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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | July 25, 1992
As a marketing concept, "Mom and Dad Save the World" is a complete catastrophe. It's a movie astutely engineered for an audience of zero.It has no big stars; it's too camp for the hip and too hip for the camp. It's too sophisticated for very young kids, and not not nearly sophisticated enough for teen-agers. It even honors a mom and a dad, those backward, groping, awkward figures of folly and dwindling authority. Only an idiot could love it.Naturally, I adored it.The movie is just loopy enough and manages to find just the right off-kilter tone and my expectations were just low enough TC (no pre-release screening for critics)
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By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2011
White-collar scandals come so quickly these days that if you don't work on Wall Street or inside the Beltway, it's difficult to distinguish between scoundrels. When you first hear the name " Jack Abramoff," you might think that he was the one who ripped off everyone from Elie Wiesel to Steven Spielberg. No, that was Bernie Madoff, the New York financier who amassed a fortune with a Ponzi scheme.. Abramoff is the Washington lobbyist who became notorious for ruthlessly overcharging American Indian tribes by scores of millions of dollars while currying support for their casinos.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 25, 1996
Oh, no! What is this? An image remake for Jon Lovitz? Does he think he's suddenly cool or something?Well, maybe. Lovitz, who's made a career playing delusional schlumphs and self-important nerd kings, puts in his appearance in a downtown hotel in the jet black of L.A. after 2 a.m. and the little out-of-the-way club bars like the Viper where only the hippest of the hip can get in to sip drinks so obscure Details doesn't know what's in them yet. Who's dressing...
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW & CHRIS KALTENBACH and MICHAEL SRAGOW & CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITICS | April 28, 2006
Capsules by Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach, except where noted. Full reviews at baltimoresun.com/movies. American Dreamz -- wants to be a wild satire of politics and pop culture. But it's really just a cornpone comedy for the age of big media, with the president (Dennis Quaid) as the global village idiot, a Simon Cowell-like reality show host (Hugh Grant) as the evil Lothario and the international TV audience as the denatured salt of the earth, able to get caught up in the spectacle of their fellow men and women aspiring to be stars.
FEATURES
By ROGER MOORE and ROGER MOORE,ORLANDO SENTINEL | April 7, 2006
Welcome to Adam Sandler World, a happy, stupid planet where director Dennis Dugan (Problem Child, Big Daddy) enjoys the status of a Hitchcock, and Sandler himself no longer needs to make an appearance. He can hire proxy Sandlers like David Spade (career ... OVER) and Jon Heder, who proves that his booger-and-bug-eating skills were ignored in Napoleon Dynamite. The Benchwarmers, the latest from Sand- ler's Happy Madison production banner, severely tests the maxim that "There's no such thing as a bad movie about baseball."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1998
TV shows have developed three ways of dealing with a cast member's death. Thankfully, tonight's season premiere of "NewsRadio" chooses the most appropriate -- and most difficult to pull off.The cast member is Phil Hartman, who earlier this year was apparently slain by his wife, who then killed herself. As the hopelessly vain Bill McNeal, Hartman was the show's cutting edge; without him, the show's writers have no ego to lampoon, no one to be this station's Ted Baxter. (That problem will be tackled Oct. 7, with the introduction of new cast member Jon Lovitz.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 25, 1996
Jon Lovitz is one of the moronz in the 'hood in "High School High," an otherwise routine parody of the inner-city soap opera. Lovitz's bumbling innocence and grandly delusional self-importance are so amusing that you want to like "High School High" more than it deserves.Lovitz plays one Richard C. Clark, the son of a prominent prep school principal, a young man raised to the highest standards of liberal education and hopeless impracticality. He seems to view reality through a fog of noblesse oblige, which makes him chump change to the rest of the world.
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By Lou Cedrone | October 17, 1990
''Mr. Destiny'' is little more than a redo of Frank Capra's ''It's A Wonderful Life.'' If you want to see the story done the right way, see the Capra version. If you want a pale imitation, try this one.The new film does have James Belushi. That's more than a small plus, but the material is so wan, so predictable, there is little the star can do with it.Belushi plays Larry Burrows, a 35-year-old businessman who regrets the day he missed that pitch and lost the high school championship. He is certain that if he had not struck out, his life would have been vastly different.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey MOVIES | July 25, 1992
ARTRemembrances of warPaul Kohl's "Why We Lost the War," a combination of poems about the Vietnam War and photographs of Civil War battlefields, jars us out of forgetfulness about Vietnam and about war. These, together with David Beaudouin's poems and Thea Osato's drawing/paintings from their book "The American Night Series," are among the best works in "Prose/Poetry -- Visual Arts Collaborative." Image-text combinations are hardly new, but this is apparently the first such show in Baltimore, and it's an excellent idea become worthwhile though quite uneven show.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2011
White-collar scandals come so quickly these days that if you don't work on Wall Street or inside the Beltway, it's difficult to distinguish between scoundrels. When you first hear the name " Jack Abramoff," you might think that he was the one who ripped off everyone from Elie Wiesel to Steven Spielberg. No, that was Bernie Madoff, the New York financier who amassed a fortune with a Ponzi scheme.. Abramoff is the Washington lobbyist who became notorious for ruthlessly overcharging American Indian tribes by scores of millions of dollars while currying support for their casinos.
FEATURES
By ROGER MOORE and ROGER MOORE,ORLANDO SENTINEL | April 7, 2006
Welcome to Adam Sandler World, a happy, stupid planet where director Dennis Dugan (Problem Child, Big Daddy) enjoys the status of a Hitchcock, and Sandler himself no longer needs to make an appearance. He can hire proxy Sandlers like David Spade (career ... OVER) and Jon Heder, who proves that his booger-and-bug-eating skills were ignored in Napoleon Dynamite. The Benchwarmers, the latest from Sand- ler's Happy Madison production banner, severely tests the maxim that "There's no such thing as a bad movie about baseball."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1998
TV shows have developed three ways of dealing with a cast member's death. Thankfully, tonight's season premiere of "NewsRadio" chooses the most appropriate -- and most difficult to pull off.The cast member is Phil Hartman, who earlier this year was apparently slain by his wife, who then killed herself. As the hopelessly vain Bill McNeal, Hartman was the show's cutting edge; without him, the show's writers have no ego to lampoon, no one to be this station's Ted Baxter. (That problem will be tackled Oct. 7, with the introduction of new cast member Jon Lovitz.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 25, 1996
Oh, no! What is this? An image remake for Jon Lovitz? Does he think he's suddenly cool or something?Well, maybe. Lovitz, who's made a career playing delusional schlumphs and self-important nerd kings, puts in his appearance in a downtown hotel in the jet black of L.A. after 2 a.m. and the little out-of-the-way club bars like the Viper where only the hippest of the hip can get in to sip drinks so obscure Details doesn't know what's in them yet. Who's dressing...
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 25, 1996
Jon Lovitz is one of the moronz in the 'hood in "High School High," an otherwise routine parody of the inner-city soap opera. Lovitz's bumbling innocence and grandly delusional self-importance are so amusing that you want to like "High School High" more than it deserves.Lovitz plays one Richard C. Clark, the son of a prominent prep school principal, a young man raised to the highest standards of liberal education and hopeless impracticality. He seems to view reality through a fog of noblesse oblige, which makes him chump change to the rest of the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | June 10, 1994
In "City Slickers II: The Legend of Curly's Gold," Billy Crystal returns as Mitch Robbins, who's compassionate, nurturing, decent, humane and caring.I hate that in a man, and I hate it even more in a movie.In fact, where the original was a comedy with a few disagreeable moments of male weepiness, "City Slickers II: The Legend of Curly's Gold" is a male weeper with a few agreeable moments of comedy.I suppose if your idea of movie fun is watching Crystal at his most sensitive, his antenna all jittery and his eyes all sloppy with the glycerine of empathy as he nurtures two sad sacks (Daniel Stern and Jon Lovitz)
FEATURES
By John Dorsey MOVIES | July 25, 1992
ARTRemembrances of warPaul Kohl's "Why We Lost the War," a combination of poems about the Vietnam War and photographs of Civil War battlefields, jars us out of forgetfulness about Vietnam and about war. These, together with David Beaudouin's poems and Thea Osato's drawing/paintings from their book "The American Night Series," are among the best works in "Prose/Poetry -- Visual Arts Collaborative." Image-text combinations are hardly new, but this is apparently the first such show in Baltimore, and it's an excellent idea become worthwhile though quite uneven show.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | June 10, 1994
In "City Slickers II: The Legend of Curly's Gold," Billy Crystal returns as Mitch Robbins, who's compassionate, nurturing, decent, humane and caring.I hate that in a man, and I hate it even more in a movie.In fact, where the original was a comedy with a few disagreeable moments of male weepiness, "City Slickers II: The Legend of Curly's Gold" is a male weeper with a few agreeable moments of comedy.I suppose if your idea of movie fun is watching Crystal at his most sensitive, his antenna all jittery and his eyes all sloppy with the glycerine of empathy as he nurtures two sad sacks (Daniel Stern and Jon Lovitz)
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW & CHRIS KALTENBACH and MICHAEL SRAGOW & CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITICS | April 28, 2006
Capsules by Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach, except where noted. Full reviews at baltimoresun.com/movies. American Dreamz -- wants to be a wild satire of politics and pop culture. But it's really just a cornpone comedy for the age of big media, with the president (Dennis Quaid) as the global village idiot, a Simon Cowell-like reality show host (Hugh Grant) as the evil Lothario and the international TV audience as the denatured salt of the earth, able to get caught up in the spectacle of their fellow men and women aspiring to be stars.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | July 25, 1992
As a marketing concept, "Mom and Dad Save the World" is a complete catastrophe. It's a movie astutely engineered for an audience of zero.It has no big stars; it's too camp for the hip and too hip for the camp. It's too sophisticated for very young kids, and not not nearly sophisticated enough for teen-agers. It even honors a mom and a dad, those backward, groping, awkward figures of folly and dwindling authority. Only an idiot could love it.Naturally, I adored it.The movie is just loopy enough and manages to find just the right off-kilter tone and my expectations were just low enough TC (no pre-release screening for critics)
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