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By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau | April 20, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Without fanfare, the Joint Chiefs of Staff have been making gradual changes in the way they watch the world from the windowless command center inside the Pentagon.The changes are supposed to increase efficiency and improve the flow of information throughout the complex -- with fewer people. The military chiefs consider this as much a response to recent budget cuts as an adjustment to the reduced threat of nuclear war.In the "war room" -- actually a maze of secure communications rooms and conference areas that are usually off-limits to outsiders -- it was revealed during a recent visit that staffing has been cut by about 25 percent since 1990.
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Peter Schmuck | January 11, 2014
It has been four weeks since Navy added to its string of victories over Army in college football's most venerated rivalry, but the amicable athletic animosity between the nation's two oldest service academies does not begin and end on the gridiron. Their reciprocal mantras - "Go Navy, beat Army" and "Go Army, Beat Navy" - reverberate through their respective athletic programs all year round, and the intensity of the rivalry was very much on display for Saturday's nationally televised basketball doubleheader at Alumni Hall.
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NEWS
By Cox News ServiceKnight-Ridder News Service | March 28, 1993
WASHINGTON -- When House hearings on the ban against homosexuals in the military begin this week, some high-profile witnesses -- the Joint Chiefs of Staff, who favor keeping the ban -- will be missing.The only active uniformed witness scheduled to testify before the House Armed Services Committee is Petty Officer Keith Meinhold, who was recently discharged from the Navy because he is gay. A federal judge later ordered the Navy to reinstate Petty Officer Meinhold.The decision to exclude the Joint Chiefs was made by the committee chairman, Ronald V. Dellums, a California Democrat whom many in the military view warily.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2013
Annapolis is preparing this week to host its first-ever college football bowl game. Festivities for the 2013 Military Bowl on Friday, Dec. 27 will include several events in and around the city - a parade, a tailgate party, a concert and a nationally televised game between the University of Maryland and Marshall. "It's just a positive experience, hopefully, for everyone involved," said Steve Beck, executive director of the Military Bowl. Tens of thousands of fans are expected to descend on Annapolis for the bowl game at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 3, 2001
WASHINGTON - The biggest guessing game in the Pentagon these days is which general or admiral will be the next chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the top military adviser to the president. Speculation has centered on two senior Air Force officers, Gen. Ralph E. "Ed" Eberhart, commander of the U.S. North American Aerospace Command and U.S. Space Command, and Gen. Richard B. Myers, vice chairman of the joint chiefs. Also said to be in the running are Adm. Vern Clark, chief of naval operations, and Marine Gen. Peter Pace, commander of the U.S. Southern Command, a military region that encompasses Central and South America.
NEWS
By Eric Schmitt and Eric Schmitt,New York Times News Service | January 23, 1993
WASHINGTON -- In an angry challenge to the administration's promise to lift the ban on homosexuals in the armed forces, the Joint Chiefs of Staff are fighting to persuade President Clinton to reverse his campaign pledge, senior military officials said yesterday.Defense Secretary Les Aspin's first meeting on Thursday with the Joint Chiefs was dominated by an emotional, two-hour discussion of their concerns that repealing the ban would wreck morale, undermine recruiting, force devoutly religious service members to resign and increase the risk of AIDS for heterosexual troops, senior officers said.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Richard H. P. Sia and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau | January 26, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton reaffirmed his commitment to lifting the ban on gays in the military yesterday despite open opposition from the Joint Chiefs of Staff and resistance in Congress.In what is shaping up as one of the most sensitive domestic issues of his early presidency, Mr. Clinton is attempting to find a way of fulfilling his campaign promise with the least political damage. His aides said he would issue his initial order within a week.Mr. Clinton met with the military chiefs yesterday and will meet with a bipartisan group from Congress today to try to overcome broad resistance in both groups to the move, which would reverse a 1986 Pentagon directive declaring that homosexuality was incompatible with military service and subject to discharge.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 30, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff who guided U.S. military operations in Haiti and Bosnia, plans to retire from the military in September, a White House spokesman announced yesterday.By stepping down, the 60-year-old general is following other Joint Chiefs chairmen who left office after serving two two-year terms.White House spokesman Mike McCurry said President Clinton had not decided who will replace Shalikashvili or Gen. George Joulwan, NATO's supreme allied commander, who will retire in the spring.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun Reporter | June 9, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Bowing to congressional anger over the course and management of the Iraq war, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said yesterday that he will recommend that Gen. Peter Pace, who has been at the highest levels of war strategy and decision-making since 2001, be replaced as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff when his term ends in September. Thwarted in his desire to keep Pace on for another two years, Gates' decision cuts short what normally is a four-year stint as the nation's senior military officer and chief military adviser to the president.
NEWS
By William Wan and William Wan,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2005
President Bush yesterday nominated Gen. Peter Pace, the son of an Italian immigrant, to be chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the nation's top military post. Pace, a 1967 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis and commander of a rifle platoon during the Vietnam War, would be the first Marine to be chairman should he be confirmed by the U.S. Senate. Bush called the 59-year-old "the story of the American dream." Guiding the armed forces into the 21st century, Pace would inherit a military challenged by a global war on terrorism.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
Hours after Congress passed a range of proposals to combat sexual assaults in the armed forces, President Barack Obama ordered military leaders on Friday to conduct a yearlong review of their progress in eliminating rape from the ranks — and threatened further changes if he is not satisfied. "So long as our women and men in uniform face the insider threat of sexual assault, we have an urgent obligation to do more to support victims and hold perpetrators accountable for their crimes," Obama said.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
Congress was poised late Thursday to pass new legal protections for victims of sexual assault in the military, but victims and their advocates already were looking ahead to a larger battle: the contentious campaign to overhaul the military justice system. That debate, which is expected to resume when lawmakers return to Washington in January, comes amid rising concern over rape in the ranks. The Pentagon estimates that 26,000 service members, both male and female, were subjected to unwanted sexual contact last year.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2013
As a long-haired teen growing up in the 1960s, Jim McCullough had little clue what he wanted to do with his life, but two things did stir him: He hated the way some people in Laurel, his hometown, looked down on his African-American friends, and he loved using the wood lathe in shop class. He has traded the hippie locks for a grandfather's trim goatee. He long ago gained renown in the region as a master furniture craftsman, at times for his work on pieces used by government officials from presidents to attorneys general.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2013
When Maryland National Guard Capt. Cara Kupcho first enlisted in the military 18 years ago, she wanted to drive a Bradley Fighting Vehicle, a 30-ton, armor-busting tank. "I like things that go boom," she explained Thursday. "I like tanks. " But as a woman, Kupcho was barred from joining any of the armored units that used the vehicles. She became a mechanic instead, able to maintain tanks, but prohibited from driving them into battle. Outgoing Defense Secretary Leon Panetta announced plans Thursday to end the long-standing prohibition on servicewomen in direct combat roles, opening hundreds of thousands of jobs formerly limited to men. "In our democracy, I believe it is the responsibility of every citizen to protect the nation," Panetta said.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | November 19, 2012
Defense Secretary Leon Panetta says he was planning this even before the recent scandals in the top ranks of the Pentagon and CIA, but he's ordered the military to double down on ethics training for its senior officers. In a memo to Gen. Martin Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Mr. Panetta didn't reference Gen. David Petraeus' affair with his biographer or Gen. John Allen's mountain of "inappropriate" emails to a Tampa socialite - but he didn't have to. And they are not the only brass behaving badly.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 5, 2012
During the Republican National Convention in Tampa, a website called Gateway Pundit posted photographs of letters of condolence sent by President Barack Obama to the families of Navy SEALs killed in a horrendous combat crash last year as proof that an auto-pen was used to reproduce the president's signature on form letters of sympathy. Some family members expressed hurt and dismay that their loss would be acknowledged in assembly line fashion, and Donald Trump tweeted that the president must be too busy playing golf.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 30, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Aging weaponry, inadequate pay and benefits, and too many overseas missions are causing serious strains within the armed forces, top military chiefs warned Congress yesterday, saying tens of billions of dollars will be needed to correct the problems.Gen. Henry H. Shelton, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said that while the military can still execute its goal of being able to fight two major wars simultaneously while still meeting its security commitments elsewhere, there are indications it is being stretched too thin.
NEWS
By Robert Scales | September 29, 2011
The story is perhaps apocryphal but often told. Adm. Mike Mullen was attending a tony affair dressed in civvies when a woman approached to ask what he did for a living. He replied, "Madam, I'm chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. " The woman answered unknowingly: "Well, what's that?" To which he replied, in his usual, understated manner: "Well, the chairman's job is the highest position in the military. " The woman recoiled in confusion and apologized profusely, "Oh, I'm sorry I didn't recognize you, General Petraeus.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2011
Flying over Iraq this week, Maryland National Guard Col. David W. Carey surveyed miles and miles of emptiness. Where 500 U.S. bases once housed as many as 170,000 troops, the American military footprint had shrunk to two bases and 4,000 soldiers - all with orders to pack up and move out by the end of month. "It's as if you're going to a ghost town," Carey, commander of the 29th Combat Aviation Brigade, said Thursday from Iraq. "I have instructed and encouraged my soldiers to take it all in, take pictures, write stuff down, keep a journal," he said.
NEWS
By Robert Scales | September 29, 2011
The story is perhaps apocryphal but often told. Adm. Mike Mullen was attending a tony affair dressed in civvies when a woman approached to ask what he did for a living. He replied, "Madam, I'm chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. " The woman answered unknowingly: "Well, what's that?" To which he replied, in his usual, understated manner: "Well, the chairman's job is the highest position in the military. " The woman recoiled in confusion and apologized profusely, "Oh, I'm sorry I didn't recognize you, General Petraeus.
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