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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 14, 1999
A Baltimore peace activist who is on probation for defacing a nuclear submarine in Maine was arrested by federal marshals yesterday and charged with violating probation by returning to Jonah House, a residence for Catholic Worker peace activists in West Baltimore. The arrest of Susan Crane, 55, who had also been ordered to relocate to Maine, occurred a month after she and other peace activists protested the probation terms outside federal probation offices here. Crane, who was released later yesterday in the custody of city probation officials, said in an interview that she will voluntarily return to Maine on Monday.
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NEWS
February 22, 2014
I was in Knoxville, Tenn., recently to support the Transform Now Plowshares activists during their sentencing hearing ("Activists sentenced for weapons site break-in," Feb. 19). Unfortunately, the news brief published in The Sun was just two sentences long. The note did not even list the names of the members of the disarmament group: Sister Megan Rice, Greg Boertje-Obed and Michael Walli. Mr. Boertje-Obed lived for many years at Baltimore's Jonah House, and the other two visited the community on several occasions.
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NEWS
February 22, 2014
I was in Knoxville, Tenn., recently to support the Transform Now Plowshares activists during their sentencing hearing ("Activists sentenced for weapons site break-in," Feb. 19). Unfortunately, the news brief published in The Sun was just two sentences long. The note did not even list the names of the members of the disarmament group: Sister Megan Rice, Greg Boertje-Obed and Michael Walli. Mr. Boertje-Obed lived for many years at Baltimore's Jonah House, and the other two visited the community on several occasions.
NEWS
By Antero Pietila and Antero Pietila,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2004
Philip Berrigan's grave sits inside an overgrown West Baltimore cemetery, giving inspiration to members of Jonah House who continue to protest war, violence and U.S. military spending from a house they built there. Eight years ago, Jonah House's war resisters, led by Berrigan and his wife, Elizabeth McAlister, became the official caretakers of St. Peter's graveyard, the final resting place of former parishioners of St. Peter the Apostle Roman Catholic Church, at Hollins and Poppleton streets.
NEWS
By Jim Haner and Jim Haner,SUN STAFF | July 5, 1996
Philip Berrigan and 25 peace activists -- including two toddlers and his 14-year-old daughter, Kathleen -- breached the security perimeter of the super secret National Security Agency (NSA) at Fort Meade yesterday to protest its role as "the brains of the military death machine."But they couldn't get themselves arrested.And their blizzard of press releases the night before didn't attract a single TV van.And, perhaps worst of all for this platoon of veteran protesters -- many of whom have done serious prison time over confrontations with cops and soldiers -- their grievances were fielded by a public relations man."
NEWS
January 2, 1991
Four antiwar protesters, including two from Jonah House in Baltimore, were to appear today in U.S. District Court in Syracuse, N.Y., on charges connected to vandalism of two planes and a runway at Griffiss Air Force Base in Rome, N.Y.Capt. Barney Welch, of the 416th Bombardment Wing at Griffiss, said the protesters splattered paint on a B-52G bomber, poured blood on a KC-135 Stratotanker, caused minor damage to the bomber's external fuel tank with a hammer and damaged a runway with an ax after gaining unauthorized access to the airbase at 6:20 a.m. yesterday.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | April 14, 1999
For the Catholic Worker peace activists who live there, West Baltimore's Jonah House is a place of community, prayer and good works, but to federal probation officials, it is a place of crime.Two former members of the Jonah House community, Susan Crane and Michele Naar Obed, have returned there in defiance of the U.S. Department of Probation, which ordered them not to live in the house after their release from federal prison, where they served terms for civil disobedience.About 20 people, including Crane and Obed, protested yesterday outside the downtown building that houses the federal probation offices, demanding that the probation terms be changed.
NEWS
By Antero Pietila and Antero Pietila,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2004
Philip Berrigan's grave sits inside an overgrown West Baltimore cemetery, giving inspiration to members of Jonah House who continue to protest war, violence and U.S. military spending from a house they built there. Eight years ago, Jonah House's war resisters, led by Berrigan and his wife, Elizabeth McAlister, became the official caretakers of St. Peter's graveyard, the final resting place of former parishioners of St. Peter the Apostle Roman Catholic Church, at Hollins and Poppleton streets.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | September 21, 2001
The 77-year-old peace activist Philip F. Berrigan was immediately shifted into solitary confinement at a federal penitentiary Sept. 11 when terrorists crashed hijacked airliners into the Pentagon and World Trade Center. Berrigan was among a number of "high-profile" inmates segregated from the general population in federal prisons across the nation, according to Internet messages received Wednesday at Jonah House, the Roman Catholic anti-war community that Berrigan helped found in Baltimore nearly 30 years ago. "Phil's in lockdown," said Elizabeth McAlister, Berrigan's wife, who is also a founder of Jonah House.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | April 20, 1999
In the warm, comfortable living room of Jonah House, the "community of conscience" he calls home, 75-year-old Philip Berrigan greets a visitor, then settles back into a rocking chair. He looks for all the world like a fellow ready to simply sit and rock and whittle. He's not.Berrigan has spent half a lifetime fighting for what he calls "peace and justice." He's preached, protested, demonstrated and been arrested in myriad actions against war and nuclear weapons. He has no plans to stop now. Barely five months off a two-year prison stretch he did for an anti-war protest, what Berrigan wants to talk about this day is a demonstration that could land him right back in the federal pen.In the morning, he'll be out in front of a federal office building, protesting on behalf of members of the Jonah House community who have been barred from returning home by the federal probation system.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 14, 1999
A Baltimore peace activist who is on probation for defacing a nuclear submarine in Maine was arrested by federal marshals yesterday and charged with violating probation by returning to Jonah House, a residence for Catholic Worker peace activists in West Baltimore. The arrest of Susan Crane, 55, who had also been ordered to relocate to Maine, occurred a month after she and other peace activists protested the probation terms outside federal probation offices here. Crane, who was released later yesterday in the custody of city probation officials, said in an interview that she will voluntarily return to Maine on Monday.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | April 14, 1999
For the Catholic Worker peace activists who live there, West Baltimore's Jonah House is a place of community, prayer and good works, but to federal probation officials, it is a place of crime.Two former members of the Jonah House community, Susan Crane and Michele Naar Obed, have returned there in defiance of the U.S. Department of Probation, which ordered them not to live in the house after their release from federal prison, where they served terms for civil disobedience.About 20 people, including Crane and Obed, protested yesterday outside the downtown building that houses the federal probation offices, demanding that the probation terms be changed.
NEWS
By Jim Haner and Jim Haner,SUN STAFF | July 5, 1996
Philip Berrigan and 25 peace activists -- including two toddlers and his 14-year-old daughter, Kathleen -- breached the security perimeter of the super secret National Security Agency (NSA) at Fort Meade yesterday to protest its role as "the brains of the military death machine."But they couldn't get themselves arrested.And their blizzard of press releases the night before didn't attract a single TV van.And, perhaps worst of all for this platoon of veteran protesters -- many of whom have done serious prison time over confrontations with cops and soldiers -- their grievances were fielded by a public relations man."
NEWS
January 2, 1991
Four antiwar protesters, including two from Jonah House in Baltimore, were to appear today in U.S. District Court in Syracuse, N.Y., on charges connected to vandalism of two planes and a runway at Griffiss Air Force Base in Rome, N.Y.Capt. Barney Welch, of the 416th Bombardment Wing at Griffiss, said the protesters splattered paint on a B-52G bomber, poured blood on a KC-135 Stratotanker, caused minor damage to the bomber's external fuel tank with a hammer and damaged a runway with an ax after gaining unauthorized access to the airbase at 6:20 a.m. yesterday.
NEWS
By From staff reports | July 30, 1999
In Baltimore CountyEx-office manager accused of embezzling $154,000 from firmTOWSON -- A former office manager of a Timonium-based insurance brokerage has been charged with embezzling $154,000 from the company.Dorothy K. Hofstetter, 60, of New Freedom, Pa., was charged in Baltimore County Circuit Court with felony theft Tuesday. She is accused of stealing money from her former employer, Brokerage Insurance Services Inc. The charge stems from an investigation by the attorney general's office and the fraud division of the Maryland Insurance Administration.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN REPORTER | September 27, 2006
WASHINGTON --The Rev. Andrew Foster Connors remained calm yesterday as a police officer put his hands in white plastic handcuffs and searched his pockets after he crossed a police line outside the U.S. Capitol. Less than an hour later, the Rev. Roger Scott Powers was also led away in handcuffs from the interfaith demonstration against the war in Iraq in the atrium of the Hart Senate Office Building. The two Presbyterian ministers from Baltimore were among 71 people who were detained yesterday as they protested the war in Iraq - and continued Baltimore's long tradition of civil disobedience against wars.
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