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By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2005
Splendid Solution: Jonas Salk and the Conquest of Polio By Jeffrey Kluger. G.P. Putnam's Sons. 373 pages. $25.95. Polio: An American Story By David M. Oshinsky. Oxford University Press. 342 pages. $30. For children growing up in the first half of the 20th century, there was hardly a scarier notion than being trapped in an iron lung. Flat on their backs, imprisoned in giant barrels that enclosed everything but the head and the feet, iron-lung kids could do little but stare at the ceiling and listen to the disturbing sound of air whooshing in and out, 21,000 times a day. Leg braces, wheelchairs and crutches were other symbols of the day. So were closed swimming pools, shuttered theaters and quarantine signs slapped on homes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2005
Splendid Solution: Jonas Salk and the Conquest of Polio By Jeffrey Kluger. G.P. Putnam's Sons. 373 pages. $25.95. Polio: An American Story By David M. Oshinsky. Oxford University Press. 342 pages. $30. For children growing up in the first half of the 20th century, there was hardly a scarier notion than being trapped in an iron lung. Flat on their backs, imprisoned in giant barrels that enclosed everything but the head and the feet, iron-lung kids could do little but stare at the ceiling and listen to the disturbing sound of air whooshing in and out, 21,000 times a day. Leg braces, wheelchairs and crutches were other symbols of the day. So were closed swimming pools, shuttered theaters and quarantine signs slapped on homes.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 6, 2002
The March of Dimes will award a $250,000 prize tonight to two biologists whose work has helped design new treatments for birth defects and other disorders. Dr. Seymour Benzer, 80, a professor of neuroscience at California Institute of Technology, is considered one of the world's leading biologists. In studies using the fruit fly as a model, Benzer revealed the fundamental mechanisms behind eye development and the genetics of circadian rhythm (the body's "internal clock") and discovered genes that control behavior, learning and memory.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 6, 2002
The March of Dimes will award a $250,000 prize tonight to two biologists whose work has helped design new treatments for birth defects and other disorders. Dr. Seymour Benzer, 80, a professor of neuroscience at California Institute of Technology, is considered one of the world's leading biologists. In studies using the fruit fly as a model, Benzer revealed the fundamental mechanisms behind eye development and the genetics of circadian rhythm (the body's "internal clock") and discovered genes that control behavior, learning and memory.
FEATURES
September 7, 2001
Editor's note: Sadly, USA Today has decided to drop CNN talk show host Larry King's long-running column later this month, calling it a casualty of a redesign of the paper. Fortunately for King fans, The Sun's Arthur Hirsch and David Folkenflik have obtained a draft believed to be his final submission. Although we cannot vouch for its authenticity, it is printed here for posterity: Can Omar Vizquel play shortstop or what? ... For my money, the Theory of Evolution still holds up ... Tellya what, Ella Fitzgerald, may she rest in peace, could sing at my birthday party anytime ... Ever notice how copy machine repair guys always wear short-sleeve dress shirts?
NEWS
By Newsday | June 5, 1993
As researchers gather in Berlin for the Ninth International Conference on AIDS, many see growing evidence that once-promising approaches to fighting the disease may be useless or even harmful.Emerging new knowledge about the AIDS virus is making it harder to decide how to treat infected people, they say, and raising fears that use of AZT and other anti-viral drugs may be promoting more virulent strains of the virus."I'm not at all sure what to give my patients, when to give it, how to combine drugs, or which patients are most likely to benefit from what treatments," Dr. Paul Volberding, a leading U.S. AIDS physician, told colleagues last month at a Harvard AIDS Institute gathering.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Staff Writer | June 29, 1995
With "Pocahontas" a huge hit, it's only a matter of time before these historical figures grace the big screen:* "Betsy Ross" -- She's hot and looking for love! Sexy Betsy (Shannen Doherty) is an 18th-century seamstress trapped in a ho-hum marriage. But when clueless hubby John Ross (David Hyde Pierce) is kicked in the head by a mule and suffers amnesia, she embarks on a torrid affair with handsome Gen. George Washington (Richard Gere), who asks her to sew the first official U.S. flag.There's just one catch: She has 24 hours to do it, or else a renegade colonel (Christopher Walken)
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | December 16, 1999
NEW YORK -- I loved President Clinton's answer at his recent press conference when he was asked whom he believed was the man of the century. He immediately named the same person I would have chosen: Franklin D. Roosevelt.For a writer, lists of the best or the worst are the last refuge of a scoundrel. But for a reader they are fun; they take less time (and thinking), but they get across ideas or points in a wonderfully direct way. Whether it is baseball players, politicians or books, I find it impossible to resist the things -- even though we are in the middle of a blizzard of them as our century and millennium come to an end.So, my mind wandered, as it does too often, and I found myself making a mental list of the top 10 Americans of the 20th century.
NEWS
May 4, 1992
Lee Salk, 65, a renowned child psychologist, author of eight LTC books on family relationships, and brother of polio vaccine inventor Jonas Salk, died of a heart attack Saturday in New York. He was the author of the books "How To Raise A Human Being," "What Every Child Would Like His Parents To Know," "Preparing For Parenthood," "What Every Child Would Like Parents To Know About Divorce," "Dear Dr. Salk," "Ask Dr. Salk," and "My Father, My Son: Intimate Relationships." Another, "Familyhood, Nurturing the Values That Matter," is to be published in August.
NEWS
April 15, 2005
Well into the 1950s, polio was still the mysterious virus that had crippled President Franklin D. Roosevelt, killed thousands of other people and confined thousands more, mostly children, to coffinlike "iron lung" respirators. But 50 years ago this week, scientists announced that a much-anticipated polio vaccine developed by University of Pittsburgh researcher Jonas Salk was safe and effective. Within a week, the first truckloads of Salk's vaccine arrived in Baltimore and health officials began vaccinating 140,000 children across Maryland.
FEATURES
September 7, 2001
Editor's note: Sadly, USA Today has decided to drop CNN talk show host Larry King's long-running column later this month, calling it a casualty of a redesign of the paper. Fortunately for King fans, The Sun's Arthur Hirsch and David Folkenflik have obtained a draft believed to be his final submission. Although we cannot vouch for its authenticity, it is printed here for posterity: Can Omar Vizquel play shortstop or what? ... For my money, the Theory of Evolution still holds up ... Tellya what, Ella Fitzgerald, may she rest in peace, could sing at my birthday party anytime ... Ever notice how copy machine repair guys always wear short-sleeve dress shirts?
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | December 16, 1999
NEW YORK -- I loved President Clinton's answer at his recent press conference when he was asked whom he believed was the man of the century. He immediately named the same person I would have chosen: Franklin D. Roosevelt.For a writer, lists of the best or the worst are the last refuge of a scoundrel. But for a reader they are fun; they take less time (and thinking), but they get across ideas or points in a wonderfully direct way. Whether it is baseball players, politicians or books, I find it impossible to resist the things -- even though we are in the middle of a blizzard of them as our century and millennium come to an end.So, my mind wandered, as it does too often, and I found myself making a mental list of the top 10 Americans of the 20th century.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Staff Writer | June 29, 1995
With "Pocahontas" a huge hit, it's only a matter of time before these historical figures grace the big screen:* "Betsy Ross" -- She's hot and looking for love! Sexy Betsy (Shannen Doherty) is an 18th-century seamstress trapped in a ho-hum marriage. But when clueless hubby John Ross (David Hyde Pierce) is kicked in the head by a mule and suffers amnesia, she embarks on a torrid affair with handsome Gen. George Washington (Richard Gere), who asks her to sew the first official U.S. flag.There's just one catch: She has 24 hours to do it, or else a renegade colonel (Christopher Walken)
NEWS
By Newsday | June 5, 1993
As researchers gather in Berlin for the Ninth International Conference on AIDS, many see growing evidence that once-promising approaches to fighting the disease may be useless or even harmful.Emerging new knowledge about the AIDS virus is making it harder to decide how to treat infected people, they say, and raising fears that use of AZT and other anti-viral drugs may be promoting more virulent strains of the virus."I'm not at all sure what to give my patients, when to give it, how to combine drugs, or which patients are most likely to benefit from what treatments," Dr. Paul Volberding, a leading U.S. AIDS physician, told colleagues last month at a Harvard AIDS Institute gathering.
NEWS
February 24, 1996
Samuel M. Wishik, 89, who helped devise family planning and health programs in 65 countries and retired in 1978 as professor emeritus of public health at Columbia University, died Monday in San Diego.In 1951, the University of Pittsburgh's Graduate School of Public Health appointed him founding chairman of the department of maternal and child health. He eventually became an associate dean and worked closely with Dr. Jonas Salk, who developed a vaccine to prevent polio, and with Dr. Benjamin Spock, the pediatrician and writer of books on child care.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 6, 2002
The March of Dimes will award a $250,000 prize tonight to two biologists whose work has helped design treatments for birth defects and other disorders. Dr. Seymour Benzer, 80, a professor of neuroscience at California Institute of Technology, is considered one of the world's leading biologists. In studies using the fruit fly as a model, Benzer revealed the fundamental mechanisms behind eye development and the genetics of circadian rhythm (the body's "internal clock") and discovered genes that control behavior, learning and memory.
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