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Jon Gruden

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By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2001
OAKLAND, Calif. - Jon Gruden looks younger than many of his players. When wide receiver Tim Brown first met him at the team's training facility, he walked right past Gruden - now in his third season as the Oakland Raiders' coach - thinking he was just another face in the crowd. Gruden, 37, does not have a gray hair on his blond head, is clean-shaven and, away from the sideline of a football game, is non-threatening. Maybe it was the look that made Gruden's players almost instantly feel comfortable around him. The team refers to him as Gruden, foregoing the customary "Coach" part.
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SPORTS
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2012
The ESPN "Monday Night Football" crew earned my respect before the game between the Baltimore Ravens and Cincinnati Bengals even started. It came during the pre-game moment of silence for former Ravens owner Art Modell . Placed at ground level, a camera shot the length of the field into the top of the stands to the left of one of the end zones. It was shooting into a yellow ball of setting sun that was seeping through the stands onto the field. The muted sun suffused the entire shot in a golden glow.
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NEWS
By Sam Farmer, Tribune newspapers | August 10, 2011
GEORGETOWN, Ky. — Jay Gruden has his older brother's voice, and their eyes have the same steely glint. Jay is bigger, has darker hair and more of a twisted smile than a sinister "Chucky" grimace. "Jon's more edgy, grouchier too. Meaner," said the younger Gruden, new offensive coordinator of the Cincinnati Bengals. "I'm a nice guy. I'm more laid-back. His tolerance level isn't as high as mine, and mine's pretty low. " Case in point: During an offensive meeting this week, one of the Bengals had the nerve to chomp on a mouthful of ice as Gruden was making a point.
NEWS
By Sam Farmer, Tribune newspapers | August 10, 2011
GEORGETOWN, Ky. — Jay Gruden has his older brother's voice, and their eyes have the same steely glint. Jay is bigger, has darker hair and more of a twisted smile than a sinister "Chucky" grimace. "Jon's more edgy, grouchier too. Meaner," said the younger Gruden, new offensive coordinator of the Cincinnati Bengals. "I'm a nice guy. I'm more laid-back. His tolerance level isn't as high as mine, and mine's pretty low. " Case in point: During an offensive meeting this week, one of the Bengals had the nerve to chomp on a mouthful of ice as Gruden was making a point.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | April 19, 1999
Eric Barton loved the vibes he received from Raiders coach Jon Gruden yesterday after Oakland selected the Maryland linebacker in the fifth round of the NFL draft."
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2002
It took more than a month to complete, reeling through fiasco after fiasco, but the Tampa Bay Buccaneers' clumsy coaching search finally ended yesterday when Jon Gruden agreed to replace Tony Dungy. Only after striking a deal with Oakland owner Al Davis were the Bucs able to pry Gruden loose from the Raiders. The price of getting the offensive-minded coach of their choice was extravagant: The Bucs will surrender four draft picks, including two first-rounders, to the Raiders over the next three years.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2003
SAN DIEGO - The Oakland Raiders descended on Southern California with a hush rather than in a huff. Heading into Super Bowl XXXVII - which is popularly being regarded as Gruden Bowl I - the AFC champions are putting a lid on any trash talking concerning their first meeting with their former coach. Whether it's veteran savvy or partially the truth, Oakland repeatedly declared no hostility toward Jon Gruden, who bolted from the Raiders to become coach of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers a year ago. These aren't the same bold-talking, swaggering Raiders from yesteryear.
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY and KEN MURRAY,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2004
When Butch Davis walked away from the Cleveland Browns last week, he left behind a trail of ill will forged by his four-year power grab. The more power Davis grabbed, the less effectively he wielded it. In the end, players tuned him out, management distrusted his decisions, and fans heaped their frustration on him. Consider the stunning rise and fall of Davis instructive in the long-held NFL policy of copying success. Teams can try to copy winning formulas, but rarely can they duplicate them.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER and RAY FRAGER,ray.frager@baltsun.com | February 20, 2009
Presenting another column in the same week when I was hit with the sports media notes franchise tag, which works out to be enough to pay for just basic cable - no Cathouse on HBO! - for about six months: * Talkers magazine, a radio trade publication, ranked the top 250 talk show hosts in the country. Jim Rome, whose long pauses and almost incomprehensible self-references are heard locally on Fox Sports 1370, was the highest-rated of the sports variety at No. 29. No Baltimore sports types made the list.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2003
SAN DIEGO - Jon Gruden bobbed and weaved all week, dodging questions about his Oakland Raiders past and the high tariff the Tampa Bay Buccaneers paid to get him. Last night, he finally answered Al Davis and the skeptics. Not in words, but in results. Yes, he was worth it. Worth every penny of the $8 million, worth each of the four draft picks the Bucs surrendered last February to Davis, Oakland's managing general partner. Gruden's underdog Bucs stung the Raiders for 34 straight points, then withstood a late Oakland charge to win Super Bowl XXXVII, 48-21, at Qualcomm Stadium.
SPORTS
By Sam Farmer | July 18, 2010
They were 10 miles apart this week, Jon Gruden in a Culver City, Calif., studio shooting his "Monday Night Football" intros and Sean Payton staying in a Hollywood hotel for both the ESPYs and to promote his new book. In many ways, though, Gruden and Payton are even closer than that. They are good friends and the only coaches ever to lead NFC South teams to Super Bowl victories. They also are separated in age by just four months, both were college quarterbacks (Gruden a backup at Dayton; Payton at Eastern Illinois)
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER and RAY FRAGER,ray.frager@baltsun.com | February 20, 2009
Presenting another column in the same week when I was hit with the sports media notes franchise tag, which works out to be enough to pay for just basic cable - no Cathouse on HBO! - for about six months: * Talkers magazine, a radio trade publication, ranked the top 250 talk show hosts in the country. Jim Rome, whose long pauses and almost incomprehensible self-references are heard locally on Fox Sports 1370, was the highest-rated of the sports variety at No. 29. No Baltimore sports types made the list.
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY and KEN MURRAY,SUN REPORTER | January 6, 2006
The possibilities are as enticing as they are endless. In short order, we could be watching a Super Bowl between Hall of Fame coaches -- one who's already got his bust in Canton, the Washington Redskins' Joe Gibbs, and another who's got reservations, the New England Patriots' Bill Belichick. It might not be much for sound bites, but it'd be great for X's and O's. Or we could have a coaches' Redemption Bowl between the Seattle Seahawks' Mike Holmgren and the Denver Broncos' Mike Shanahan.
SPORTS
By EDWARD LEE and EDWARD LEE,SUN REPORTER | January 5, 2006
Jon Gruden is the first to admit he doesn't take the time to sit back and review his impressive resume. That includes a Super Bowl victory with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in early 2003 and a three-year run during which his Oakland Raiders and Buccaneers teams compiled a 34-14 record and qualified for the playoffs each season. So it's no surprise that Gruden espouses little joy about Tampa Bay's 11-5 record and NFC South crown after the club stumbled its way to records of 7-9 and 5-11 the previous two seasons.
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY and KEN MURRAY,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2004
When Butch Davis walked away from the Cleveland Browns last week, he left behind a trail of ill will forged by his four-year power grab. The more power Davis grabbed, the less effectively he wielded it. In the end, players tuned him out, management distrusted his decisions, and fans heaped their frustration on him. Consider the stunning rise and fall of Davis instructive in the long-held NFL policy of copying success. Teams can try to copy winning formulas, but rarely can they duplicate them.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2003
SAN DIEGO - Jon Gruden bobbed and weaved all week, dodging questions about his Oakland Raiders past and the high tariff the Tampa Bay Buccaneers paid to get him. Last night, he finally answered Al Davis and the skeptics. Not in words, but in results. Yes, he was worth it. Worth every penny of the $8 million, worth each of the four draft picks the Bucs surrendered last February to Davis, Oakland's managing general partner. Gruden's underdog Bucs stung the Raiders for 34 straight points, then withstood a late Oakland charge to win Super Bowl XXXVII, 48-21, at Qualcomm Stadium.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | November 8, 1998
Al Davis, who brings his Oakland Raiders to Camden Yards today, can feel a lot of empathy for the Baltimore football fans.Like him, they like to live in the past.Davis and the fans savor the days of the old Raiders and the old Colts. They each won three championships and lost one Super Bowl. Their highlights are always showing up on the Classic Sports Network. Just last Thursday, the cable network showed the highlights of the Raiders' double-overtime victory over the Colts in the 1977 AFC playoffs.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2003
SAN DIEGO - Jon Gruden's past catches up with his future in the 37th Super Bowl on Sunday. The offense he created with the Oakland Raiders meets the defense he inherited with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers for the NFL championship. In one sense, the 39-year-old Bucs coach can't lose. He will be credited with pushing Tampa Bay over the top if the Bucs win, and for laying the foundation if the Raiders win. Gruden is easily the biggest story line in this year's Super Bowl, in which a tangle of coaching paths and broken player-coach relationships will cross in Qualcomm Stadium.
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