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By Gene Austin and Gene Austin,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 18, 1993
Q: A long crack has reopened in our living room wall, which is covered with gypsum wallboard. I fixed the crack several years ago and thought I wouldn't have to do it again. Are there any "new and improved" crack patchers on the market that might make a permanent repair?A: Some wall and ceiling cracks are difficult to repair permanently because slight shifting of the house can cause them to reopen. Patches that are flexible enough to move with the house have the best chance of not cracking.
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BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie and Ron Nodine | December 5, 1999
IF YOU'RE looking forward to spending some time during the holidays lounging on the sofa, here's a hint: Close your eyes. If you don't, they're likely to roam over the room, and you're pretty much guaranteed to see something that needs to be done like that crack in the ceiling. Where did that come from?Here are some tips that will help you figure out what to do:Let's start with plaster. The first thing you should determine is if the existing plaster is secure enough to repair or if it's so damaged it should be replaced.
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FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | August 17, 1991
When people say they don't like drywall, they usually mean they don't like the problems that come from a bad finishing job -- bubbles, cracks and obvious seam lines.Drywall finishing requires a bit of a "touch." Too light a hand with the joint compound will leave the tape too thinly covered; too heavy a hand will mean hours and hours of sanding. Anyone with a little manual dexterity can learn to do it well; it just takes practice. The inside of a closet is a good place to start.Here are the tools you need.
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie and Ron Nodine | October 18, 1998
IF YOU LIVE in an old house, it's highly likely that you have plaster walls and ceilings. Most people love them -- they're a good, solid surface -- but they can pose problems if they're damaged. We get a lot of questions about dealing with various plaster problems, especially when it comes to replacing it.But let's start with some plaster history. You can determine the approximate age of your home by the type of plaster and/or the way it's applied. If you have wood lath behind the plaster, your walls are probably built before 1930 or so. If there is horse hair in the brown coat (the layer under the white coat)
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | August 24, 1991
If you've ever watched a pro finish drywall, you probably thought to yourself, "I can do that." And probably the first time you tried it -- and the tape didn't stick, and the joint compound had lumps and the ridges wouldn't ever go away -- you thought, "I can't do that."Actually, you probably can do it. Once you know what pitfalls to avoid and have gotten in a little practice, you should be able to finish a lot of drywall with only a little sanding.Sanding is the key. It's labor-intensive, time-consuming, messy and bor-rrring.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | November 20, 1993
One of the nicest things about finishing drywall is anybody can do it. With a little practice, and a little patience, even a drywall rookie can end up with seamlessly smooth walls that just beg for a coat of paint to perfect them.There are, of course, a few basic rules. The first one is, don't start finishing until you are through installing. That is, all the drywall must be in place, each piece snugged tight to its neighbors, with no cracks or gaps, and all outside corners neatly finished with corner bead.
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie and Ron Nodine | December 5, 1999
IF YOU'RE looking forward to spending some time during the holidays lounging on the sofa, here's a hint: Close your eyes. If you don't, they're likely to roam over the room, and you're pretty much guaranteed to see something that needs to be done like that crack in the ceiling. Where did that come from?Here are some tips that will help you figure out what to do:Let's start with plaster. The first thing you should determine is if the existing plaster is secure enough to repair or if it's so damaged it should be replaced.
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie and Ron Nodine | October 18, 1998
IF YOU LIVE in an old house, it's highly likely that you have plaster walls and ceilings. Most people love them -- they're a good, solid surface -- but they can pose problems if they're damaged. We get a lot of questions about dealing with various plaster problems, especially when it comes to replacing it.But let's start with some plaster history. You can determine the approximate age of your home by the type of plaster and/or the way it's applied. If you have wood lath behind the plaster, your walls are probably built before 1930 or so. If there is horse hair in the brown coat (the layer under the white coat)
NEWS
By PHYLLIS FLOWERS AND PHYLLIS LUCAS | October 4, 1993
If you graduated from St. Rose of Lima Catholic School in 1968, it's time for your 25-year reunion. The event is from 7:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. Nov. 13 at the St. Rose Catholic School Hall, 410 Jeffrey St.The menu includes a hot and cold buffet, beer and setups. Music will be provided by the disk jockeys, "Havin' A Party." A photographer will take photos and a souvenir booklet will be distributed. Tickets are $18 per person.Call Sharon Anderson Zacks at 551-8359. Spread the word to your classmates and enjoy a night of reminiscing.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson and Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson,Mr. Johnson is construction manager for Neighborhood Housing Services of Baltimore. Ms. Menzie is Home Editor of The Sun | August 31, 1991
Just because a wall has some chips or cracks -- or even a hole or two -- doesn't necessarily mean it has to be replaced.There are two reasons to save an old wall surface: because it's the best way to save old trim (assuming the old trim is worth saving); and because you may save some money if you do the work yourself.The bad news is that the work is time-consuming and labor-intensive, but the good news is that almost anyone can learn to fix plaster or drywall so the repairs are invisible.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | November 20, 1993
One of the nicest things about finishing drywall is anybody can do it. With a little practice, and a little patience, even a drywall rookie can end up with seamlessly smooth walls that just beg for a coat of paint to perfect them.There are, of course, a few basic rules. The first one is, don't start finishing until you are through installing. That is, all the drywall must be in place, each piece snugged tight to its neighbors, with no cracks or gaps, and all outside corners neatly finished with corner bead.
NEWS
By PHYLLIS FLOWERS AND PHYLLIS LUCAS | October 4, 1993
If you graduated from St. Rose of Lima Catholic School in 1968, it's time for your 25-year reunion. The event is from 7:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. Nov. 13 at the St. Rose Catholic School Hall, 410 Jeffrey St.The menu includes a hot and cold buffet, beer and setups. Music will be provided by the disk jockeys, "Havin' A Party." A photographer will take photos and a souvenir booklet will be distributed. Tickets are $18 per person.Call Sharon Anderson Zacks at 551-8359. Spread the word to your classmates and enjoy a night of reminiscing.
FEATURES
By Gene Austin and Gene Austin,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 18, 1993
Q: A long crack has reopened in our living room wall, which is covered with gypsum wallboard. I fixed the crack several years ago and thought I wouldn't have to do it again. Are there any "new and improved" crack patchers on the market that might make a permanent repair?A: Some wall and ceiling cracks are difficult to repair permanently because slight shifting of the house can cause them to reopen. Patches that are flexible enough to move with the house have the best chance of not cracking.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | August 24, 1991
If you've ever watched a pro finish drywall, you probably thought to yourself, "I can do that." And probably the first time you tried it -- and the tape didn't stick, and the joint compound had lumps and the ridges wouldn't ever go away -- you thought, "I can't do that."Actually, you probably can do it. Once you know what pitfalls to avoid and have gotten in a little practice, you should be able to finish a lot of drywall with only a little sanding.Sanding is the key. It's labor-intensive, time-consuming, messy and bor-rrring.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | August 17, 1991
When people say they don't like drywall, they usually mean they don't like the problems that come from a bad finishing job -- bubbles, cracks and obvious seam lines.Drywall finishing requires a bit of a "touch." Too light a hand with the joint compound will leave the tape too thinly covered; too heavy a hand will mean hours and hours of sanding. Anyone with a little manual dexterity can learn to do it well; it just takes practice. The inside of a closet is a good place to start.Here are the tools you need.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | November 23, 1996
CRACKS IN the walls are like wrinkles in your forehead. You learn to live with them. Yet every so often you feel compelled to take cosmetic action.Last weekend I got the urge to patch some of the cracks in our plaster walls. I started with a 2-foot-long fissure in the hallway ceiling on the top floor. This crack appeared several months ago after one of the kids jumped up and slammed his hand into the ceiling.You might ask why anyone would slam his hand into a ceiling. But you would not ask this if you shared living space with aspiring basketball players.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | November 13, 1993
Guerry Green installed a lot of porch screens as a contractor in Georgetown, S.C., where screened-in porches are a genteel way of life. And he went back and repaired a lot of them too, when they got torn, or bent, or blown away in a hurricane.It occurred to him one day that there had to be a better way to install screens than stapling them to the frames and covering the edges with lattice strips. If the screens had to be replaced, the lattice had to be removed -- and usually replaced -- and the screen ripped away, the staples removed or pounded down . . .So Mr. Green thought about the problem for a while, and then he invented the Screen Tight Porch Screening System.
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