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Joseph Balkoski

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By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2004
Why was D-Day important? Why is it remembered today? Why will it be recognized for a thousand years? Put these questions to Joe Balkoski, and he will understand immediately that these are not idle or obvious questions. These are questions that consume his days. Ultimately, he expects that June 6, 1944, the day Allied troops landed in Normandy and turned the tide in World War II, will live in perpetuity. IIt has taken 60 years for the story of D-Day to seem as emblematic to Americans as Abraham Lincoln's appearance at Gettysburg.
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By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2004
Why was D-Day important? Why is it remembered today? Why will it be recognized for a thousand years? Put these questions to Joe Balkoski, and he will understand immediately that these are not idle or obvious questions. These are questions that consume his days. Ultimately, he expects that June 6, 1944, the day Allied troops landed in Normandy and turned the tide in World War II, will live in perpetuity. IIt has taken 60 years for the story of D-Day to seem as emblematic to Americans as Abraham Lincoln's appearance at Gettysburg.
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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2002
Arthur L. Flinner, a retired accountant and World War II Army captain who fought at D-Day and later established a military museum in Pikesville, died Thursday of complications after surgery at St. Agnes Health- Care. He was 89 and lived at Charlestown Retirement Community for the past four years. He had resided earlier in the Armagh Village section of Baltimore County. An accountant with Federal Express Money Orders in Glen Burnie and at his son's Craig Flinner Gallery in the Mount Vernon section of downtown Baltimore for the past 20 years, he was born in Cambridge, Mass.
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By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | August 2, 2009
After nearly a century, Maryland's venerable 110th Field Artillery will soon fade into the history books. Its colors will be furled for the last time in a solemn military deactivation ceremony that is open to the public and begins at 10 a.m. Saturday at its headquarters at the Pikesville Armory, 610 Reisterstown Road. The unit, which traces its heritage to earlier artillery units in the Revolutionary War and the Battle of North Point during the War of 1812, is being phased out because of an Army reorganization.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts, Sarah Kickler Kelber, Mary Carole McCauley, Rashod D. Ollison, Tim Smith and Michael Sragow | February 26, 2009
POP MUSIC Singing jazz Kurt Elling is one of the most daring male vocalists working in jazz today. A sharply intelligent stylist with an expansive range, he pays tribute to Johnny Hartman and John Coltrane in a show of graceful standards at 9:30 p.m. Saturday at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, 2700 F St. N.W., Washington. Tickets are $30. Call 800-444-1324 or 202-467-4600 or go to kennedy-center.org. FILM At the Charles You've seen the winners of America's Oscars; now take a chance on the movie that won four top Cesar Awards (the French Oscars)
NEWS
By JONATHAN PITTS and JONATHAN PITTS,SUN REPORTER | May 16, 2006
Despite obligations in Iraq and continuing hurricane recovery efforts in the South, officials with the National Guard suggested yesterday that its forces could take on added border security duties without unduly straining the organization. Their assessment came amid criticisms that President Bush's plan to deploy several thousand Guard members in assisting with border patrols would overly burden units stretched thin by other demands. "By any rational measure, this wouldn't strain the Guard's resources much," said Joseph Balkoski, command historian of the Maryland National Guard.
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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun Reporter | June 1, 2008
He described his experience at the Allied invasion of Europe as "90 percent boredom and 10 percent terror." Dr. Edmund G. Beacham, who as a young Army physician crossed the English Channel to land in France on June 7, 1944, died of heart disease Tuesday at Stella Maris hospice. The Towson resident was 93. "Almost whole neighborhoods of men were killed. I don't think anyone envisioned those kinds of casualties. We had clearing stations set up for maybe 900 men over a three-day period. And we were getting 2,100 casualties a day," he told a Sun reporter in 1989.
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By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | November 11, 1999
According to Army regulations, a Silver Star -- one of the military's highest honors -- is awarded to a "person who is cited for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United States." But World War II veteran Joseph Farinholt, a wiry 77-year-old with little patience for military-speak, translates the requirements this way: "Be as crazy as hell." Farinholt should know. He was awarded the Silver Star four times during World War II -- the only soldier to do so, local veterans groups believe.
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By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2001
John Theodore "Jack" King III, a retired Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. executive and a highly decorated World War II veteran, died Friday of complications from pneumonia at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 84 and had lived for 35 years in Guilford before moving to Roland Park Place in 1995. In June 1944, King, then a captain, received an order from the 29th Infantry Division commander in Normandy that he compared to the Charge of the Light Brigade: march his 150 men in Company K three miles to the Vire River, secure the bridge and seize the village of Auville - linking the Omaha and Utah beachheads.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | May 19, 2006
Benjamin F. Dean, retired commanding general of the Maryland Army National Guard, died of cancer Monday at his Cockeysville home. He was 85. Born in Harrisonburg, Va., he left school to help support his family and worked as a lineman stringing wires in a remote area that had no electricity. He enlisted as a private in a local National Guard unit in 1938 and was inducted into federal service as part of the 29th Infantry Division in 1941. That year he became a first sergeant and entered Officer Candidate School at Edgewood, graduating as a lieutenant in the Chemical Corps in 1942.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 21, 1999
The collection and preservation of war relics from the 18th century to the Persian Gulf war -- specifically conflicts that engaged the Maryland National Guard -- was the lifelong passion of retired Brig. Gen. Bernard Feingold of the Guard.General Feingold, who created the Maryland National Guard Museum at Baltimore's 5th Regiment Armory and later was its director and curator, died Thursday of cancer at Sinai Hospital. The Northwest Baltimore resident was 76.A former soldier with an insatiable curiosity and appreciation for the minutiae as well as the grand sweep of war, General Feingold possessed vast knowledge of military history, tactics, battles and personalities.
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