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Johnstown Flood

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NEWS
January 11, 1991
Elsie Frum, 108, a survivor of the Johnstown Flood of 1889, died Wednesday in Johnstown, Pa. Mrs. Frum was 6 when she and her family fled to a hilltop and watched a wall of water roar through Johnstown on May 31, 1889. The flood killed 2,209 people in one of the country's worst natural disasters.Dimitris Mirat, 82, a stage actor who entertained Greek audiences for six decades, died yesterday in Athens, Greece.
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NEWS
October 14, 2002
Charles Guggenheim, 78, one of the country's most honored and prolific documentary filmmakers and winner of four Academy Awards, died of pancreatic cancer Wednesday in Washington. A pioneer director of political campaign television commercials and films, he was media director for the presidential campaigns of Adlai E. Stevenson, Robert F. Kennedy, George McGovern and Edward M. Kennedy. Mr. Guggenheim began his five-decade career in film in 1952, when he produced TV spots for Stevenson.
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FEATURES
By Bob Allen | May 26, 1991
For the citizens of Johnstown, Pa., a thriving company town for the Carnegie Coal & Iron Works about 75 miles southeast of Pittsburgh, it must have seemed like the undoing of God's promise to the survivors of Noah's Ark.Around 5 in the afternoon of May 31, 1889, about 20 million tons of water -- a virtual wall of water, as high as 70 feet in places, and moving at 40 miles an hour -- came rushing down the Conemaugh Valley. It swept through Johnstown, a progressive and thriving industrial community of 30,000 nestled in the foothills of the Allegheny Mountains, at the confluence of the Little Conemaugh and Stony Creek rivers.
TRAVEL
BY STEPHANIE SHAPIRO and BY STEPHANIE SHAPIRO,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2002
"Flood's over!" That's the hook for Johnstown's current campaign to lure visitors to the site of the notorious disaster that struck the town more than a century ago. It's a reassuring motto, but not an entirely accurate one. After torrential rain, the neglected South Fork dam burst on May 31, 1889, unleashing a crushing wall of water that claimed 2,209 lives and leveled the bustling Conemaugh Valley steel town, tucked deep within southwestern Pennsylvania's Alle-...
NEWS
October 14, 2002
Charles Guggenheim, 78, one of the country's most honored and prolific documentary filmmakers and winner of four Academy Awards, died of pancreatic cancer Wednesday in Washington. A pioneer director of political campaign television commercials and films, he was media director for the presidential campaigns of Adlai E. Stevenson, Robert F. Kennedy, George McGovern and Edward M. Kennedy. Mr. Guggenheim began his five-decade career in film in 1952, when he produced TV spots for Stevenson.
TRAVEL
BY STEPHANIE SHAPIRO and BY STEPHANIE SHAPIRO,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2002
"Flood's over!" That's the hook for Johnstown's current campaign to lure visitors to the site of the notorious disaster that struck the town more than a century ago. It's a reassuring motto, but not an entirely accurate one. After torrential rain, the neglected South Fork dam burst on May 31, 1889, unleashing a crushing wall of water that claimed 2,209 lives and leveled the bustling Conemaugh Valley steel town, tucked deep within southwestern Pennsylvania's Alle-...
NEWS
By JAMES H. BREADY | October 16, 1994
The outlook wasn't brilliant for the Louisville nine that day -- or that year. Owners and players despised each other. The team wasn't very good, especially at pitching and fielding; the club was undercapitalized and its president, Mordecai Davidson, was lulu.Few people bought tickets to watch home games as the Colonels quickly took over last place. In a series of vain maneuvers, Davidson tried to sell his best players, then to play out the season on the road, then to sell the franchise.As May ended, the players entrained for their first eastern trip.
NEWS
By ERNEST F. IMHOFF | February 21, 1993
Some newspaper people remind me of Charles Dickens. They momentarily live in the best of times or the worst of times, as in the opening line of "A Tale of Two Cities."While they work on the planet, they must be covering the first, the last, the biggest, the best, the worst, the smallest, the loudest, the dirtiest or the smelliest thing ever.The subject today is hyperbole, or extravagant exaggeration. My own fingers have never typed such an odoriferous outrage, which is our second example today.
NEWS
March 24, 1997
Grace Hefner,101, an early investor in her son's Playboy magazine who even helped pay for the magazine's first issue, died Thursday in Scottsdale, Ariz. Commenting on her death, Playboy Publisher Hugh Hefner said his mother had wished he had become a missionary instead.Frank Shomo,108, the last known survivor of the 1889 Johnstown Flood, one of the worst natural disasters in U.S. history, died Thursday in Blairsville, Pa. He was an infant when the earthen South Fork Dam in Cambria County collapsed and released a wall of water that killed 2,209 people in southwestern Pennsylvania.
TRAVEL
August 16, 2009
AmeriServ Flood City Music Festival Where: : Festival Park in Johnstown, Pa. When:: 5:30 p.m. to midnight Friday; noon to midnight Saturday; and noon to 10 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 23 What:: The AmeriServ Flood City Music Festival, formally known as Folkfest, is a three-day celebration of music, boasting a variety of genres from folk to blues to Celtic rock. Performers include the Derek Trucks Band, Ruthie Foster, Todd Wolfe, Scrapomatic, Seven Nations and more. Food is a big part of the festival, including a Community Kitchen, as well as vendors offering gyros, quesadillas, curry, cheesesteaks, barbecue, pierogi and more.
NEWS
By JAMES H. BREADY | October 16, 1994
The outlook wasn't brilliant for the Louisville nine that day -- or that year. Owners and players despised each other. The team wasn't very good, especially at pitching and fielding; the club was undercapitalized and its president, Mordecai Davidson, was lulu.Few people bought tickets to watch home games as the Colonels quickly took over last place. In a series of vain maneuvers, Davidson tried to sell his best players, then to play out the season on the road, then to sell the franchise.As May ended, the players entrained for their first eastern trip.
NEWS
By ERNEST F. IMHOFF | February 21, 1993
Some newspaper people remind me of Charles Dickens. They momentarily live in the best of times or the worst of times, as in the opening line of "A Tale of Two Cities."While they work on the planet, they must be covering the first, the last, the biggest, the best, the worst, the smallest, the loudest, the dirtiest or the smelliest thing ever.The subject today is hyperbole, or extravagant exaggeration. My own fingers have never typed such an odoriferous outrage, which is our second example today.
FEATURES
By Bob Allen | May 26, 1991
For the citizens of Johnstown, Pa., a thriving company town for the Carnegie Coal & Iron Works about 75 miles southeast of Pittsburgh, it must have seemed like the undoing of God's promise to the survivors of Noah's Ark.Around 5 in the afternoon of May 31, 1889, about 20 million tons of water -- a virtual wall of water, as high as 70 feet in places, and moving at 40 miles an hour -- came rushing down the Conemaugh Valley. It swept through Johnstown, a progressive and thriving industrial community of 30,000 nestled in the foothills of the Allegheny Mountains, at the confluence of the Little Conemaugh and Stony Creek rivers.
NEWS
January 11, 1991
Elsie Frum, 108, a survivor of the Johnstown Flood of 1889, died Wednesday in Johnstown, Pa. Mrs. Frum was 6 when she and her family fled to a hilltop and watched a wall of water roar through Johnstown on May 31, 1889. The flood killed 2,209 people in one of the country's worst natural disasters.Dimitris Mirat, 82, a stage actor who entertained Greek audiences for six decades, died yesterday in Athens, Greece.
NEWS
By Samuel Goldreich and Samuel Goldreich,Staff writer | June 9, 1991
The repairs are 100 years overdue, but Havre de Grace has lined up money to restore the Susquehanna and Tidewater Canal lock terminal to working order.The City Council certified last month that enough money has been spent on the lock house and canal to qualify for a matching $300,000 state grant for the project.The $300,000 grant, financed by a state Board of Public Works bond, will be used to finish the dredging of the lock, repair its walls,replace its gates and stabilize the canal shoreline.
FEATURES
By Nathan Cobb and Nathan Cobb,BOSTON GLOBE | January 12, 2000
Kristen Petersen's question: What on earth to do with two tiaras, atop which "2000" appears in glittering rhinestones? Gary Sohmers' answer: Put them in a closet until 2020, and then take them out and sell them. Petersen manages Crossing Main, a women's clothing boutique in Marblehead, Mass. The tiaras are the last of several such $56 headpieces, the rest of which were sold before New Year's Eve. "Maybe someone from the class of 2000 will want them," she muses. Sohmers owns Wex Rex Collectibles in Framingham, Mass.
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