When World War II ended, the Nobel-Prize-winning poet Joseph Brodsky was 5 years old. Yet he remembers much of the post-war chaos. One scene, in particular, stands out.It occurred as an old, bald, man with a wooden leg tried numerous times to get into one of the railway cars. But people besieged the cattle trains ''like mad insects.'' and each time the man was pushed away. After the train started to move, he managed to grab the handle of one of the cars. Then a woman lifted a kettle and poured boiling water straight onto his head.
NEWS
By Joseph Brodsky | November 20, 1992
As you pour yourself a scotch,crush a roach, or check your watch,as your hand adjusts your tie,people die.In the towns with funny names,hit by bullets, caught in flames,by and large not knowing why,people die.In small places you don't knowof, yet big for having nochance to scream or say good-bye,people die.People die as you electnew apostles of neglect,self-restraint, etc. -- wherebypeople die.Too far off to practice lovefor thy neighbor/brother Slav,where your...
NEWS
April 22, 2000
Carmen Dillon, 91, who won an Academy Award in 1948 for her work as art director on Laurence Olivier's "Hamlet," died April 12 in London. Ms. Dillon, who created sets for many memorable British films for more than 40 years, was the first female art director in the British film industry. Dillon joined the art department at Fox Studios north of London in the 1930s after six years of training as an architect. She worked with Paul Sherriff on the Academy Award-nominated design for Olivier's 1944 classic "Henry V," but it was her work on Olivier's "Hamlet" that won her the Oscar -- for set direction on a black-and-white film.
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