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NEWS
March 30, 1998
This is an excerpt of a Thursday Chicago Tribune editorial:Once again, the nation has been convulsed by a heinous act of violence apparently committed by a child. Two children, in fact, one of them 11 years old and the other 13.Somehow, the authorities say, the two boys acquired a small arsenal and used it Tuesday to shoot down 15 students and teachers at the Westside Middle School in Jonesboro, Ark. Four of those students and one of the teachers died as a result of their wounds.And while the origins of the guns used in the Jonesboro shootings remain unclear, the fact that Arkansas law permits children to own firearms suggests another question: Even by the most expansive reading of the Second Amendment, can the Founding Fathers have had 11- and 13-year-olds nursing schoolboy grievances in mind when they wrote that "the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed"?
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NEWS
November 13, 1998
HE "appeared to be a very nice, handsome young man."-- a neighbor describing Joshua Earl Patrick Phillips, the 14-year-old from Jacksonville, Fla., charged this week with the murder of an 8-year-old girl, whose battered, stabbed and decomposing body was found stuffed beneath his water bed."The thing that stood out the most was his conduct. He was one you never had to call down, say 'Get quiet, let's don't do that.' He was always so polite, so well-mannered."-- a pastor's wife describing Mitchell Johnson, the 13-year-old who was convicted with friend Andrew Golden, 12, of killing four schoolmates and a teacher in Jonesboro, Ark., last March.
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NEWS
By Froma Harrop | April 2, 1998
HOW could this happen in a nice place like Jonesboro?" the residents of this neighborly Arkansas town ask. "How could it happen here?" the media repeat, like well-trained parrots. As long as people keep asking this irrelevant question, they're not going to find out what happened.A town or city is not good or bad. It is a mere geographical designation, a stage set for the lives that families make for themselves. Moments after the gruesome ambush of schoolchildren by two classmates, 13 and 11 -- before the first word of the boys' biographies was typed -- social scientists knew what they were dealing with: The boys are the products of abuse or neglect.
NEWS
By CAROL TAVIS | May 31, 1998
Carol Tavris' name was misspelled in the byline and credit line for an article on school violence that appeared Sunday in the Perspective section.The Sun regrets the errors.Oh, no, we say, reading the news with horror and helplessness, another teen-age boy on a murderous rampage. This time it's a 15-year-old in Oregon who allegedly killed his parents and two fellow students. We haven't recovered from the incident involving the 11- and 13-year-olds in Jonesboro, Ark., who are accused of killing a teacher and four students March 24.These acts of vengeful cruelty, occurring not in the mean big city but in close-knit small communities, are especially threatening to our sense of safety and order.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 29, 1998
JONESBORO, Ark. -- Shannon Wright, who threw herself into the path of a bullet to save her sixth-grade pupil, was remembered yesterday as a hero as the final victims of Tuesday's shooting spree at Westside Middle School were laid to rest.The 32-year-old teacher -- who leaves a husband and a 2-year-old son -- was memorialized at a packed service five miles from the scene of the bloody schoolyard ambush that claimed the lives of Wright and four young girls and injured 10 others.Services for 12-year-old Stephanie Johnson and 11-year-old Brittney Varner were held yesterday.
NEWS
March 26, 1998
HOW DO YOU prevent tragedies such as the one that stunned Jonesboro, Ark., when two boys in fatigues ambushed their middle-school classmates and killed four girls and a teacher?Open your eyes.After the shooting in the northeast Arkansas college town, a teacher described one suspect as a " 'yes sir, no sir' kind of kid." Another staffer said the youths' worst prior offenses were "talking too much." Another assured that they were not "troublemakers."Classmates, however, painted a different picture.
NEWS
June 16, 1991
Graveside services for Frank Darvis, of Ellicott City, were June 5 at the Calvary Cemetery in Youngstown, Ohio.Mr. Darvis died June 2at Methodist Hospital in Jonesboro, Ariz. He was visiting relatives in Jonesboro at the time of his death.A native of Campbell, Ohio, Mr. Darvis moved to Ellicott City four years ago after living in Michiganfor 18 years.He was a retiredsalesman for the McKelvey Furniture Co. and a former member of the First Pentecostal Church in Jonesboro.Mr. Darvis is survived by his wife, Jean Darvis; a son, Frank Darvis Jr. of Jonesboro; five daughters, Denise McIntyre of Ellicott City, Diane Livingston of Petaluma,Calif.
NEWS
March 31, 1998
An excerpt from a Sunday Kansas City Star editorial:The horrific execution-style murders at a middle school in Arkansas have people scrambling for blame.It's the media's fault!There is substantial violence in video games, television and movies, rock and rap music. But media can't take the full blame for what happened at Westside Middle School in Jonesboro, where 13-year-old and 11-year-old boys, both dressed in camouflage attire, were accused of killing four girls, a teacher and injuring at least 11 other people.
NEWS
April 2, 1998
AFTER THE tragedies in towns with such quaint-sounding names as Jonesboro, Paducah and Pearl, many parents sought reassurance in the belief that children killing children could not happen in their communities.Yet as victims of last week's school massacre were eulogized in Arkansas, Anne Arundel County police charged two ninth-graders at Old Mill High School in Millersville with involvement in a murder-for-hire scheme that turned into extortion.Yes, the unimaginable can happen in affluent communities and close to home.
NEWS
April 14, 1992
Elizabeth Blalock Blackford, who had been a teacher in Virginia and West Virginia and a resident of the Baltimore area since the early 1930s, died April 6 of heart failure at Church Hospital. She was 86.Mrs. Blackford, who lived on Weatherbee Road in Towson, taught chemistry at schools in Alexandria, Va., and Salem, W.Va., before her marriage to Chester Blackford. Mr. Blackford retired as a central office engineer for the Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. before his death in 1977.The former Elizabeth Blalock was a native of Culloden, Ga. She was reared in Jonesboro, Ga., and was a 1925 graduate of Agnes Scott College in Atlanta.
NEWS
April 28, 1998
ANOTHER small college town. Another shattered community. Another pubescent murder suspect wearing a vacant stare in the back seat of a patrol car.After two youths were charged in the slayings of a teacher and four classmates in Jonesboro, Ark., a month ago, the question was, "How could this happen?"But after another middle-schooler, witnesses say, shot a teacher in the head Friday, then walked coolly into a school dance to open fire, the question now becomes, "How can we stop this?"Andrew Wurst, 14, of Edinboro, Pa., who is charged in the homicide, had told others at James W. Parker Middle School that he was going to the dance to "kill some people."
NEWS
April 2, 1998
AFTER THE tragedies in towns with such quaint-sounding names as Jonesboro, Paducah and Pearl, many parents sought reassurance in the belief that children killing children could not happen in their communities.Yet as victims of last week's school massacre were eulogized in Arkansas, Anne Arundel County police charged two ninth-graders at Old Mill High School in Millersville with involvement in a murder-for-hire scheme that turned into extortion.Yes, the unimaginable can happen in affluent communities and close to home.
NEWS
By Froma Harrop | April 2, 1998
HOW could this happen in a nice place like Jonesboro?" the residents of this neighborly Arkansas town ask. "How could it happen here?" the media repeat, like well-trained parrots. As long as people keep asking this irrelevant question, they're not going to find out what happened.A town or city is not good or bad. It is a mere geographical designation, a stage set for the lives that families make for themselves. Moments after the gruesome ambush of schoolchildren by two classmates, 13 and 11 -- before the first word of the boys' biographies was typed -- social scientists knew what they were dealing with: The boys are the products of abuse or neglect.
NEWS
March 31, 1998
An excerpt from a Sunday Kansas City Star editorial:The horrific execution-style murders at a middle school in Arkansas have people scrambling for blame.It's the media's fault!There is substantial violence in video games, television and movies, rock and rap music. But media can't take the full blame for what happened at Westside Middle School in Jonesboro, where 13-year-old and 11-year-old boys, both dressed in camouflage attire, were accused of killing four girls, a teacher and injuring at least 11 other people.
NEWS
March 30, 1998
This is an excerpt of a Thursday Chicago Tribune editorial:Once again, the nation has been convulsed by a heinous act of violence apparently committed by a child. Two children, in fact, one of them 11 years old and the other 13.Somehow, the authorities say, the two boys acquired a small arsenal and used it Tuesday to shoot down 15 students and teachers at the Westside Middle School in Jonesboro, Ark. Four of those students and one of the teachers died as a result of their wounds.And while the origins of the guns used in the Jonesboro shootings remain unclear, the fact that Arkansas law permits children to own firearms suggests another question: Even by the most expansive reading of the Second Amendment, can the Founding Fathers have had 11- and 13-year-olds nursing schoolboy grievances in mind when they wrote that "the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed"?
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 29, 1998
JONESBORO, Ark. -- Shannon Wright, who threw herself into the path of a bullet to save her sixth-grade pupil, was remembered yesterday as a hero as the final victims of Tuesday's shooting spree at Westside Middle School were laid to rest.The 32-year-old teacher -- who leaves a husband and a 2-year-old son -- was memorialized at a packed service five miles from the scene of the bloody schoolyard ambush that claimed the lives of Wright and four young girls and injured 10 others.Services for 12-year-old Stephanie Johnson and 11-year-old Brittney Varner were held yesterday.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | March 28, 1998
Birmingham, Ala. Sept. 15, 1963. Four little girls.It was 35 years ago that Birmingham's 16th Street Baptist Church was bombed. Denise McNair, only 11 years old, and three Sunday school classmates -- Addie Mae Collins, Cynthia Wesley and Carole Robertson, all 14 -- were killed. All decent Americans were shocked, outraged and heartbroken by the act.Jonesboro, Ark. March 24, 1998. Four little girls.It was nearly a week ago that two boys sprayed a hail of bullets into their classmates and teachers outside Westside Middle School.
NEWS
April 28, 1998
ANOTHER small college town. Another shattered community. Another pubescent murder suspect wearing a vacant stare in the back seat of a patrol car.After two youths were charged in the slayings of a teacher and four classmates in Jonesboro, Ark., a month ago, the question was, "How could this happen?"But after another middle-schooler, witnesses say, shot a teacher in the head Friday, then walked coolly into a school dance to open fire, the question now becomes, "How can we stop this?"Andrew Wurst, 14, of Edinboro, Pa., who is charged in the homicide, had told others at James W. Parker Middle School that he was going to the dance to "kill some people."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | March 28, 1998
Birmingham, Ala. Sept. 15, 1963. Four little girls.It was 35 years ago that Birmingham's 16th Street Baptist Church was bombed. Denise McNair, only 11 years old, and three Sunday school classmates -- Addie Mae Collins, Cynthia Wesley and Carole Robertson, all 14 -- were killed. All decent Americans were shocked, outraged and heartbroken by the act.Jonesboro, Ark. March 24, 1998. Four little girls.It was nearly a week ago that two boys sprayed a hail of bullets into their classmates and teachers outside Westside Middle School.
NEWS
March 26, 1998
HOW DO YOU prevent tragedies such as the one that stunned Jonesboro, Ark., when two boys in fatigues ambushed their middle-school classmates and killed four girls and a teacher?Open your eyes.After the shooting in the northeast Arkansas college town, a teacher described one suspect as a " 'yes sir, no sir' kind of kid." Another staffer said the youths' worst prior offenses were "talking too much." Another assured that they were not "troublemakers."Classmates, however, painted a different picture.
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