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August 21, 2009
On Wednesday, August 19, 2009 HARLEAN (nee Meyerson) JOLSON mother of Lisa S. Jolson; also survived by many friends. The family will receive friends at the family owned Peaceful Alternatives Funeral & Cremation Center, P.A., 2325 York Road, Timonium, 21093 on Sunday, August 23 from 1 p.m. until 3 p.m. Please omit flowers. Memorial contributions may be made to the charity of your choice.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2011
Ann P. "Nip" Melocik, a retired parochial school physical education instructor, died Wednesday of heart failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Loch Raven Village resident was 80. The daughter of a restaurateur and a homemaker, the former Ann Palmisano was born in Shamokin, Pa. She moved to Hamilton with her family in 1940 when her father opened several Palmisano's Sub Shops in the area. "She got her nickname 'Nip' from taking a little sip of her father's drink, so he named her 'Nipper,' and then everyone began calling her 'Nip,'" said a niece, Wendy Strassner of Atlanta.
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NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | September 23, 1995
Bouncing Bobby Berger strolled into Luigi Petti's restaurant in Little Italy on Tuesday, giving me a wave as he approached my table. Dressed in a short-sleeve black shirt open at the collar and beige pants, he sat down and ordered coffee only.Bobby Berger, head of B.B.B. (Bouncing Bobby Berger) Productions and a former Baltimore City police officer, gained notoriety in the 1980s for performing an imitation of Al Jolson -- complete with blackface makeup. An NAACP protest forced the cancellation of his show at the Hilton Hotel in 1982.
NEWS
August 21, 2009
On Wednesday, August 19, 2009 HARLEAN (nee Meyerson) JOLSON mother of Lisa S. Jolson; also survived by many friends. The family will receive friends at the family owned Peaceful Alternatives Funeral & Cremation Center, P.A., 2325 York Road, Timonium, 21093 on Sunday, August 23 from 1 p.m. until 3 p.m. Please omit flowers. Memorial contributions may be made to the charity of your choice.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1998
A New Yorker in Baltimore to tap dance in a musical profile of Al Jolson was mugged and shot late Friday on a downtown street outside his hotel after one of his performances.James Branford Pace was recovering at Johns Hopkins Hospital from a bullet wound to his neck. He was in serious condition. Police said he might be paralyzed."Everybody, including my staff, we're all down," said Robert M. Pomory, president of Lyric Theatre, where the show "Jolson: The Musical" ended its six-day run Sunday before heading to Florida yesterday.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1998
Mike Burstyn, 53, is an internationally known star for all the right reasons.Burstyn, who is playing Al Jolson in "Jolson: The Musical," coming to the Lyric Opera House tomorrow, isn't exactly an overnight sensation. "It's something you have to apprentice to and learn hands-on," he says of acting.The New York-born performer, who traveled all over the world with his Yiddish theater-immersed family, didn't spend years in acting school. "It's more a craft than an academic subject," he says.And Burstyn, who lives half the year in Israel and half in the New York suburb of Scarsdale, wasn't seduced by the notion of a Hollywood lifestyle and indulgently decided the life was for him. "This is what I loved to do. It was in my blood."
NEWS
By Neil A. Grauer | November 22, 1998
From Tuesday through Sunday, a lavish musical about Al Jolson is scheduled to run at the Lyric Opera House in Baltimore. It's a little-known footnote that Jolson, an Orthodox Jew and the son of a rabbi, is an alumnus of the Catholic-run St. Mary's Industrial School for Boys.Jolson (1886-1950) is remembered for his performances in blackface. As Mel Watkins wrote in his landmark 1994 history on black humor, "On the Real Side," when Jolson and other performers - black and white - donned burnt cork, they created a "caricature that for many whites defined black Americans on and off the stage for more than a century."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | July 27, 1998
It's going to be an all-singing, all-dancing season for Performing Arts Productions at the Lyric Opera House in 1998-1999."At the Lyric, musicals are very much the most popular format," said Nicholas A. Litrenta, president of Performing Arts, in announcing the four-show subscription season. On the schedule are "Jolson -- The Musical," "Steel City," "Fame -- The Musical" and "Lord of the Dance."The lineup has one less show than the Lyric's recent subscription seasons. Litrenta cited several reasons for the decrease, including a desire to make the subscription more affordable.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 20, 2002
The Jazz Singer was the movie that sold the public on talking pictures in 1927 -- the one in which Al Jolson sang "My Mammy." But there's no trace of Jolson in the version playing at Toby's Dinner Theatre. Adaptor Michael Tilford went back to the play on which the movie was based, reworked it for today's audiences and added a batch of great period songs and some original numbers. The result is a lively new musical. The Jazz Singer is set in the early decades of the 20th century, when great tides of European immigrants were arriving in the United States.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 27, 1998
Theatergoers probably have a right to expect big things from a show about Al Jolson, the singer who billed himself as "the world's greatest entertainer" and who promised audiences, "You ain't heard nothin' yet."And, in "Jolson: The Musical," now at the Lyric Opera House, lead actor Mike Burstyn delivers an entertaining impersonation of Jolson and especially of his distinctive vocal style.But musical biographies of entertainers are tricky to pull off. The best -- "Gypsy" and "Funny Girl," for example -- do more than tell the title character's life story; they tell us something about ourselves, whether in the form of cautionary tales, love stories or domestic dramas.
NEWS
January 25, 2004
On January 21, 2004, JOHN THORNTON BERGER, devoted father of Sandie Castle, Leslie and Rodney Berger and the late John Thornton Berger, Jr., Edward Matthew and Victoria Lynn Berger, dear brother of Albert J. and Thomas E. Berger, Bobby "Al Jolson" Berger, Jane Ann Laird, Patricia A. Sansone, Collette Schmidt and Loretta Paone; loving grandfather of Shawn C. H. Baron, Edward Berger, Josh and Sean Snyder and Rodney M. Berger, II and Jennifer Berger....
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 20, 2002
The Jazz Singer was the movie that sold the public on talking pictures in 1927 -- the one in which Al Jolson sang "My Mammy." But there's no trace of Jolson in the version playing at Toby's Dinner Theatre. Adaptor Michael Tilford went back to the play on which the movie was based, reworked it for today's audiences and added a batch of great period songs and some original numbers. The result is a lively new musical. The Jazz Singer is set in the early decades of the 20th century, when great tides of European immigrants were arriving in the United States.
NEWS
July 27, 2001
Helen Brogden Turnbull, 94, YWCA school director Helen Brogden Turnbull, who was active in the Episcopal Church and was former director of Hannah Harrison School of the YWCA in Washington, died Monday of congestive heart failure at the Edenwald retirement community in Towson. She was 94. A former resident of Guilford Towers in North Baltimore, she had lived at Edenwald since 1990. Miss Turnbull, who had headed the Hannah Harrison School from 1969 until retiring in 1973, had been director of leadership training and field outreach for the United Churchwomen of the National Council of Churches in New York City.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1998
A New Yorker in Baltimore to tap dance in a musical profile of Al Jolson was mugged and shot late Friday on a downtown street outside his hotel after one of his performances.James Branford Pace was recovering at Johns Hopkins Hospital from a bullet wound to his neck. He was in serious condition. Police said he might be paralyzed."Everybody, including my staff, we're all down," said Robert M. Pomory, president of Lyric Theatre, where the show "Jolson: The Musical" ended its six-day run Sunday before heading to Florida yesterday.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 27, 1998
Theatergoers probably have a right to expect big things from a show about Al Jolson, the singer who billed himself as "the world's greatest entertainer" and who promised audiences, "You ain't heard nothin' yet."And, in "Jolson: The Musical," now at the Lyric Opera House, lead actor Mike Burstyn delivers an entertaining impersonation of Jolson and especially of his distinctive vocal style.But musical biographies of entertainers are tricky to pull off. The best -- "Gypsy" and "Funny Girl," for example -- do more than tell the title character's life story; they tell us something about ourselves, whether in the form of cautionary tales, love stories or domestic dramas.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1998
Mike Burstyn, 53, is an internationally known star for all the right reasons.Burstyn, who is playing Al Jolson in "Jolson: The Musical," coming to the Lyric Opera House tomorrow, isn't exactly an overnight sensation. "It's something you have to apprentice to and learn hands-on," he says of acting.The New York-born performer, who traveled all over the world with his Yiddish theater-immersed family, didn't spend years in acting school. "It's more a craft than an academic subject," he says.And Burstyn, who lives half the year in Israel and half in the New York suburb of Scarsdale, wasn't seduced by the notion of a Hollywood lifestyle and indulgently decided the life was for him. "This is what I loved to do. It was in my blood."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 15, 1996
Bouncing Bobby Berger greeted me with a hug at the doors of the dinner theater of the Best Western Motel in Baltimore Travel Plaza."Greg, I didn't think you'd make it," Bobby said, obviously happy to see me. He didn't know the half of it. I'd promised him last month that I would attend his retirement performance Mother's Day. That was before I was sent on an assignment abroad. I returned to Baltimore only the previous Monday.So here I was, about to watch Bobby perform his blackface Al Jolson routine for the last time.
NEWS
July 27, 2001
Helen Brogden Turnbull, 94, YWCA school director Helen Brogden Turnbull, who was active in the Episcopal Church and was former director of Hannah Harrison School of the YWCA in Washington, died Monday of congestive heart failure at the Edenwald retirement community in Towson. She was 94. A former resident of Guilford Towers in North Baltimore, she had lived at Edenwald since 1990. Miss Turnbull, who had headed the Hannah Harrison School from 1969 until retiring in 1973, had been director of leadership training and field outreach for the United Churchwomen of the National Council of Churches in New York City.
NEWS
By Neil A. Grauer | November 22, 1998
From Tuesday through Sunday, a lavish musical about Al Jolson is scheduled to run at the Lyric Opera House in Baltimore. It's a little-known footnote that Jolson, an Orthodox Jew and the son of a rabbi, is an alumnus of the Catholic-run St. Mary's Industrial School for Boys.Jolson (1886-1950) is remembered for his performances in blackface. As Mel Watkins wrote in his landmark 1994 history on black humor, "On the Real Side," when Jolson and other performers - black and white - donned burnt cork, they created a "caricature that for many whites defined black Americans on and off the stage for more than a century."
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