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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
There was Wendell Pierce last Sunday night, sitting at a bar, pounding down drink after drink and getting kind of emotional as he talked about how messed up things had gotten in his life. Shades of Bunk Moreland, of “The Wire,” to be sure. Only instead of Dominic West as Jimmy McNulty matching him drink for drink, it was Liev Schreiber as Ray Donovan sitting next to him. Still, the character, Ronald Keith, a parole officer in Showtime's “Ray Donovan” series, was played just as winningly by Pierce.
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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
There was Wendell Pierce last Sunday night, sitting at a bar, pounding down drink after drink and getting kind of emotional as he talked about how messed up things had gotten in his life. Shades of Bunk Moreland, of “The Wire,” to be sure. Only instead of Dominic West as Jimmy McNulty matching him drink for drink, it was Liev Schreiber as Ray Donovan sitting next to him. Still, the character, Ronald Keith, a parole officer in Showtime's “Ray Donovan” series, was played just as winningly by Pierce.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | January 13, 2002
Before the lights went down for the coming attractions, a trivia blurb on the screen reported that the most filmed character in movie history is Dracula, which at the moment seems inaccurate. At the moment, it seems to be Howard Cosell. The feature film was Ali, with Will Smith as Muhammad Ali and Jon Voight as half of a Cosellathon that will be playing in theaters and television tomorrow night. The other half is John Turturro in Monday Night Mayhem, a TV movie (TNT, 9 p.m.) dramatizing the perpetual ego-wrangling behind the scenes during Cosell's time on ABC's Monday Night Football.
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By Los Angeles Times | March 16, 2009
Series Gossip Girl: : Serena (Blake Lively) develops a crush on the director of the school play. (8 p.m., WNUV-Channel 54) 24: : Jack's (Kiefer Sutherland) latest adversary (Jon Voight) emerges as the fight to avert more terror attacks continues. (9 p.m., WBFF-Channel 45) Kyle XY: : A horrified Kyle (Matt Dallas) vows to stop Cassidy and Latnok when he learns of their plans for the mass production of more super-children in the finale of the science fiction series. (9 p.m., ABC Family)
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By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,Orlando Sentinel | August 3, 2007
Bratz: The Movie, a live-action film based on a set of dolls who have also inspired assorted animated direct-to-video releases, isn't all that. With those origins, it never was going to be much. But OMG! For a formulaic comedy about shallow, shopping-obsessed teenagers, it's about twice as good as it has any right to be. The four bratty fashion plates are distinct characters. They have personal issues to overcome - stage fright, working-class money problems, suffocating parental expectations, egoism.
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By Chris Hewitt and Chris Hewitt,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | October 10, 1997
"Most Wanted."Could the title be more generic? More important, could the movie?I think not. It's one of those "Fugitive" knockoffs with an innocent guy who can't go to the cops until he figures out who really did it. The faux-gitive in this case is Keenen Ivory Wayans, a marksman who is set up for the murder of the first lady and goes underground. While he's there, he seeks the truth with the help of a doctor (Jill Hennessy), who cannot say hello without sounding phony.The plot combines elements of the JFK assassination and the relationship between Bill and Hillary Rodham Clinton with inane dialogue, laughable "action" sequences and characterizations so dopey that a woman behind me at a screening shouted, "How stupid is this person?"
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1999
Northern Ireland must be a mess, if a guy like Martin Cahill can become a hero there.Nicknamed the General, the real-life Cahill grew up in the Dublin slum of Hollyfield to become a notorious thief who stole not for a cause, or because he had to, but because he wanted to -- the better to get that big house, gain the loyalty of his friends and taunt all the authority figures who picked on him when he was growing up.Director John Boorman's "The General" chronicles...
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By Kevin Crust and Kevin Crust,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 28, 2004
A follow-up to the 1999 mishap Baby Geniuses, the new Superbabies: Baby Geniuses 2 may quite easily put an end to any discussion of what is the worst theatrical release of this year. The culprits are once again producer Steven Paul and director Bob Clark. The movie is so bad that Sony Entertainment revived the long-dormant Triumph Films to release it, presumably to avoid putting the mothership's logo in the ads. Further burying a conceit the Look Who's Talking movies ran into the ground more than a decade ago, Superbabies holds that infants have a language only they can comprehend.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 15, 1999
If you think you know what's going to happen next in "Varsity Blues," you do.An astonishingly predictable film about a Texas town that views high school quarterback as the most important job in the world, and the one kid in town who refuses to buy into that mind-set, "Varsity Blues" is most notable for giving Jon Voight the chance to chew all the scenery his incisors can reach.It also offers TV's James Van Der Beek ("Dawson's Creek") a shot at big-screen stardom, but in a film that will hardly appeal to the teen-age girls who dominate his fan base.
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By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1997
Snakes. Why did it have to be snakes?Indiana Jones might ask that of "Anaconda." The answer is, it didn't. It could have been anything. "Velociraptor." "Shark." "Piranha." "Limbaugh." This is such a formula monster movie that it could have been made 40 years ago, without the computer-generated reptiles.Jennifer Lopez goes from "Selena" to snake bait as the star of this forlorn flick. She's a documentary director who joins up with guide Eric Stoltz and cameraman-rapper Ice Cube to locate and film a shy tribe in the Amazon jungle.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | November 26, 2008
Serious talent can overcome even the most hackneyed of movie plots, as Four Christmases proves. A surprisingly deft and sometimes hilarious variation on the well-worn "holidays+relatives=hell" story line (see Home for the Holidays, Christmas with the Kranks, Fred Claus, etc.), Four Christmases works because of some genuinely funny setups, a pace that never dwells on one gag (or even one family) too long and a careful mix of slapstick and bawdy humor. But mostly, the film works because of the astonishing acting talent the filmmakers brought together to make it. No fewer than five Oscar winners - Reese Witherspoon, Robert Duvall, Sissy Spacek, Mary Steenburgen and Jon Voight - get to show their funny sides in the films.
FEATURES
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,Orlando Sentinel | August 3, 2007
Bratz: The Movie, a live-action film based on a set of dolls who have also inspired assorted animated direct-to-video releases, isn't all that. With those origins, it never was going to be much. But OMG! For a formulaic comedy about shallow, shopping-obsessed teenagers, it's about twice as good as it has any right to be. The four bratty fashion plates are distinct characters. They have personal issues to overcome - stage fright, working-class money problems, suffocating parental expectations, egoism.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 2, 2007
More so than any movie in recent memory, Transformers insists that audiences just go with it. Do that, and you might be surprised how much fun you'll have. Resist, and this probably wasn't a wise filmgoing choice in the first place. Opening tonight in some theaters and tomorrow everywhere else, the action flick has so much going for it - namely, the supremely cool spectacle of watching cars and trucks rearrange themselves into giant robots - that its very real problems are easy to overlook.
FEATURES
By Kevin Crust and Kevin Crust,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 28, 2004
A follow-up to the 1999 mishap Baby Geniuses, the new Superbabies: Baby Geniuses 2 may quite easily put an end to any discussion of what is the worst theatrical release of this year. The culprits are once again producer Steven Paul and director Bob Clark. The movie is so bad that Sony Entertainment revived the long-dormant Triumph Films to release it, presumably to avoid putting the mothership's logo in the ads. Further burying a conceit the Look Who's Talking movies ran into the ground more than a decade ago, Superbabies holds that infants have a language only they can comprehend.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 18, 2003
Holes, based on a beloved, award-winning children's book, is so faithful to its source that legions of schoolkids and their teachers will clasp it to their hearts. After all, it's a glorified set of illustrations that will extend, or at least not get in the way of, their original reading experience. Those who come to the movie cold will find it an exasperating assembly of brutal pedantry and whimsies, boasting far less charm or grace than even the first Harry Potter picture. It's partly a broad satire on teen boot camps: The hero, Stanley Yelnats (Shia LaBeouf)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | January 13, 2002
Before the lights went down for the coming attractions, a trivia blurb on the screen reported that the most filmed character in movie history is Dracula, which at the moment seems inaccurate. At the moment, it seems to be Howard Cosell. The feature film was Ali, with Will Smith as Muhammad Ali and Jon Voight as half of a Cosellathon that will be playing in theaters and television tomorrow night. The other half is John Turturro in Monday Night Mayhem, a TV movie (TNT, 9 p.m.) dramatizing the perpetual ego-wrangling behind the scenes during Cosell's time on ABC's Monday Night Football.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 2, 2007
More so than any movie in recent memory, Transformers insists that audiences just go with it. Do that, and you might be surprised how much fun you'll have. Resist, and this probably wasn't a wise filmgoing choice in the first place. Opening tonight in some theaters and tomorrow everywhere else, the action flick has so much going for it - namely, the supremely cool spectacle of watching cars and trucks rearrange themselves into giant robots - that its very real problems are easy to overlook.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 16, 2009
Series Gossip Girl: : Serena (Blake Lively) develops a crush on the director of the school play. (8 p.m., WNUV-Channel 54) 24: : Jack's (Kiefer Sutherland) latest adversary (Jon Voight) emerges as the fight to avert more terror attacks continues. (9 p.m., WBFF-Channel 45) Kyle XY: : A horrified Kyle (Matt Dallas) vows to stop Cassidy and Latnok when he learns of their plans for the mass production of more super-children in the finale of the science fiction series. (9 p.m., ABC Family)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1999
Northern Ireland must be a mess, if a guy like Martin Cahill can become a hero there.Nicknamed the General, the real-life Cahill grew up in the Dublin slum of Hollyfield to become a notorious thief who stole not for a cause, or because he had to, but because he wanted to -- the better to get that big house, gain the loyalty of his friends and taunt all the authority figures who picked on him when he was growing up.Director John Boorman's "The General" chronicles...
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 15, 1999
If you think you know what's going to happen next in "Varsity Blues," you do.An astonishingly predictable film about a Texas town that views high school quarterback as the most important job in the world, and the one kid in town who refuses to buy into that mind-set, "Varsity Blues" is most notable for giving Jon Voight the chance to chew all the scenery his incisors can reach.It also offers TV's James Van Der Beek ("Dawson's Creek") a shot at big-screen stardom, but in a film that will hardly appeal to the teen-age girls who dominate his fan base.
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