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By KEVIN COWHERD | November 4, 2004
GO AHEAD, Mr. or Ms. America, scrape that bumper sticker off the car. Pull up those lawn signs and toss them in the garbage. Throw out your Bush-Cheney or Kerry-Edwards buttons and the silly boater you were wearing when you stayed up late on Election Night, swilling too much chablis and shrieking at Wolf Blitzer and pulling for the red or blue candidate of your choice. Yes, the long national nightmare is over. We officially have a president. But the truth is, for most voters, the whole loud, ugly, rancorous campaign didn't end a moment too soon.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2010
When comedian Demetri Martin lived in New York, he liked to talk with his friends and fellow comedians about the idea of a body of work. Surveying the national comedy scene, Martin would see comics who were hugely popular, but he didn't think were all that funny, as well as hilarious comics toiling in obscurity. Martin felt the right way to put things in perspective wasn't to judge them based on success alone but all the work they'd done in their lifetime. "It always seemed that if you thought about the body of work, that was the best way to stay on track," Martin said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2010
The more I hear Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert talking about their rally scheduled for Saturday on Washington's National Mall, the more I wonder if there is anything that is not a laughing matter in our national life any more. Actually, laughter might be too active and committed a concept for the kind of consumers of humor that we have become, thanks in large part to TV comedians like David Letterman a generation ago and now Colbert and Stewart, where everything is irony and postmodern mockery.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,Sun Television Writer | April 20, 2003
For those who like to see television take anti-war figures seriously -- or at least somewhat seriously -- there's really been only one sure place to turn in recent weeks: Comedy Central's The Daily Show. Comedian Chris Rock said recently on the faux news program that reporters from genuine news outlets had been trying to trip him up on his political stance. "No, I'm not really for the war," Rock says he replies, and then gets told -- "So, you're against the troops." "I didn't say that," Rock explodes with a mischievous grin, then tells Daily Show anchor Jon Stewart, "There's this weird McCarthyism right now."
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2001
It was with nothing less than great irony that Madonna kicked off last night's Grammy Awards ceremony with a performance of her hit "Music," with its la-la-land, love-fest lyrics like "Music makes the people come together." The ultimate pop diva even emphasized the air of all cultures and people coming together by stepping out of a flashy, silver limo that could have fit into many a Jay-Z music video. And she even incorporated another genre in her act when she had the potty-mouthed, 13-year-old rapper Lil Bow Wow open the limo door for her. However, just moments before Madonna's let's-all-hold-hands act, hundreds had gathered outside Staples Center in Los Angeles to protest the four Grammy nominations of controversial rap star Eminem.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | December 6, 2000
I have a new hero, and his name is Andy Kindler. Kindler is a commentator for Comedy Central's "The Daily Show," the half-hour mock newsmagazine on weeknights at 11 that provides the sharpest satire to be found on television. Imagine my delight last week when ostensible anchor Jon Stewart - a comic who won my affection when he singed the fawning coverage of Joe Lieberman with the words "Senator, you had me at `Shalom' " - provided the following lead-in: "Many people feel that the landscape of daytime talk shows is too highbrow, too inaccessible, for the mainstream audience."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | June 24, 2011
President Barack Obama's speech on Afghanistan -- in which he said he'd remove a minority of troops there by next summer -- is being met with criticism from both the right and left.  Hawkish politicians want to keep all the troops there as long as the generals desire (which could be forever) and those opposed to the war want to bring the troops home immediately.  Comedian Jon Stewart joined the chorus of critics last night, when he ripped Obama's plan for not bringing the troops home quickly enough.  "That's it?"
NEWS
June 23, 2011
Regarding Jon Stewart's swipe at Chris Wallace over whether Fox News viewers are misinformed: As much as the media is blamed for spreading lies and misinformation, people will believe what they want to. More often than not, what they want to believe is shaped by their immediate surroundings, their parents, churches, schools, friends and life experiences. So good luck trying to tell Rep. Michelle Bachman that "intelligent design" is not intelligent, or Sen. John McCain that illegal immigrants aren't to blame for the recent fires in Arizona.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | August 10, 2011
Newsweek's crazy-eyes Michele Bachmann cover has been getting a lot of attention this week, especially from conservatives who are blasting the magazine for the unflattering image of the GOP frontrunner. (You've got to hand it to Newsweek editor Tina Brown. She knows how to stir up a controversy.)  Last night, liberal-leaning comedian Jon Stewart joined the Newsweek criticism, though not exactly for the same reasons that are making Republicans so upset.  "Newsweek, that's a s---y picture of Michele Bachmann," Stewart said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | June 20, 2011
Comedian Jon Stewart appeared on Fox News Sunday yesterday and participated in a somewhat heated (but relatively polite) exchange with host Chris Wallace.  It was a pretty good debate ( The Sun's venerated TV critic David Zurawik even got a shout-out) but both Stewart and Wallace were, in my opinion, somewhat wrong.  Stewart is partially wrong when he says that Fox News is "A biased organization, relentlessly promoting an ideological agenda under the rubric of being a news organization" -- and not only because he uses the word "rubric" instead of "guise.
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