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By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 14, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Enmeshed in the Kosovo conflict and refusing to appear distracted, President Clinton found himself confronted by yet another legal challenge yesterday, as Paula Corbin Jones' lawyers began tabulating the money they will seek as payment for Clinton's contempt of court.White House aides and Clinton allies insist that he will be forced to pay only nominal penalties to Jones to compensate her for "his willful failure" to tell her lawyers that he had had a sexual relationship with Monica Lewinsky and had been alone with her.In finding the president guilty Monday of civil contempt of court, U.S. District Judge Susan Webber Wright in Arkansas ordered Clinton to pay Jones "any reasonable expenses" related "to this matter."
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | February 2, 2010
Two Baltimore sisters, whose paraplegic mother died from neglect-related wounds shortly after being removed from their care, were sentenced to five years of probation Monday during an emotional three-hour hearing. "I don't think the defendants need to be imprisoned to deter them from repeating the conduct," Baltimore Circuit Judge David Ross said, the two women sobbing before him. "I think they are genuinely grieving the loss of their mother and that grief is encouraged by the presence of guilt in these proceedings."
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NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 22, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Lawyers for Paula Corbin Jones are considering asking a federal judge to assess President Clinton between $350,000 and $500,000 for contempt of court in Jones' sexual-harassment lawsuit, according to a source on her legal team.While that range is only "a rough estimate," according to the source, who refused to be identified, her attorneys are discussing a sizable claim as they move toward a May 3 deadline for submitting it.An assessment anywhere close to that range would be vigorously challenged by the president's attorneys, and if the judge endorsed it, a legal fight over her authority to punish the president could be in the offing, a White House legal source indicated.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | February 2, 2010
Two Baltimore sisters, whose paraplegic mother died from neglect-related wounds shortly after being removed from their care, were sentenced to five years of probation Monday during an emotional three-hour hearing. "I don't think the defendants need to be imprisoned to deter them from repeating the conduct," Baltimore Circuit Judge David Ross said, the two women sobbing before him. "I think they are genuinely grieving the loss of their mother and that grief is encouraged by the presence of guilt in these proceedings."
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 8, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Seeking a steep penalty against President Clinton for contempt of court, Paula Corbin Jones' lawyers asked a federal judge yesterday to assess $496,358.30 -- nearly $200,000 higher than an out-of-court proposal the president's attorneys rejected this week."This nation now awaits a vigorous response from the federal judiciary to Clinton's virulent attack on its integrity," Jones' legal team argued in a 155-page catalog of lawyers' fees and expenses that, they said, resulted directly from Clinton's false testimony in the Jones case.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 21, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Lawyers for Paula Corbin Jones vowed yesterday to continue to pursue an out-of-court settlement of her sexual misconduct case against President Clinton, and the president's attorney said he was waiting to hear further "to get all of this behind us."Each side's legal team spoke out in St. Paul, Minn., after a federal appeals court there explored whether to revive Jones' now-dismissed case and send it back to a federal judge to examine the evidence anew.All three judges on the panel of the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals took an active role in a hearing on Jones' appeal but gave few hints about how they were leaning.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 6, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Lawyers for Paula Jones want to reinterview another woman who says President Clinton made sexual advances toward her, lawyers with knowledge of Jones' sexual misconduct lawsuit against Clinton said.Judge Susan Webber Wright, who is presiding over Jones' lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Little Rock, Ark., is considering the request by Jones' lawyers that they be allowed to conduct a second deposition of the woman, Kathleen Willey.In a deposition on Jan. 10, Willey testified that Clinton made advances to her at the White House in 1993, said several people with knowledge of her testimony.
NEWS
January 31, 1998
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton and his lawyers are dealing with two significant legal challenges -- both aimed at him personally. One is a criminal investigation by Whitewater independent prosecutor Kenneth W. Starr. The other is a sexual misconduct lawsuit filed by former Arkansas state employee Paula Corbin Jones.Each has continued for about three years, and until lately they were totally independent. Now, they seem closely linked and this week actually overlapped. The Sun's legal reporter Lyle Denniston assesses the implications.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff writers Susan Baer and Carl M. Cannon contributed to this article | March 21, 1998
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's lawyers, escalating their public and courtroom battle with Paula Corbin Jones and her attorneys, accused them yesterday of manufacturing evidence to bolster her sexual misconduct case against the president.Responding to the Jones side's outpouring of documents last week accusing Clinton of numerous sexual exploits and of orchestrating a "vast enterprise" to obstruct the case, Clinton's attorneys said most of those documents were intended to "taint" a trial by making it impossible to find an unbiased jury.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 1, 1998
WASHINGTON -- After weeks of headline-grabbing legal filings by both sides in the Paula Corbin Jones case, the federal judge overseeing the case yesterday ordered them both to knock it off.U.S. District Judge Susan Webber Wright issued an order saying she cannot ignore that lawyers for both President Clinton and Jones have "filed a number of contentious pleadings and have perhaps engaged in activities in violation of court orders."Specifically, lawyers for Jones and Clinton have exchanged a tit-for-tat series of pleadings that made public scandalous claims about the president and his alleged sexual liaisons and raised questions about his accusers.
SPORTS
By THE NEW YORK TIMES | May 26, 2004
SAN FRANCISCO - Lawyers for sprinter Marion Jones continued their offensive yesterday in an attempt to clear her name in the BALCO steroids case, providing and discounting documentary evidence acquired by anti-doping experts that could be used to bar her from the Olympics. Jones' representatives showed copies to The New York Times of several negative urine tests and a blood test purportedly belonging to her, a check written to BALCO'S founder, a ledger that seemed to list test results and a calendar bearing Jones' initials that appeared to contain code letters for prohibited performance-enhancing substances.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 22, 1999
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's legal team argued yesterday that he should have to pay $33,737, at most, for contempt of court in the Paula Corbin Jones case -- less than 7 percent of the amount that her lawyers have demanded.Clinton's lawyers said he should be required to pay only $12,316 -- less than 3 cents for each dollar sought. As calculated by the president's lawyers, the lower amount is how much Jones' side was forced to spend as a result of Clinton's contempt of court.The amount might be pushed as high as $33,737, the president's lawyers said, if the Jones lawyers' claims are interpreted more liberally.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 8, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Seeking a steep penalty against President Clinton for contempt of court, Paula Corbin Jones' lawyers asked a federal judge yesterday to assess $496,358.30 -- nearly $200,000 higher than an out-of-court proposal the president's attorneys rejected this week."This nation now awaits a vigorous response from the federal judiciary to Clinton's virulent attack on its integrity," Jones' legal team argued in a 155-page catalog of lawyers' fees and expenses that, they said, resulted directly from Clinton's false testimony in the Jones case.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 5, 1999
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's lawyers spurned a proposal by Paula Corbin Jones' lawyers this week that he pay $300,000 as a penalty for contempt of court, thus leaving it to the judge in the case to settle on a figure.Despite the rejection of their proposal, Jones' lawyers said yesterday that they may still ask U.S. District Judge Susan Webber Wright to award them that much when they submit an itemized billing of expenses Friday.Wright ruled last month that Clinton had committed contempt of court for giving "false, misleading and evasive answers that were designed to obstruct the judicial process" in Jones' sexual-misconduct lawsuit.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 22, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Lawyers for Paula Corbin Jones are considering asking a federal judge to assess President Clinton between $350,000 and $500,000 for contempt of court in Jones' sexual-harassment lawsuit, according to a source on her legal team.While that range is only "a rough estimate," according to the source, who refused to be identified, her attorneys are discussing a sizable claim as they move toward a May 3 deadline for submitting it.An assessment anywhere close to that range would be vigorously challenged by the president's attorneys, and if the judge endorsed it, a legal fight over her authority to punish the president could be in the offing, a White House legal source indicated.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 14, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Enmeshed in the Kosovo conflict and refusing to appear distracted, President Clinton found himself confronted by yet another legal challenge yesterday, as Paula Corbin Jones' lawyers began tabulating the money they will seek as payment for Clinton's contempt of court.White House aides and Clinton allies insist that he will be forced to pay only nominal penalties to Jones to compensate her for "his willful failure" to tell her lawyers that he had had a sexual relationship with Monica Lewinsky and had been alone with her.In finding the president guilty Monday of civil contempt of court, U.S. District Judge Susan Webber Wright in Arkansas ordered Clinton to pay Jones "any reasonable expenses" related "to this matter."
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 22, 1999
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's legal team argued yesterday that he should have to pay $33,737, at most, for contempt of court in the Paula Corbin Jones case -- less than 7 percent of the amount that her lawyers have demanded.Clinton's lawyers said he should be required to pay only $12,316 -- less than 3 cents for each dollar sought. As calculated by the president's lawyers, the lower amount is how much Jones' side was forced to spend as a result of Clinton's contempt of court.The amount might be pushed as high as $33,737, the president's lawyers said, if the Jones lawyers' claims are interpreted more liberally.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 5, 1999
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's lawyers spurned a proposal by Paula Corbin Jones' lawyers this week that he pay $300,000 as a penalty for contempt of court, thus leaving it to the judge in the case to settle on a figure.Despite the rejection of their proposal, Jones' lawyers said yesterday that they may still ask U.S. District Judge Susan Webber Wright to award them that much when they submit an itemized billing of expenses Friday.Wright ruled last month that Clinton had committed contempt of court for giving "false, misleading and evasive answers that were designed to obstruct the judicial process" in Jones' sexual-misconduct lawsuit.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 13, 1999
WASHINGTON -- A federal judge in Arkansas found President Clinton in contempt of court yesterday for giving "intentionally false" testimony last year when he told Paula Corbin Jones' lawyers that he did not have "sexual relations" with Monica Lewinsky -- and could not even recall being alone with her.The ruling -- the first time a president has been found in contempt of court -- branded the only elected president ever to be impeached with yet another blemish...
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 5, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Paula Corbin Jones will receive $200,000 from the money President Clinton paid to settle her sexual-misconduct lawsuit, under a deal made yesterday by several groups of lawyers who had represented her.Clinton and Jones agreed in November to settle her case out of court, after a judge had dismissed it and she began pursuing an appeal, and Clinton paid an agreed $850,000 to end the lawsuit. There was no apology involved, although earlier Jones had insisted on one.Since then, an increasingly bitter fight had broken out among the lawyers who had handled her case at various stages, with competing fee claims along with charges of malpractice and bad faith traded back and forth.
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