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By New York Times News Service | October 17, 1994
TOKYO -- Kim Jong Il, the son of North Korea's former leader, appeared in public yesterday for the first time in nearly three months, partly allaying suspicions that he is ill and raising expectations that he will soon complete the process of formally succeeding his father, who died in July.Mr. Kim appeared yesterday afternoon in Pyongyang, the North Korean capital, at a ceremony to mark the end of the 100-day mourning period for his father, Kim Il Sung.North Korea released television pictures showing Mr. Kim, flanked by other officials, standing on a balcony overlooking a plaza filled with thousands of people.
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NEWS
December 19, 2011
The death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il leaves a cloud of uncertainty over North Asia and complicates efforts by the U.S. and its allies to halt the nuclear weapons program that is the principal legacy of his 17-year rule. Kim was a canny and manipulative despot who repeatedly thwarted efforts by more powerful neighbors and adversaries like the United States to stabilize the Korean peninsula. Now that he is gone, the internal power struggle over succession could have unpredictable and perhaps dangerous consequences for the region and the world.
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NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 13, 2000
SEOUL, South Korea - After a day's delay, South Korean President Kim Dae Jung flew into enemy territory this morning for a summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Il in hopes of bringing peace to the Korean Peninsula after more than a half century of hatred. About 180 South Korean officials were to join Kim on the 108-mile flight from Seoul to Pyongyang, the North Korean capital. The two leaders were scheduled to hold at least two meetings and attend a pair of banquets. Kim is scheduled to return Thursday, driving across the Demilitarized Zone at Panmunjom, where the north and south signed an armistice in 1953, halting the Korean War. The summit is the first between the leaders of the divided peninsula since it split at the end of World War II. Analysts and South Korean officials say the meetings are unlikely to lead to any breakthroughs, but see the summit as a hopeful first step towards reconciling the Cold War rivals.
NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and James Gerstenzang,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 7, 2007
WASHINGTON -- In his first known direct communication with the leader of North Korea, whom his administration has called a "tyrannical rogue," President Bush sent Kim Jong Il a hand-signed letter reminding him of his commitment to disclose the details of his country's nuclear weapons program by the end of the year, the White House said yesterday. The letter was one in a series Bush dispatched to the participants of the so-called six-party talks aimed at securing the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 16, 2000
SEOUL, South Korea - South Korean President Kim Dae Jung returned home to a hero's welcome yesterday after his historic summit in Pyongyang, taking a victory lap through the capital and shaking hands with well-wishers as crowds numbering in the tens of thousands lined the boulevards waving national flags. Soon after landing, Kim tried to temper the euphoria in a speech which briefly outlined some the challenges that lie ahead if North and South Korea - two starkly different countries - are to reconcile and build a lasting peace after a half-century of living in a state of war. Kim urged his counterpart, North Korean leader Kim Jong Il, to implement the agreement they signed late Wednesday which calls for the reunion of families separated since the Korean War (1950-1953)
NEWS
By FRANK LANGFITT and FRANK LANGFITT,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 14, 2000
SEOUL, South Korea - South Koreans may not have known what to expect when their president arrived in dangerous and much-reviled North Korea yesterday, but nothing prepared them for the unprecedented welcome he received at the first summit since the Cold War enemies split more than a half-century ago. In a surprise move that opened the meeting on a hopeful note, North Korea's reclusive leader Kim Jong Il met South Korea's President Kim Dae Jung at Sunan...
NEWS
By Hal Piper | November 5, 2002
SEOUL -- Considering that we in the South Korean capital live within artillery range of a failed state run by a pathological liar with a huge army, deadly missiles and a nuclear weapons program, the situation seems pretty stable. So I have a solution -- "regime change," as they say in Washington. No, not by force of arms, the way President Bush wants to change Iraq's regime. That would be lunacy. I don't want Kim Jong Il's soldiers marching this way. I'm thinking, rather, of what Mr. Bush and Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon are trying to do to Yasser Arafat -- declare him irrelevant and wait for "moderate elements" to come forward.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 12, 2000
SEOUL, South Korea - Until recently, North Korea's Kim Jong Il was widely regarded as one of the world's nastiest and most eccentric leaders. Cutting a distinctive figure in a black pompadour, platform shoes and a gray Mao-style suit, the pudgy, 58-year-old dictator has been famous for his taste in nubile actresses, luxury cars and movies. He presides over a hermit government that, having failed to feed its citizens, routinely imprisons and even executes those who try to flee abroad so that they can eat. So why are so many people saying such nice things about Kim Jong Il these days?
NEWS
June 14, 2000
ONE OF THE world's most modern countries met one of its most backward yesterday, when Kim Jong Il welcomed Kim Dae Jung to Pyongyang. Both are Korea. The meeting holds hope of ending one of the great tragedies remaining from the falling-out of the Allies who won World War II, the open wound separating two halves of one country. North Korea is an orphan satellite of a Soviet Union that no longer exists and a China seeking commerce with South Korea. It is the last forbidden place, isolated and unknown, easy to demonize.
NEWS
October 26, 2000
KIM JONG IL'S peace offensive toward the United States took more shape during the visit of Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright. The main promise was not the possible visit of President Clinton, but the scheduled lower-level talks on arms-control issues. North Korea's hereditary dictator, until recently regarded in Washington as a demented madman, casually offered a pledge never to launch another rocket into space. That implies abandoning missiles that could hit the continental United States.
NEWS
By Bruce Wallace and Bruce Wallace,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 1, 2006
SEOUL, South Korea -- When South Koreans observe the world's attempt to choke the flow of French cognac, designer watches, flashy cars and other luxuries to North Korean dictator Kim Jong Il, they find themselves in a familiar situation. Bitterly divided. The call by the United Nations Security Council to ban exports of luxury goods to North Korea has been met with a certain satisfaction in capitals such as Washington and Tokyo, landing at least a quick jab in negotiations over Pyongyang's nuclear program that resemble boxers in an endless clinch.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 19, 2006
BEIJING --Kim Jong Il, the North Korean leader, completed an eight-day visit to China yesterday that was notable for his intensive focus on China's booming economy and for the air of secrecy that enshrouded his every move. Chinese and North Korean state media made nearly simultaneous announcements of Kim's visit late yesterday afternoon after more than a week of rampant speculation in regional media about the North Korean leader's itinerary that both countries had repeatedly declined to confirm or deny.
NEWS
By Bradley K. Martin | February 15, 2005
MORE THAN half a century after the Korean War armistice, the United States and North Korea have yet to turn that shaky cease-fire into real peace. It is time for President Bush to negotiate an end to enmity with North Korea and with its "Dear Leader," Kim Jong Il. Consider: Osama bin Laden is on record as hoping to acquire a nuclear weapon. Where would he buy one? The New York Times recently reported that North Korea was suspected of having sold processed uranium to Libya. As long as Pyongyang proceeds with its nuclear program, as it publicly acknowledged last week, no one can rule out the possibility it might sell complete weapons to its enemies' enemies.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 11, 2005
BEIJING - North Korea's declaration yesterday that it had "manufactured nuclear weapons" put pressure on the Bush administration and North Korea's neighbors, including its ally China, to change strategies for containing a regime the United States already considered a dangerous exporter of weapons and technology. North Korea had previously declared that it was intent on developing what it called a "nuclear deterrent." But its official statement yesterday went further by asserting that it now had nuclear weapons on hand.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 18, 2004
TOKYO - While reports filter out of North Korea that portraits of the country's leader, Kim Jong Il, have been removed from their honored spots, the official radio and news agency are dropping the honorific "Dear Leader" from their reports on Kim, according to Radiopress, a Japanese news agency that monitors North Korea's radio. Analysts are debating whether Kim is losing his grip on power, or, more likely, quietly orchestrating the downsizing of his own personality cult. As the nation's propaganda chief in the 1970s, Kim paved his way to power by raising his father, Kim Il Sung, to demigod status as founder of the Communist state.
NEWS
By Michael A. Lev and Michael A. Lev,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 23, 2004
BEIJING - Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi finished a one-day trip to North Korea yesterday with a modest diplomatic victory, arranging to bring home five family members of Japanese citizens who had been kidnapped by the North Korean regime years ago. The five North Korean-born children of the abductees were flown to Japan almost immediately, but left behind were Charles Jenkins, the American husband of another former abductee, and their two...
NEWS
By Mona Charen | July 25, 1994
THERE WAS a flap in Washington recently over President Bill Clinton's statement of condolence to the people of North Korea after the death of Kim Il Sung.Sen. Bob Dole, R-Kan., issued a press release asking whether the president had forgotten "that Kim Il Sung was responsible for the war that caused the loss of more than 54,000 American lives." Other Republicans chimed in that we hadn't sent condolences on the death of Mao Zedong.The president's defenders went right to their libraries and came up with the letters issued by Presidents Ford and Eisenhower.
NEWS
By Richard Halloran | December 23, 2002
HONOLULU - Americans might be tempted to brush off North Korea's diplomacy by diatribe and threats of war as so much bluster from a painfully weak nation. That would be a mistake, because North Korean leaders are so ignorant of the outside world that they might believe their own propaganda and miscalculate. The government of Kim Jong Il, known in Pyongyang as the "Dear Leader," says the Korean peninsula "is on the verge of war." Through its Korean Central News Agency, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea proclaims: "The army and people of the DPRK, with burning hatred for the Yankees, are in full readiness to fight a death-defying battle."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 30, 2003
SEOUL, South Korea - South Korea's top strategist for North Korea, Lim Dong Won, returned here yesterday from a two-day mission to Pyongyang after failing to obtain a crucial appointment with North Korea's leader, Kim Jong Il. Lim, who has engineered South Korea's so-called sunshine policy of reconciliation with the North on behalf of President Kim Dae Jung, said it might have been the last chance under Kim Dae Jung's presidency to resolve the nuclear crisis....
NEWS
By Richard Halloran | December 23, 2002
HONOLULU - Americans might be tempted to brush off North Korea's diplomacy by diatribe and threats of war as so much bluster from a painfully weak nation. That would be a mistake, because North Korean leaders are so ignorant of the outside world that they might believe their own propaganda and miscalculate. The government of Kim Jong Il, known in Pyongyang as the "Dear Leader," says the Korean peninsula "is on the verge of war." Through its Korean Central News Agency, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea proclaims: "The army and people of the DPRK, with burning hatred for the Yankees, are in full readiness to fight a death-defying battle."
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