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BUSINESS
By Humberto Cruz | May 29, 2005
Q. My wife has run up a balance of thousands of dollars on her credit card. I try to stem the flow but usually am unsuccessful. Am I liable for these debts? A. I checked with the folks at Your Credit Card Cos. (www.yourcreditcardcompanies.com), a group of major financial services companies that provide useful information on handling credit, enhancing your credit score and preventing identify theft. Their answer to your question is a resounding, "It depends." If the credit card your wife is using is part of a joint account with you, you are as legally liable as she is. And the way she handles the card will reflect on your credit score as well as hers.
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NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | February 12, 2006
Only in the Information Age could those teeming billions of unwanted, mostly unreadable computer e-mail messages called spam possibly be considered objects worthy of serious artistic attention. But New York-based conceptual artist Graham Parker has seen the writing on the wall, so to speak. Parker, whose show Actual Size is on view at C. Grimaldis Gallery, uses Internet spam - anonymous, computerized commercial pitches for everything from prescription drugs and low-interest home loans to fake Rolex watches and online dating services - to explore the spirit of our era. "I'm of a generation that was very self-consciously introduced to computers," says Parker, 35. "So, as with any kind of new technology, you're aware of how it changes your sensibility, just as you're aware of how the spread of cell phones has changed the way you think about your day."
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BUSINESS
By Julie Jason | March 21, 2004
People who want ultimate safety often turn to their banks because of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. guarantee. The FDIC steps in when a bank goes out of business, and according to the sign in the teller window, covers up to $100,000 of deposits. But FDIC insurance may cover more than $100,000 per depositor, depending on the category of legal ownership. As in the following hypothetical case, things are not as simple as they seem. Let's suppose in one bank you have: a $75,000 certificate of deposit in your name; a $50,000 savings account; a $100,000 individual retirement account; a $100,000 CD payable on your death to your granddaughter; a $100,000 joint savings account with your godchild; a $225,000 joint savings account with your spouse, for a total of $650,000.
BUSINESS
By Humberto Cruz | May 29, 2005
Q. My wife has run up a balance of thousands of dollars on her credit card. I try to stem the flow but usually am unsuccessful. Am I liable for these debts? A. I checked with the folks at Your Credit Card Cos. (www.yourcreditcardcompanies.com), a group of major financial services companies that provide useful information on handling credit, enhancing your credit score and preventing identify theft. Their answer to your question is a resounding, "It depends." If the credit card your wife is using is part of a joint account with you, you are as legally liable as she is. And the way she handles the card will reflect on your credit score as well as hers.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 11, 1993
NEW YORK -- A chemical engineer of Palestinian descent who had studied the principles of explosives was arrested and charged yesterday with aiding in the World Trade Center bombing, as federal investigators said they believe that money to finance the bombing came from Europe.Nidal A. Ayyad, a 25-year-old employee of Allied Signal Inc., became the second suspect directly linked to the Manhattan blast that left at least at least five dead and more than 1,000 people injured.He was seized at his apartment in Maplewood, N.J., at 6:42 a.m. by a SWAT team of federal agents after a long trail of clues led from the initial suspect, Mohammed A. Salameh, 25, to the young engineer.
BUSINESS
By Brenda Richardson and Brenda Richardson,Chicago Tribune | April 18, 1993
Chicago -- If there's one thing Timothy Abrams learned earl in his marriage, it's that a joint lifestyle is one thing; a joint financial lifestyle is quite another.After marrying in October, Mr. Abrams, a sales representative for a Chicago area printing company, and his wife, Lisa, a second-grade teacher, still viewed their financial lives as separate. "It took us a couple of months to say, 'Look, this is our money, and we should use it for the same goal,' " he said.Now, said Mr. Abrams, 25, "Lisa gives me her paycheck every month, and I put it with mine into a bill-paying account.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | September 8, 2002
WITH BILLIONS of dollars being parked in banks this year as investors wait out a bearish stock market, more certificates of deposit and savings accounts in the six figures are likely. For depositors who want to keep more than $100,000 in a single bank or thrift, it's a good idea to make sure accounts are set up so that their assets are fully covered by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. FDIC insurance kicks in if a bank or savings and loan fails. Failures are infrequent - eight have occurred this year among more than 9,500 FDIC-insured institutions - but they still happen and can imperil depositors' money.
BUSINESS
By Stephen Manes | November 6, 1995
USE THE RIGHT software, and your computer can do some banking tricks that most automated teller machines cannot. The latest versions of two popular personal finance packages have arrived: Quicken version 5 from Intuit Inc. and Microsoft Money for Windows 95 from the obvious suspect. When connected to a modem and a participating bank, the programs can capture banking and credit card statements, transfer funds between accounts, tell you which checks have cleared and pay bills automatically or on request.
NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | February 12, 2006
Only in the Information Age could those teeming billions of unwanted, mostly unreadable computer e-mail messages called spam possibly be considered objects worthy of serious artistic attention. But New York-based conceptual artist Graham Parker has seen the writing on the wall, so to speak. Parker, whose show Actual Size is on view at C. Grimaldis Gallery, uses Internet spam - anonymous, computerized commercial pitches for everything from prescription drugs and low-interest home loans to fake Rolex watches and online dating services - to explore the spirit of our era. "I'm of a generation that was very self-consciously introduced to computers," says Parker, 35. "So, as with any kind of new technology, you're aware of how it changes your sensibility, just as you're aware of how the spread of cell phones has changed the way you think about your day."
BUSINESS
By Neil Downing and Neil Downing,PROVIDENCE JOURNAL | October 17, 1999
Exactly how much insurance does the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. now provide on bank deposits? I have a checking account, two CDs, all in my name. Am I insured only once, or are all three accounts insured for $100,000 individually? M. W., Warrenville, S.C. Only once. Here's why: The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. (FDIC) provides up to $100,000 in insurance coverage per depositor, per account category, per institution. Coverage doesn't apply to each account.
BUSINESS
By Julie Jason | March 21, 2004
People who want ultimate safety often turn to their banks because of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. guarantee. The FDIC steps in when a bank goes out of business, and according to the sign in the teller window, covers up to $100,000 of deposits. But FDIC insurance may cover more than $100,000 per depositor, depending on the category of legal ownership. As in the following hypothetical case, things are not as simple as they seem. Let's suppose in one bank you have: a $75,000 certificate of deposit in your name; a $50,000 savings account; a $100,000 individual retirement account; a $100,000 CD payable on your death to your granddaughter; a $100,000 joint savings account with your godchild; a $225,000 joint savings account with your spouse, for a total of $650,000.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | September 8, 2002
WITH BILLIONS of dollars being parked in banks this year as investors wait out a bearish stock market, more certificates of deposit and savings accounts in the six figures are likely. For depositors who want to keep more than $100,000 in a single bank or thrift, it's a good idea to make sure accounts are set up so that their assets are fully covered by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. FDIC insurance kicks in if a bank or savings and loan fails. Failures are infrequent - eight have occurred this year among more than 9,500 FDIC-insured institutions - but they still happen and can imperil depositors' money.
BUSINESS
By Stephen Manes | November 6, 1995
USE THE RIGHT software, and your computer can do some banking tricks that most automated teller machines cannot. The latest versions of two popular personal finance packages have arrived: Quicken version 5 from Intuit Inc. and Microsoft Money for Windows 95 from the obvious suspect. When connected to a modem and a participating bank, the programs can capture banking and credit card statements, transfer funds between accounts, tell you which checks have cleared and pay bills automatically or on request.
BUSINESS
By Brenda Richardson and Brenda Richardson,Chicago Tribune | April 18, 1993
Chicago -- If there's one thing Timothy Abrams learned earl in his marriage, it's that a joint lifestyle is one thing; a joint financial lifestyle is quite another.After marrying in October, Mr. Abrams, a sales representative for a Chicago area printing company, and his wife, Lisa, a second-grade teacher, still viewed their financial lives as separate. "It took us a couple of months to say, 'Look, this is our money, and we should use it for the same goal,' " he said.Now, said Mr. Abrams, 25, "Lisa gives me her paycheck every month, and I put it with mine into a bill-paying account.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 11, 1993
NEW YORK -- A chemical engineer of Palestinian descent who had studied the principles of explosives was arrested and charged yesterday with aiding in the World Trade Center bombing, as federal investigators said they believe that money to finance the bombing came from Europe.Nidal A. Ayyad, a 25-year-old employee of Allied Signal Inc., became the second suspect directly linked to the Manhattan blast that left at least at least five dead and more than 1,000 people injured.He was seized at his apartment in Maplewood, N.J., at 6:42 a.m. by a SWAT team of federal agents after a long trail of clues led from the initial suspect, Mohammed A. Salameh, 25, to the young engineer.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 4, 1993
What could be safer than money in the bank? In most cases, nothing.But each year, consumers lose millions of dollars in uninsured deposits -- that is, amounts above $100,000 -- after their banks fail. And those losses have been growing in recent years, according to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., the government agency that insures bank deposits.When banks fail, uninsured deposits may be seized by the FDIC. The agency uses that money to help cover the costs of those failures.So how can you avoid losing money?
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 12, 1993
NEW YORK -- The foreign funds wired over recent months into the New Jersey joint bank account of two arrested suspects in the World Trade Center bombing have been traced to Germany, law-enforcement officials said yesterday.Germany has one of the largest Islamic communities in Europe and has been used by an array of Middle East terrorist organizations as a base of operations, intelligence experts said. But investigators said they were not sure where in Germany the $8,000 originated or whether it was provided to underwrite the Feb. 26 attack, which killed five people and injured more than 1,000.
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